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Clay Bake Challenge

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I am not sure if this part of the forum is closed to one or a few for posting form challenges. if so please promptly delete my post.

 

on another forum I was discussing problem solving techniques and used one software or another as requiring more problem solving workarounds over another and got into more of a bench mark explanation... long story short I explained that when I learn a new tool I force myself to create a forum using specific model practice or techniques in push myself at the tools harder.

 

Right now in our office we are pushing the Rhino tool very hard and struggling some. But for this challenge I suggest the interesting part is to leave it open for any tool. Pro/E, SW, Maya, Rhino, Alias, Catia, Unigraphics.... That way we might get more participation from those who might not have thought to participate.

 

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I think this screen shot image is good but maybe an iges file is better? I made a 30 minute list of challenges with respect to Pro/E, Alias, Rhino and Solidworks.... problems workarounds and techniques.

 

ABBREVIATED BENCHMARK COMPLAINTS FOR THESE FOUR TOOLS

 

Pro/E: users utilize the add on package ISDX to use COS to trip back the melted glass. 2 uses parametric combined with free form curves to parametrically control (not calculate) the bake and melt sag. parent child relations aid engineers calculate the bake process parametrically. WF 4.0 allows user to tug and pull on internal CV's of the surface yet while maintaining parent child relations to the original curves. End point constraints can accomplished with the Curve thru Points tool in stock Pro/E however upon redefine of the curve thru points on surface requires loosing the tweak mods before redefining. No Isoparm display on the surface offers no density feedback to designer therefore compared to light geometry that might be created in Alias Studio no isoparm display may create unnecessarily more dense geometry. Warp tool in Pro/E is hard to localize manipulation and might be difficult to manage the hot clay scenario.

 

Alais: - since Curve on Surface cant force tangency on end points in Alias Studio or Auto Studio experts might reach for the common work around alternate technique of using a 3 degree curve not sketched on surface and project instead as a work around. Alias experts like to tug and pull on the internal control verticies of the surface to obtain the weighted hot glass look instead of managing thru curves. Hi end users often brake construction history so they get to rebuild the curves and surfaces instead of making slight mods to make before and after bake or melting games. When modifying and pulling on internal CV of surface user is forced to brake construction history. Full tangency and isparm display.

 

Rhino: user has to constantly rebuild curves and surfaces ... designers are still struggling with the model in our office this week and I have not seen if they can force tangency on COS endpoints. Rhino parent child is maturing and users remodel to obtain the various modes of melted glass. When modifying and pulling on internal CV of surface user is forced to brake construction history. Full tangency and ispparm display.

 

SW: model technique works similar as Pro/E without the add on expense of ISDX but lacks realtime update feedback. SW can't project a 3d curve onto surface so the Alias technique is not possible in SW (2007) but this curve on surface technique works great since in SW users can control end point conditions with curve on surface. As user flexes for modifying the weight of the hot clay scenario before it cures the parent child relations might fail or require a repair. Users can not modify internal CV (maybe they can?) of a surface. 'Fill surface' tool offers unique tools for managing the weight of the hot clay exercise. No tangency line nor isoparm display might cause more complexity when creating cross or internal curves due to not being able to snap directly to the tangency edge. 'Flex input' tool works here for a work around to managing the weight of the clay mods but the tool is difficult to localize and control the tool (2007)

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Guest davo

Here's a look at something quick in Solidworks...just to get a feel for the geometry. Not a bad start.

post-7273-1201990496.jpg

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I was hoping to see some Catia or Unigraphics updates. Today I will try my hand at making a video and uploading it to youtube.com Ill do it first in Pro/ENGINEER then in Solidworks a little different from davo's version. I am practicing my video creations by the way and am having some problems with audio. I will keep re-recording till i get the sound acceptable.

 

So don't laugh too much... I tried my hand at creating some videos and had fun doing it. I will add these videos with others to our training library.... This Pro/ENGINEER WF3.0 video version/addition to the clay bake challenge into three parts. 1 modify the part - 2 create from scratch - 3 parametrically adjust the clay. The same technique can Works pretty much the same for solidworks and Catia so i challenge you you guys to modeling the same. Hard to do this technique in Rhino and Alias because there is not a tool for forcing a curve on surface tangent or normal on one end or the other. Joel our Alias instructor creates that geometry a completely different way. Challenge to JOEL who always tells me I am doing it wrong... publish your technique! One of my students uses Catia designing interiors for armored trucks. This challenge goes out to him as well.

 

Pro/ENGINEER Surfacing Three part series on Youtube for the Clay Bake Challenge series. http://www.youtube.com/bbrejcha/ < my first training video in years. Sound is a bit choppy so will redo that one and add one that rebuilds from scratch.

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Guest Shader

Here is a preliminary A-Side surface done in Alias StudioTools. The lip is done with a 4 part Square Surface and trimmed back. The edge fillets were done by aligning freeform fillet curves to a projected curve on surface to get tangency. Once these fillet curves were aligned properly I then project them as Normal and trimmed the surface back. The resulting lip is G2 due to the fact is was made using degree 5 curves.

post-20413-1204059032.jpg

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Looks like Joel upped me a bit with the G2 connectivity with curve projected on surface with an Alias example. Now do one using Subd - nerbs or poly in Maya Joel! Now if we can get someone from our office FRANK to give it a shot. I have one past student using Catia at an armored truck facility designing armored interiors who may be giving a crack at this.

 

http://www.mcadcentral.com/catia/forum/for...;PN=1&TPN=1

 

I invited some Catia users over (one high end user in China) from http://www.mcadcentral.com to check out this claybake ordeal. I hope to be enlightened with the power of Catia!

 

no UG or other takers? I will try a video using Solidworks and challenge another in the office with Rhino but after that i have exhausted my resources for this thread.

 

maybe whats next is we upload each of our models to the forum and let each user prove out different iterations of each others models?

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Guest Shader

Here is an example of a Sub D surfaced pitcher done in MAYA. The NURBS profile curve used a 1/8" thickness and was revolved to create a SUB D pitcher. The image here shows the poly cage which was manipulated to create the form as 1 complete surface. Using this method assures G2 across the entire model. More detail can be added as needed but I left this one pretty simple but pulled a handle out to show how Sub D converts to NURBS patching.

post-20413-1204153051.jpg

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Guest Shader

OK here I converted the Sub D geometry to NURBS in MAYA and then exported to Alias Studio to show you the diagnostic shading and patching. You will noticed the colored patch surfaces and the zebra striping showing continuous G2 continuity.

post-20413-1204153396.jpg

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Guest Shader

OK another quick grab showing the handle detail and how MAYA SubD converts to NURBS patches.

post-20413-1204153538.jpg

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Guest Shader

Very nice I like! Styling is always good rather than copying verbatim. Now let's see if we can get a Unigraphics or Solid Edge styling. Oh yeah I don't see any Rhino takers yet. Hint hint

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Guest dicksham

Here is a way by CATIA... (totally 7 slides)

This is a parametric-modeling approach, so there is a parent-and-child relation between curves & surfaces.

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post-12848-1204281117.jpg

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post-12848-1204281128.jpg

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Guest dicksham

Do you mean "isoparametric curve"? i believe the curve is built by the below theory:

- break an edge into certain portions and then break the opposite edge into the same number of portions

- draw a straight line on the surface between an endpoint and the corresponding point on the opposite side

 

Therefore the tangancy direction of the curve depends on the shape of the surface, we cannot change it without changing the surface.

 

For the above exercise, if we don't like the isoparametric curve, we can draw a spline curve on the surface instead.

 

Besides, i prefer creating the positive fillet (adding material - page5) by the surface modeling technique, especially when the connecting surfaces are complex in shape. Sometimes i extend the surface by myself that is better than done by the system automatically. But for the negative fillet (removing material- page7), i would use solid modeling technique because the system is easy to handle.

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