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#16 Guest_A17_*

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 10:03 PM

oh dear!.. I can't even pull it out ..even with tweezers..

oh it was pull to soft! not hard, Dang! no wonder i had to press so darn hard in photoshop

edit: alright i figured out how to get it out.. instead of trying to clamp it, i got the sharp-nose pliers and use the cutter part,lightly clipped the nib and pulled it out with ease. I took that nib, compared with other nibs, and otnly the side was a bit worn, worn so it'd have a sharper poit but the length is roughly the same so im glad.

I'll keep this as a future reference in case I forget, and i hope this is useful for others too

#17 engio

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 12:59 PM

Now I don't know about bamboo or any other tablet, but on the pen that came with my intuous2 you're supposed to unscrew the front end, then take the nib out, no tweezer pulling.

Oh, and I have had my tablet for more than 2 years now and still using it - never replaced the nib. You must've been pressing waaay to hard :blink:

#18 Guest_A17_*

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 08:59 PM

its fine now :) i changed the tip feel to a much softer end so i never have to press hard..

#19 Guest_A17_*

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Posted 12 January 2008 - 11:22 PM

quick question, i read up that since these pens don't require batteries and they use some different signal, doesn that mean i can replace the nib with anything? I mean, I'm the person who cares a lot about sustainability. I jsut thought of making a completely metal nib, maybe from a nail I can unsharpen. Will it work?

#20 Cyberdemon

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Posted 13 January 2008 - 12:00 AM

Absolutely not. The nibs under normal usage should last years, if you're pressing so hard that you damage them in that short a period if time you're doing something wrong. My first tablet at school last 4 years on 1 nib. The Wacom tablet works on electromagnetic resonance, which means sticking a big piece of metal in there will not only ruin the surface of your tablet, but probably will stop the pen from functioning correctly.

#21 Guest_shane_*

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Posted 23 January 2008 - 03:37 AM

teeth and pliers? :D didn't your wacoms come with a specialty tool for removing nibs? mine did.

#22 Guest_The_R_*

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Posted 23 January 2008 - 09:18 PM

Well everybody says Wacom is the way to go, so I won't even bother buying another make to feel the difference.

However, I'm having some trouble deciding on a size. I normally draw on A4 paper (12x9) so does that mean that i should buy a tablet resembling this size, or does the zoom ability in software programs make up for the size? (I'm assuming that if you zoom in on a detail in say Photoshop you still use the entire tablet area, while only working on a fourth of your drawing. Hope that made sense :wacko: )

Next problem is the format 4:3 or 16:9?
My screen is 4:3 so I know a tablet of the same format would be best, BUT, I'm hoping my tablet (most likely to be an Intous3) outlives my computer (I'll probably upgrade my lappy in two years time). So can I still get enough out of a 4:3 tablet with a 16:9 screen? or can I use a 16:9 tablet efficiently on a 4:3 screen?

Hope you can help me out....

#23 Cyberdemon

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Posted 23 January 2008 - 09:45 PM

The only widescreen tablet is the 6x11. Since the closest size normal aspect Wacom is the 6x8 - consider buying the 6x11. You'll lose some real estate but if you make the swap to widescreen (inevitable) it'll all balance out.

If you bought a 6x8 and then upgraded to a widescreen you would LOSE tablet real estate. By purchasing a 6x11 you GAIN real estate.

I had the 6x11 before I got a job and moved onto a Cintiq and it was a very nice size all around. But I also was using it to supplement a 14" tablet PC which I did my actual line work on. The tablet itself was really more for Photoshop rendering (difficult to do on the tablet PC because of the lack of keyboard).




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