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Cyberdemon

Alias Revolve Tutorial

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This is a quick tutorial showing how to use Alias Studiotools to create a form similar to a Playstation game controller. The intent of this tutorial was to show an alternative NURBS based methodology to Ragdes excellent tutorial on creating a game controller in Solidworks. (Seen here)

 

This was modelled in roughly 5 minutes in Alias Studiotools, but the basic technique of moving Control Verticies (CV's) should also apply to Rhino. The basic tools used in this were the translation commands (move, scale, rotate, move pivot), and the revolve tool. While not a direct copy of the original design intent this tutorial should show you how you can freely scuplt complex shapes from a simple surface.

 

1.jpg

 

2.jpg

 

Here I've gone in and just quickly traced a rough curve over Ragdes original blueprint. This is just for a guide and won't actually be used to make any surfaces, so it can be sloppy.

 

3.jpg

 

 

4.jpg

 

Here I've built a 5 degree curve as a straight line (Curve from Edit points, hold snap to grid), and build the curve along the grid so I'm sure it's tangent along the axis I'll use for symmetry. I also moved the last CV down and made it perpendicular so that when I revolve it the end of the revolve will be tangent to itself. I also move the pivot up to be at the same grid snap as the point I want to revolve around.

 

 

5.jpg

 

 

6.jpg

 

After the revolve I wind up with this bullet shape. Notice how the last row of CV's (highlighted) are all in a plane keeping the end nice and smooth (instead of pointed).

 

 

7.jpg

 

 

8.jpg

 

I rotate the CV's for the end cap 90 degrees and move them into position to form the end of the handle. I then use the translation tools to scale, move and rotate the rest of the CV's I have to try and match the design intent.

 

9.jpg

 

Realizing I need more control over the surface, I add a few isoparms (one close to the center - giving me the extra row of CV's I need to keep curvature continuity across the middle of the surface)

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10.jpg

 

Continue tweaking the CV's to try and match the top profile.

 

11.jpg

 

12.jpg

 

Now I go in and start tweaking some of the CV's on the rear face to scuplt the back surface. This is where I decide to stop (for times sake) but in a real modelling experiment this is where you can start to evaluate your surface, decide if you like where its going, and if you've messed up too bad just go back to the beginning and start again - the nice part about working quickly is you can rapidly scuplt your surface and if you decide you don't like it starting over only means losing 5 minutes of work. In almost any real world project you'll probably model the same geometry at least half a dozen times, however each time your surface will wind up cleaner because you'll learn where you have too much or not enough geometry for manipulation. It's scupltural objects like this where Alias can really start to shine.

 

13.jpg

 

Base surface finished and ready for detailing.

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Guest nicolelee

hi ,everybody

 

i am a young worker in a aotomobil company. And i am a designer about 3D cas and A-class . I have done some cars project the last year.

 

i am glad to see you here, i am not a ltaly peopel, i hope i can make some friend here.

 

Contract me :nicole_lee123@hotmail.com

 

thankyou!

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Guest michaelAtSPG
[snip...]

 

Realizing I need more control over the surface, I add a few isoparms (one close to the center - giving me the extra row of CV's I need to keep curvature continuity across the middle of the surface)

 

Great tutorial!

 

This sounds nitpicky, but it's my strength so I'll just state it: it doesn't matter *how* you deform this

surface, it will stay curvature-continuous (unless you make control points coincident). If you

want to add an isoparm for control to realize design intent, go to it. But this being a degree-5-by

degree-3 (or more) surface, it will be at least curvature continuous everywhere on its interior.

 

In some cases it may not appear so, this is due to the shading or tesselation of the modeler's

display routines.

 

Obviously, knowing this has not led *me* to make a great tutorial, (yet!), so I truly appreciate

the great work here.

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Guest eezydo

I think Cyberdemon was referring to continouity across the mirror seam.

 

However a mirror edge is that exception where two rows of CV's should be enough

to maintain G2 across the seam. - Since both sides ( including curvature ) will be identical.

 

- Or am I missing something.

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Guest simpo

Thanks for the nice tutorial.

 

But how do you control the draft angle?

 

regards

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