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Guest Taro

Taro's Sketching & Rendering

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Guest under-dog
o thx for the example, i know wut u mean now, and ill do it on my next camera/phone or w/e render. Its really sketchy, yet its really good =D

 

is there anything else i can add on? and is there ways i can do detail with marker on printer paper that sucks all of the ink?

 

 

btw here are some more sketches:

some of the might look really wrong, because the picture was taken at an angle, not directly on top.. i dont want to take my shadow in!

 

these are just some cameras, i thought i should post some pen only work, since the marker always smudges it.

DSC01046.jpg

line work of this device thingy.

DSC01048.jpg

rendering from a different angle, .. yet pretty close to the last one.

DSC01047.jpg

 

That device thingy is an Zircon electronic stud/center finder (for finding stud members in wall construction). I have that exact model I believe. I will have to look when I get home.

 

http://www.zircon.com/products/edge_ss_pro_sl.html

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Guest Taro

ya that was an assignment from an university. i had to do an observational drawing of a hand-held object, and i really like the form of that, so i choose that to put into my portfolio.

 

thx for the circles, is it okay if you do more explaning, on the perspective of circles and stuff, and what would be the different between drawing a sphere and a circle?

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thx for the circles, is it okay if you do more explaning, on the perspective of circles and stuff, and what would be the different between drawing a sphere and a circle?

 

An Ellipse is very different from a circle. It's a circle in perspective. I believe a sphere is a 3D object and a circle is 2D.

 

Here's a good link for Ellipses: http://www.khulsey.com/perspective_ellipse.html

 

-

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Guest Taro

i mean, if your using guildlines, then sumtimes guildlines will be the only identifycation between a perfect circle and a sphere. or perhaps bird eye view on a cyclinder versus a sphere wut is there to identify the difference when we are sketching? i know for one is to render/shade it. anything else?

 

 

edit:

i just went to that site u sent me, and generally looked at it, so i think i just lack a lot of practice of ellipses XD

 

ya.. this page is horrible, but w/e.

DSC01088.jpg

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Guest Emil Andersson

If you don't get the perspective right it doesn't matter how good you are with markers. Start to draw thru your sketches if you feel a bit unsecure.

 

And when you using markers, use marker paper. You will get much more even colors and your markers will last much longer.

 

/Emil

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Guest Austin Brown
ya.. this page is horrible, but w/e.

DSC01088.jpg

 

It's actually not half bad. You're not there yet, but you're learning how to construct an ellipse the right way. That's when you start to develop tricks to avoid having to build a box and cut it in half and... You know the drill.

 

One trick that I had to figure out for myself is to know the general orientation of your ellipse before you start.

 

It's pretty simple and it will ensure that you get close enough on your first shot.

 

If you imagine a rectangle of any dimensions (skinny, fat, square, etc) drawn upon one face of your object (front, side, or top to keep it simple.) then you can figure out generally what orientation your ellipse will have. If the upper right corner is higher than the upper left - then the ellipse will be longer from upper right to lower left. Simply, whichever corners are sharpest will be the skinnier axis of the ellipse. The wider corners will be the shallower curves on the ellipse. If you need me to illustrate this, let me know.

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Guest Austin Brown

I didn't really take the time to clean these up or make them perfect, but I think you can get an idea of how the principle works. It's just a really general way to give you an idea of what your ellipse should be doing. You have to practice to be able to make them look absolutely correct, but this is a good way to make them look "less wrong", I guess.

post-19229-1227250405.jpg

 

 

 

- I still haven't mastered the ellipse (as you can probably see) but I do understand the principles of drawing circles in perspective.

 

Hope this helps

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Guest cderby

They look descent. Try to minimize the "blotchyness" and shakiness of your marker sketches and pen work. Try to put down color with as little strokes as possible. You can still go over previously layed marker but it looks like your rendering back and forth on the page.

 

Be confident in your pen and marker strokes.

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Guest Taro

thx austin, ill start practicing those, and if i dont get anything, il make sure ill ask ya 4 help lol.

 

thx cderby, ya i notice that too lol well i personally think im getting beter at just straight lines with pen but elipses r horrible. marker.. hmm i dont know i do need a lot of practice, but it could just be that paper, since it was just normal printer paper.

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Guest Austin Brown

Just assume that it's not the paper. Then, if a whole lot of practice doesn't fix anything, you can say it was the paper. I spent god knows how much on expensive markers, paper, etc. and then I realized that no matter how good the materials were, I was missing the fundamentals. The fact that you are interested in improving your skills and asking for feedback means that you are probably very well-set-up to create some incredible stuff with a bit of hard work. Also, don't stop. I was really good with the ellipses at one point, but I've been doing research and CAD for a few months, and the results are apparent in that page I posted. I know the fundamentals by heart, but my brain and my hand are arguing. not a good situation. :wacko:

 

Keep it up.

 

-austin

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Guest Taro

thx, i know what you mean austin. But i just want to make a point again that, markers really do spread out fast n crazy in these normal papers, but indeed, i do need practice.

also, lol i dont know if this is really a problem or not anymore... but my pen smudges with the marker alot unless i wait a couple hours then render. Yet my friends were telling me that... they thought i purposely did that... lol

 

so.. i hope ur getting ur feeling back austin, i think your ellipse are still pretty good!

 

also, i would love to scan every piece of my work on here, but most of them are idea sketches for my portfolio. I did do lines, and ellipses on seperate pages, but they are all similiar to the previous post... so i dont want to make it boring for you guyz to read lol.

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Guest Austin Brown

I know what you mean about the marker smudging the ballpoint ink (at least that's usually my problem). One thing to do is make a photocopy of the line drawing before markering it. Then throw some marker down on the photocopy (toner doesn't smudge nearly as much as fresh ballpoint ink). You can even put some high-quality marker paper in the copier and try that. Just make sure you do it one at a time so you don't jam the machine. I also scan the linework into the computer before I start using the marker on a sketch, just because I know that it usually smudges very easily. This way, when I ruin the original sketch, I can print out a new one and try again. and again. and again. and so on.

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Guest Taro

wow good idea lol thx. im gonna try that like.. right now.

 

also, isnt there this copic pen that doesnt smudge with markers?

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