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Clothes Peg


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#1 Mark Marzouk

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Posted 23 August 2008 - 06:53 PM

Hey guys, this is the first product designed by M-Design that will be going into manufacture in the next couple of months. Let us know what you think...

M.

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#2 Guest_clark_*

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Posted 23 August 2008 - 09:38 PM

I would be very worried about those ribs inside the peg pulling on my clothes

how does it attach to the line? The renderings are confusing, in the 3d render it appears there is a curve in the inside edge where it would grip the line, but in the 2D drawing it is not there

I don't see what advantages it has over a regular wooden/plastic peg- with a normal peg the line sits in a an empty space between the 2 halves and the clothing is held in place by a pinching action between the 2 halves. Your clothes peg looks like it would be much harder to use one handed, which is a big problem, as most people have all their washing in one hand and peg it up with the other, and I don't think i'd trust myself to be gentle enough only using one hand, because of the way it would grip the clothes by pushing the clothing against the line, which might pull on delicate fabrics and if the washine line itself is dirty then you'll have a dirty mark on your clothes


I think a one piece design has advantages in terms of manufacture, but the loss of practicality (in the current design) outweighs it

#3 Mark Marzouk

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Posted 23 August 2008 - 11:00 PM

hi Clark, thank you for your comments. I assure you the product works very well. There have been many prototypes of the current design. The product has been designed with curves on every side of the gripping area. The peg grips the clothes to the line as you stated by wedging the clothes and line between the tightest of the teeth.

The advantage over a wooden peg is that it is mich more hard wearing. It will not absord dirt like wooden pegs do and of course it will never rot.
The advantage over regular plastic pegs is that it will never come to pieces, you wont find springs popping out at you. and also there is no metal to go rusty and leave marks on your clothes.

M.

#4 Guest_simpo_*

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Posted 24 August 2008 - 04:25 PM

Hi M,

The design looks interesting. I think the product perhaps can do with better gripping comfort.

All the best with the production and sales ;)

#5 Guest_JelleT_*

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Posted 26 August 2008 - 10:14 AM

Looks good! It looks more solid as last time, I'm sure you're able to clamp your clothes within. Only thing I'm worried about now is when you push down to hard. Do you get the effect of a balpen clamp that breaks? Did you test this?

Hope you understand what I'm trying to explain.

As for the graphics on the side, are you really going to put that in production or is it just for promotion purposes :D

#6 Guest_csven_*

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Posted 26 August 2008 - 02:55 PM

@Clark - I believe you're misinterpreting the 3D view. Why not post a marked up image?

@Mark - My primary concern is that with a shut-off down the center, those gripping teeth amplify any flash off the tool which might occur, resulting in greater wear/tear and potentially even ripping/snagging of the fabric. Not something you can test with prototypes or even early production pieces, but an issue which might present itself over time; a quality assurance issue, but one that's made more of an issue by the design solution.

Are there other clothes pins with similar teeth? If so, did they provide any sense of how much a problem this might actually be?

btw, you should include a link in the opening post to the other thread showing your earlier efforts - Link

#7 Mark Marzouk

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Posted 26 August 2008 - 06:10 PM

@JelleT, yeh when you push the peg down onto the garment it snaps to the line in a way and grips very well. im gona go out to the washing line in a minute and take a couple of shot of it on the line. haha. because the plastic isnt too thick it also have a bit of flex in it which helps finding the tightest set of teeth to grip to.
the graphic on the side is for presentation really but i do want to have some type of organic vector on the side with a matte to glossy transition. need to get look for some nice graphic ideas now.....any ideas? if so email me some to info@mdesignegy.com
maybe someone on here could influence the final design. ;+>

@csven, the flashing is something i have thought about but it is something that the tool makers in Italy will really care about. they will have to position the split line of the tool in the correct position. from the italian manufacturers they expect to get a shot life of around 1 million+.
i have never seen any other clothes pins with teeth like this before so i cant see any examples of what could happen.

M.

#8 Guest_csven_*

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Posted 26 August 2008 - 07:07 PM

have never seen any other clothes pins with teeth like this before so i cant see any examples of what could happen.

That issue might be why you don't see them. One snag on a nice garment - especially something people would care to air-dry instead of stick in a machine dryer - could lose a customer and generate some nasty word of mouth backlash.

I certainly hope that doesn't become an issue and wish you the best of luck.

#9 Mark Marzouk

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Posted 26 August 2008 - 07:52 PM

yeh i understand your concern. it will definately something that i will be discussing with my tool maker.

M.

#10 Guest_JelleT_*

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Posted 26 August 2008 - 10:08 PM

yeh i understand your concern. it will definately something that i will be discussing with my tool maker.

M.

Quick sketch, section over your clothes peg in X

If you don't want that toolsplit over the teeth you should lay your splitline outside them. If you keep your cloth peg symmetrical you can still use identical left/right moulds. Hope you understand the sketch :)

About the graphics.. you can add a flowing splitline with more taper. This will increase the price of the mould offcourse but saves an extra production step.

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#11 Guest_csven_*

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Posted 26 August 2008 - 10:55 PM

Was trying to figure out what was missing from that sketch and then realized that the teeth don't have to go flush on the end using that solution. It's additional complexity and cost, but the tool itself is just open 'n shut so that hopefully won't be a deal-breaker.

And don't forget the shut-off angle between the two halves; 5-7 degrees is what I always account for. Might get tight in the top section.

#12 Mark Marzouk

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Posted 26 August 2008 - 10:58 PM

thanx for the advice. i understand your drawing, iv just never seen a split line like that before. The mould will already be very expensive because it will be 10 or 12 cavities.

M.

#13 Guest_csven_*

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Posted 26 August 2008 - 11:09 PM

Clarifying above.

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#14 Guest_csven_*

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Posted 26 August 2008 - 11:12 PM

thanx for the advice. i understand your drawing, iv just never seen a split line like that before. The mould will already be very expensive because it will be 10 or 12 cavities.

May I ask what the current quote is running you?

#15 Guest_JelleT_*

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Posted 27 August 2008 - 07:38 AM

And don't forget the shut-off angle between the two halves; 5-7 degrees is what I always account for. Might get tight in the top section.

Clarifying above.

Thnx for adding, that's as important as the draft-angle. Don't know the numbers but 5-7 seems a lot, was thinking more around 3 degrees.

@Mark Marzouk
Anyway I'm sure your Italian-toolmaker will knows these numbers. Could you post those? Or PM me, kind of curious about that one.




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