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Guest GRID

Datsun 240z Concept

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Guest AutomóvilVerde

Like few others said, there's way to much going on in the front, and that one picture where you said it doesn't stick out, that's because it's black. Also the front isn't balanced with the rear. Also the headlights should be flush, or it looks too much like the old one.

 

Other than that very nice renderings, and I love the rear.

 

By the way, is this just something you're doing in your free time?

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Guest Buff
The last two renders are stunning, but I agree with Cyberdemon and cash. Those headlights would look a lot more sleek and modern if they had a flush housing - sort of the route that BMW took when modernizing the 507 when they built the Z8.

bmwZ8vs507.jpg

 

 

I'd have to agree, though not nessesarily on the grounds of asthetics.

 

 

As a concept, it's fine, but it wouldn't see production in this guise IMO.

 

The front air dam would need to be reworked I think, as most of he other have said, and the rear screen lovers would be unlikley to be seen outside of a car show. the rear end as is would generate lots of lift and the car would be unstable to drive at speed.

 

But as I said, asthetically, it gets my vote...beautifull

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Guest AutomóvilVerde
the rear end as is would generate lots of lift and the car would be unstable to drive at speed.

Why would there be so much lift, is it the curved bottom?

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Guest Buff
the rear end as is would generate lots of lift and the car would be unstable to drive at speed.

Why would there be so much lift, is it the curved bottom?

 

Not at all, on the contrary in fact, the curved underside (assuming this would be verified with CFD and possibly wind tunnle work) would generate negative lift, ie. downforce.

 

The curved upper surface, especially toward the rear is what would generate positive lift.

 

to understand this better look at a cross section of an airfoil, (google NACA/airfoil) and look to the similarities, also imagine an upturned airfoil to understand why a curved underside (floor) would generate negative lift.

 

Further study into the works of Colin Chapman (Lotus F1 Team founder) and Daniel Bernoulli,

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Guest AutomóvilVerde

I get it now, but it's nothing a rear spoiler couldn't fix right? Or even a front spoiler.

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Guest Buff
I get it now, but it's nothing a rear spoiler couldn't fix right? Or even a front spoiler.

 

Yes, that's right. but there is a differance in the functionality of front spoiler (aka air dam) and a rear spoiler/wing.

 

An air dam serves to create a seperation of over body flow and underbody airflow, this is done to generate an area beneath the car that has lower pressure than above, thus pushing the car down to the road.

 

A rear spolier is designed to eliminate or reduce a low pressure area at the rear by fooling the airflow into behaving as if the car was longer and flatter roofed (look into the design of the Gurney lip) by creating a controlled turbulance and seperation of laminar flow.

 

A wing works slightly differant in that it it generates negative lift independantly from the car body, just like an aircraft, but upside down.

 

What i would say though, is that there can be a significant disparity between conceptual styling and actual production.

 

You cannot ignore the constraints of practicallity, be that in the form of cost, manufacturing process, functionality (in this case on-the-road stability). You can of course ignore asthetics, but sales would suffer, and that wont keep designers in work for very long.

 

Spoilers have long been thought to be ugly aditions, the Audi TT has been a case in point as has the Lotus Elise, infact the styling guy had a major fall out with the aerodynamacist and production engineer about how they were "changing the look", but Lotus could not sell an unstable car, so a spoiler HAD to be fitted, much to the disgust of the stylist.

 

Remembering the Porsche Boxter concept car for a moment, that was designed to be a retro styled car concepted around the Porsche Type 550A sports race car, and a fine job of it the stylists did make too, yet the production version differed significantly and customers were disapointed, angry even.

 

My advise therefore to budding automotive stylists is, you controll the market, because you controll the customers emotions , (especially so in the sports car sector) and buying cars is largly an emotively driven desision, even in the family car sector, so pay attention to manufacturing and functionality constraints and include details that will be seen on production cars, because customers are often dispaointed that the car they bought is not the car they saw at the show.

 

If these details are worked in by a skillfull stylist, so they look an homogenious part of the design right from the begining, I suspect that would have positive results on car sales

 

Just my $0.02 worth

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Guest AutomóvilVerde

Thanks for the explanation.

 

I thought spoilers made the car look better, when they're done right. I'm not talking about civics with a massive spoiler... I mean like the Audi R8 V12 TDI or Evo, especialy with the Evo, it would look unbalanced with out it.

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Guest Buff

I agree with you three, but these 'wings' where part of the overall concept, in the case of the R8.

 

The Evo, whilst staring out as a Lancer, has had the overall styliong to be both functional, and asthetic

 

The R8 is one of the better styled cars of it's catagory IMO

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Great model and great renderings.

About the spoiler issue being discussed, I guess you could also go with a more subtle solution than putting a wing on it. I believe they had the same issues with the first Shelby Mustangs. That was solved with a small lip. You can see it on a 1967 Shelby Mustang gt 500 or for instance on a 1970 Opel GT. That should be enough to create some of the needed turbulence.

 

I like the looks of the design. Especially reminds me of those smaller coupes from the 60's and 70's.

 

/tbroen

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Guest AutomóvilVerde

Or you could put flying buttress c-pillars. They're flap looking things on either side of the car that create down force. They have them on the Ferrari 599. They're not very noticeable, but my be hard to incorporate it into the car you're designing.

 

This is what it looks like

post-27920-1232067874.jpg

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Guest olmasters@googlemail.com

Wow, this is fantastic!! I love this car, although like others I dont really think the fairly square grille really matches the curvatious body lines of the vehicle.

 

The paint options also look interesting too, although personally I'd be more tempted to go for a modern rendition of more classic hues such as those now used by jag for cars like the vantage etc. If it was up to me I'd veer away from quite bright boy-racer style colours because luxuary car companies like jag/lambo wouldnt style their cars to look like 15k kids cars so really why should you. I just think it dresses your car down and gives it the wrong image, not something I'd associate with a luxuary car.

 

I am loving the retro theme of this car and I think it would look increadable with some fat rear arches accompanied by some deep dish wheels in the same style that you've used here.

 

Ollie

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Guest nallen00

This is a great concept. It's difficult to argue homogeneity when starting with an existing design. The idea of an aftermarket special vehicle such as GRID's 240z is to create a certain amount of tension in the original design, which I believe was executed quite well here. It was Nissan's job to create a harmonious design...it is our job to inject a theme that resonates with that design to create a unique, and entirely new character. Continuity within such a theme, or its degree of tension, is a more valid argument...

 

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