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Guest Mikedesign

Car sketch tutorial

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Guest Mikedesign

Hi designers!

 

I posted a sketch a few days ago in the sketch section, and I´ve had some questions about my marker tecnique, so I thought I give you a walkthrough of my process.

I hope you´ll enjoy it and get some out of it!

 

As usual starting out with some lineart, this in particular was done in Painter 6....really don´t know why I did it digitally...

It´s nothing fancy about it, but always try to consider line-quality as being one very important factor when sketching.

 

I chose a basic one point perspective for this sketch. This car i drwan in a elevated side view. This view both gives the image a nice depth and also shows the side of the car. The side silhoutte is a cars most important angle. It says a lot about the proportions, the type of car and is usually the first sketch you do in a new project.

post-8-1109193907.jpg

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Guest Mikedesign

The second step includes some very quick markerwork. I did this with a Copic C2-C3, with multiple strokes on each other.

Try to work like you would do with a brush, giving it a more artistic feeling.

I also sketch in a dropshadow, suggesting a strong lightsource in front of the car. This will give the sketch a strong contrast and create some very exciting core shadows.

I did some light work with the Copic airbrush, beginning to sculpt the form. Work gently, beginning with a light shade. This tool is great for giving the car a metallic texture. The spray pattern does actually resemble the look of metallic paint....I think at least.

post-8-1109194134.jpg

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Guest Mikedesign

On this one I have added more value, starting to establish a constrast

realtionsship between the different surfaces. Trying to make it clear where the really dark/light areas should be. I´ve indicated some interior shapes with a dark marker. By showing some silhouttes from the interior, you give the car a optical depth.

I´ve also added a horizon reflection in the sidewindow. This is done fast and simple.

I choose to make the tires all black, just to keep it simple. I know that I will scan the final sketch and therefore have the chance to run it through Photoshop. Here can I add various details such as a tire pattern etc.

Then I worked the form around the wheels a bit, trying to establish the fenders, clearing out the wheelarches.

To make the perspective more evident, I drew the major axis through the wheels, with an arrow in the beginning/end. This will increase the experianced depth of the image.

 

Parallell to the marker work, I usually switch to a verithin pencil, for example to work the reflections a bit and give it some fast sketchy strokes the enhance the artistic feeling. The verithin can also be used to give the marker work some texture.

 

In order the make the design more evident, it´s very important to show the partinglines, featurelines, DLO´s, graphics in a good and intressting way. The most obvious way to do this is to make them look good and give them confidence.

post-8-1109194364.jpg

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Guest Mikedesign

The next step is perhaps the hardest to describe. It involves a lot of tweaking. The purpose of this it to take the raw sketch and make it beautiful. How you reach this result doesn´t really matter. All type of manipulation is ok when sketching, as long as your idea gets stuck in your clients head.

 

In this stage I copy the original background layer in photoshop, so I have perhaps five layers with the same image. Then I can begin to adjust the contrast, saturation, the levels, colors etc.

I often create masks to be able to adjust a specifik area of a picture. In this example a chose to create a mask for the rear part so that I could work on just that area.

 

Then it´s just a matter of polishing the image. Perfect the partinglines, perhaps add some detail, like I did on the rearpart.

 

 

If you have have any questions, please don´t hesitate to reply to this thread or send me an email.

 

I hope this will motivate you to keep using markers as a creative medium, with the fine tuning possibilitis that Photoshop offers.

 

Sincerely

Mikael Lugnegard

www.mikedesign.se

post-8-1109194530.jpg

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Guest randomboy

Mikedesign!

 

I am envious, jealous, depressed at the fact that i dont posses this quite frankly amazing ability!!!!!!! :) (in the most positive, "im gona get better, practice, practice, practice kind a way)

 

The work on your site is just beyond words,

 

very much respect

 

Matt-UK

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It's fantastic to see a traditional/digital rendering tutorial here :) Thanks for your effort Mikedesign. I have just pinned this topic to get more attention to this one :) . Btw, I think I have learnt one more thing for my sketching skills: don't forget to pay attention to line quality! It really helps the sketches to look less flat/less boring. So Mikedesign here is my question: how do you approach putting lines down (thick to thin lines...)?

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Guest Mikedesign

I don´t know if I understand your question..but it´s just a matter of pen pressure and speed...doesn´t matter if you use the digital pencils or a Verithin

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Guest Mikedesign

Generally, put thicker lines on surfaces facing downward. Also use more pressure where lines begin or intersect. If you´re making a long sweeping curve, press harder at the beginning and make it fade out. What you don´t want is lines that are constant in thickness.

 

If your are drawing a profile of a motorcycle, try draw the lines facing away from sun lightsource darker and the ones at the top very light....

 

Another good trick is to make the silhouette thicker than the interior lines.

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Guest abhinav

Really great that u've shared the techniques. Thanx for ur efforts.

 

For traditional rendering, i.e. on paper, which surface or paper u use. Is there any combination for markers and surfaces to get a good result

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Very nice, thank you for sharing.

 

How did you end up with that design, I am interesting the process before you get to the final line work. I guess what I want to ask is how do you appouch rough thumbnail sketckes, idea generation?

 

Yeah pretty much any tips about clean keeping sketch clean, while still flexible for change.

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Guest wenxiang

Cool sketching and rendering! i wish i could do that too.. still practicing on it... hee.. thank for the tips.. they're cool

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Guest effjay

hi, cool tutorial.

 

i studied technical illustration & the rule of thumb regarding line weights is this:

 

if you can put your finger behind or under the line (i.e. it's an edge) then it is "thick". all other lines are thin. of course, theoretically, a light source must be taken into consideration meaning that the "thick" lines that would be on the top of a cube should be thinner than the "thick" lines on the bottom of the same cube (because the bottom edge is further from the light). also, you could allow for distance from the camera, so that a thick line would start thicker nearer the camera (view point) and gradually get thinner the further into the distance it goes.

 

i hope that you can understand my ramblings!!

 

i've attatched a quick sketch to try and illustrate what i was trying to say. if you have any questions, post away!

post-8-1114502419.jpg

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