Jump to content


Sponsors:
Rapid Prototyping Services
- - - - -

Handbag Design Inspiration -pls Help!


  • Please log in to reply
21 replies to this topic

#16 Guest_unhappymaiden04_*

Guest_unhappymaiden04_*
  • Guests

Posted 10 July 2008 - 10:01 AM

just add a lil bit..

ummm i think what u guys talked up there is kinda "micro designing", what i mean by that, is, those methods just deal with the designing of the product itself.
But i think design :

*) is much more than that, the environment, social context, technological aspect, culture aspect, or marketing strategy, are at least just as important as the form or function of a product.

*) should hav an idea, character, and message. and these things should be communicated through form.

so... it still a long long journey.. ^_^


You bring up an excellent point. I didn't consider this during my explanation because his question was simply on how to go about integrating inspiration from unrelated objects or things into his design. An answer more than that would be irrelevant to his original question. These topics, ofcourse, are important when designing and are usually included in a design brief that specifies who, what, when, where, why as well as how.

As for unhappymaiden04:
What inspired such design? Perhaps if you included an image of your inspiration it would be easier to critique as to how well you have integrated your inspiration into your design. As of right now. It's a bag, yes, and....? I notice they're two different bags, reasoning for the different designs? Please clarify your reasoning.



these designs just came to mind when I saw my office mate's pleated skirt,(the first collection)

the second one was inspired by a ribbon...sorry,I think I just suck at developing products derived from other objects...that's why I wanted to seek help...:( I'm really new in this kind of field...everything is very hard for me...it's like a baby trying to walk on his own...:(

#17 Guest_P3NGU1N_*

Guest_P3NGU1N_*
  • Guests

Posted 10 July 2008 - 10:22 AM

Are you sure these would be for teens? You're using very toned down colors with deep magentas and rose colored reds. These are sometimes associated with.... old people. Perhaps this is just my personal feeling but I think the bag seems like something that would be used by someone more in their late 20s early 30s more so than the 15-20 age group. The bottom design seems more successful at getting to the teenager age group just because it's not as complex and stoic. Instead that one has ribbon-shapes which give it a certain whimsical aspect that I think teens respond to.

Does anyone feel the same or am I just a little bit out of style? =P

#18 Guest_Nephtis_*

Guest_Nephtis_*
  • Guests

Posted 10 July 2008 - 10:29 AM

"the second one was inspired by a ribbon...sorry,I think I just suck at developing products derived from other objects...that's why I wanted to seek help...sadsmiley.gif I'm really new in this kind of field...everything is very hard for me...it's like a baby trying to walk on his own...sadsmiley.gif"

Don't give up, i once heard a good quote from Thomas Edison (lightbulb-inventor-guy) during his process of developing the lightbulb: "I made thousands of different designs and each of them didn't work, but at the end of every try, I knew that option wasn't the sollution". Don't give up, everytime you do something you suck at but realise you sucked at it, keep in mind that you also ruled out several faulty options.

I also know what you mean about getting into the CAD or Illustrator etc to early. I used to have those problems at my job too. I thought my boss wanted to see results right away so I only did nice pictures and sometimes even started in CAD to show an idea. I lately realized that this wasn't helping me, or my boss, so when I get a new project, eventhough they want me to show results early on, I keep in mind the process a good design should have and stick to it, I make powerpoint presentations capturing every stage and started showing them to my boss at every next stage. He now has a better idea of what I'm working on and I don't have the feeling that his eyes are burning in my back because he wants to see a product directly after the briefing.

What I'm trying to say, poorly, is that you shouldn't be afraid to design like you were taught. Show your boss that the processes you go through are usefull. Involve him in it, and use it to your advantage.

#19 Guest_P3NGU1N_*

Guest_P3NGU1N_*
  • Guests

Posted 10 July 2008 - 11:50 AM

I second Nephtis. Process is so important. You shouldn't rush the design phase where the ideas can be rediculous. It's this exploration that makes product designers so important. After that we can always tone down a ridiculous idea and make it presentable in an orthographic view so that production can begin.

#20 Guest_unhappymaiden04_*

Guest_unhappymaiden04_*
  • Guests

Posted 11 July 2008 - 02:46 AM

"the second one was inspired by a ribbon...sorry,I think I just suck at developing products derived from other objects...that's why I wanted to seek help...sadsmiley.gif I'm really new in this kind of field...everything is very hard for me...it's like a baby trying to walk on his own...sadsmiley.gif"

Don't give up, i once heard a good quote from Thomas Edison (lightbulb-inventor-guy) during his process of developing the lightbulb: "I made thousands of different designs and each of them didn't work, but at the end of every try, I knew that option wasn't the sollution". Don't give up, everytime you do something you suck at but realise you sucked at it, keep in mind that you also ruled out several faulty options.

I also know what you mean about getting into the CAD or Illustrator etc to early. I used to have those problems at my job too. I thought my boss wanted to see results right away so I only did nice pictures and sometimes even started in CAD to show an idea. I lately realized that this wasn't helping me, or my boss, so when I get a new project, eventhough they want me to show results early on, I keep in mind the process a good design should have and stick to it, I make powerpoint presentations capturing every stage and started showing them to my boss at every next stage. He now has a better idea of what I'm working on and I don't have the feeling that his eyes are burning in my back because he wants to see a product directly after the briefing.

What I'm trying to say, poorly, is that you shouldn't be afraid to design like you were taught. Show your boss that the processes you go through are usefull. Involve him in it, and use it to your advantage.



yeah i wanted to do that...it's just that I feel pressured cuz she wants me to produce a design,uhm at least 3 to 4 collections of handbag designs for a span of 3 days...time is really scarce for me...

#21 Guest_tarngerine_*

Guest_tarngerine_*
  • Guests

Posted 11 July 2008 - 10:41 PM

like, finished design with materials and all, or 3-4 well thought out concepts? because i dont think 3 days is too short for you to produce the concepts. its only a little more than 1 a day, which shouldnt be too difficult unless you also have other stuff to do.

i really think that you should still draw it out, even though you are more used to illustrator... doing things on the computer is completely different than drawing things with a pencil.

also, i dont completely agree that it looks like it's for old people. however, i do agree that it's not really for teens either. but i think the only thing that's causing the dispute is the graphic you have on there (why that particular style?)

#22 Roger Mark

Roger Mark

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Location:USA
  • Status:Professional
  • At:Quest

Posted 22 February 2017 - 04:10 PM

Hello,

 

I think you get help from https://www.pinteres...ign-inspiration It contain 1000+ hand design ideas with the latest trends from the top professional product stationery designers.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Sponsors: