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Guest bildder

What Do You Think About Solidworks Surface Modeling?

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Guest bildder

At this moment I can't post it (this car is preparing for 3D printing for my customer), maybe later...

If you want to practise rendering I will post other car - Mercedes CLS - I have made a tutorial on Polish Cax portal (unfortunately in polish language only) - here is link: http://www.3dcad.pl/artykuly/wiecej/32/Zaa...ierzchniowe.htm

 

post-16124-1226570262.jpg

 

Catia is the most popular soft in automotive industry, I know. But, could you show me some examples, where SW is not enough (without G3 or higher continuity). I'm trying to compare SW surface modeling vs. Proe, Inventor, SE (only CAD not 3dsmax, Rhino etc)

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well,... personally... SW is just ok and fun with a limited degree... and yes I know anything is possible and you can do some good stuff with SW but... (.. don't do that too much or you may go blind...)

I would suggest using another faster and more adept 3D tool if you are serious about moving forward with modeling cars professionally.

 

 

btw,.. I really like the other car you have at your site!

post-5796-1226595292.jpg

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Guest ChrisDuncan
Hi,

Thanks for replay :blink:

I'd like to compare some functionality, what can I do in SW, what will be faster in Proe or Nx, etc.

I know, SW is not dedicated for automotive or aerospace, but I think that complex surface is not limitation.

 

post-16124-1226236041.jpg

 

Did you model the tire, or is that a photo projection?

 

SW is a mid range modeler, Catia is high end. Although you're getting high end results with SW you would be even better with Catia.

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Guest bildder

In this case I have used a special image and projection mapping. Sometimes I use mixed solution - decals and material- tyre tread - in my opinion is not easy to combine them with smooth transition.

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Guest bildder

I refer to your first question...

Take a look at attached SolidWorks model.

 

post-16124-1231361264.jpg

 

In order to create a main edges (contour) I usually use projected curve -sketch onto sketch 9(2).jpg

Z4.ZIP

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Guest tekbot

this is great work. nice Car "designerxyz", I love modeling cars.

 

earlier there was a few post about continuity G1, G2 or +G3. Automotive heavily uses G3. its safe to say that even the Iphone has G3 continuity.

 

G2 is simply curvature. you can still detect visible surface changes with G2. for all practical purposes, G3 is the lead in and out from one shape to another. there really is not a program out there that can hold g3 surface continuity automatically. you have to sculpt the CVs of the surface and watch your comb plots to really achieve perfect highlights.

 

you can still get highlight breaks where spans or isoparms exist. its just how the math is.

 

hence only surfacing tools that can create single span geometry or handle spans very well like Alias or Catia is used for glossy surfaces and slippery forms.

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SolidWorks surfacing -- in my opinion, is extremely powerful but not suitable for class A requirements in aesthetics or aerodynamics. So I'd be reluctant to do a coca cola bottle or airplane wing in SolidWorks.

 

There's really just one reason: the inability to get access to your spline degree and surface hulls/cvs/isoparms. You can do a few things with isoparms using "Face Curves" but it's limited. And then there's "Freeform" which allows you to add and remove isoparms and cvs but... not existing ones or at least not easily and it's jammed into one feature/operation.

 

But surfacing in SolidWorks is above all else just fun, putting curvature combs on a spline is a snap and tweaking tangents on your spline points is both reliable, powerful and easy and the same goes for the vector magnitudes.

 

It's certainly not something to dismiss as I think ever since 2007 it can do a lot of stuff. Boundary and Fill surface are both especially powerful.

 

Here's a mould I made a few months ago using alotta surfacing:

http://www.kevboy.metalsoup.com/Matrijs_Kern.PDF

 

And a rendering I did in Photoview 360 (part of Solidworks Pro and Premium):

http://www.solidworksgallery.com/index.php...8f903f3fd2a.jpg

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