Jump to content
Product Design Forums

Treasurebox
Sign in to follow this  
Guest harg666

Rendering With Markers

Recommended Posts

Guest harg666

hi,

currently in my 1st year at uni and recently bought 3 sets of kurecolor markers and could do with some help with them. is there a book that someone would recommend to help me on my way

cheers

chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Jay08

mmm i spent a lot of time looking for good books and to be honest, i havent found any that offer good or relevant advice. The best thing to do is play with them and figure what looks good and what doesnt....Post drawings of your progress up on the forum and you ll get an honest critique..

 

Good luck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Piers
I know a book about sketching with markers but more architectural.

 

Thomas G. Wang - Sketching with Markers.

 

 

I blieve it is Thomas C Wang if you search amazon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest firecracker

I have thomas wangs book as a scan, must say its rather terrible.

 

Just rough architectural sketches no specific technique at all.

 

It horrribly outdated and wont teach you to render .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest -EL-

I would recommend Design Sketching .

But this book goes through the whole process from fast sketching to rendering, not only rendering with markers. It shows renderings with photoshop, markers etc. It contains a lot of pictures, and doesn't go very deep into the different techniques. It explains everything in a short and concise manner, just the way I like it. When I'm sketching I always have it by my side in case I need any tips or inspiration.

 

EDIT:

I found a thread where they talk about these two books, looks like the one Jay08 recommends is better.

http://www.productdesignforums.com/index.php?showtopic=7718

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is only one book worth considering:

 

Presentation Techniques by Dick Powell. This has been around a while but it is still the best from a master of the art (Dick is the Powell from design consultants Seymour Powell).

 

Available from Amazon and all good bookshops. You will not be disappointed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Jay08

The Dick POwell one is a bit date actually and doesnt emcompass modern media...Useful but there are better ones!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought the question was - recommend a good book that shows me how to use markers? By modern media I assume you mean Photoshop and Painter? The principles are exactly the same so in that respect the book is just as relevant. Another good one is the Alan Pipes book Drawing for Designers, which does cover up to date techniques...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest katerina

hey i have design sketching and the sketching:drawing tecniques for product designers

i recomment the one SKETCHES : DRAWING TECNIQUES FOR PRODUCT DESIGNERS IS BEST .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well after reading this thread and being a book addict I went and bought a copy of Design Sketching and Sketching-Drawing Techniques for Product designers. Both are very visual books in the sense that they are chock full of excellent designer sketches, so in that respect they do what they say, but, they don't actually go into too much detail on the actual techniques used in a way that would help the average student just starting out. They are great books for experienced designers looking for ways of expanding their repertoire of techniques and sketching styles but to be honest I think they are too thin on actual instructional content to be much use. As a coffee table book in a design office great. As a reference for a new student, I don't think so.

 

So I got out the Dick Powell book again, well I couldn't as some bugger had nicked it - sorry, borrowed it - so I bought a new copy which was a bit different to the one I used way back when. As an instructional book I still say its the best in terms of actual USEFUL day to day design development from concept to presentation. As I said before as well, I reread the Alan Pipes book Drawing for Designers and that is also very instructional indeed and does have several step by step tutorials covering a range of media.

 

Anyway, the only fly in the ointment is that there are loads of free online tutorials available now that, well, us older timers just didn't have access to back in the late 80's ;)

 

To be frank many of them are truly fantastic (and some are here). If it was me all over again - use Google, learn online then get all the books from the library!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Honestly... marker rendering is dying. Cintiqs are changing everything. A lot of design firms are abandoning them completely... doing rendering digitally = faster, cheaper, less waste, etc.

 

It still uses the same techniques, but I'd rather be good at sketchbook than prismacolors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You cannot take a Cintiq on a train or a plane, and you would really struggle to take it to a customer meeting as well. Cintiq's are great bits of kit but they are very expensive and (as someone who makes the decisions and pays the bills) cannot be justified by many in a normal design office environment, especially if the mainstay of the CAD system is something like SolidWorks, where a big screen is far more useful. You get a hell of a lot of biros and markers and layout pads for the cost of a large Cintiq - not to mention the power used to drive it and the high end PC or Mac needed to get the best out of it.

 

I know some people who use them of course, but the vast majority of designers I know use layout paper, markers and pens for concept stages. Personally I still use markers on paper and when needed I scan and add colour in Photoshop. I've got a Wacom Intuos tablet but if I'm honest I still prefer pen and biro for sketching linework.

 

I think if anything is dying it is the ability to do quick linework to work through design feasibility concepts. To be frank I tend to sketch now for internal use only and present 3D CAD visuals to customers, even in the very early stages. For many product design tasks you need the accuracy of CAD from the start.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest csven
Honestly... marker rendering is dying. Cintiqs are changing everything. A lot of design firms are abandoning them completely... doing rendering digitally = faster, cheaper, less waste, etc.

 

It still uses the same techniques, but I'd rather be good at sketchbook than prismacolors.

There are some techniques that aren't well-emulated by software (and be aware that I was a sketchbook beta tester and am generally a very big supporter of digital tools). As an easy example, here's an old, large marker rendering - Link. Notice the background with the bleeds and "bubbles". That's lighter fluid and a pastel mix ... with some lighter fluid drops for the bubbles. Took a few minutes. Emulating that in software at that resolution would take hours and still not look as organic.

 

The key, imo, is to take advantage of all tools. Different media with different advantages and limitations can help us see things that might not emerge from using the same graphic technique and tools day in and day out. Leaving comfort zones is, itself, a problem-solving technique.

 

When I was in school, the first thing GM and Chrysler instructors did was yank our pens and markers and force everyone into using huge chunks of charcoal on newsprint. Concepts were to be generated within 10-15 seconds. Software and interfaces are a long way from emulating that experience.

 

Lots of design firms offer design wallpaper and design by-the-pound. No surprise they want to standardize into comfort zones as well. Besides, how many design firm principals really want design employees that think?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.