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Guest rocsta

What's The Most Flexible Way To Make A Path?!

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Guest rocsta

I'm so frustrated :'-(

 

I tried to make a path in Illustrator from my sketch I scanned, I worked several hours and gave up on it. I find many tutorials how to render etc. but there is no tutorial how to make a simple path to have an outline of your sketch. I just want a nice clean outline with the lines sticking together, or is it better to have them seperated?

 

I don't have a Wacom tablet yet, so I can't just do an overlay. I can't figure out how to do it with the path tool. When I make my lines of ALL sections most lines overlap and I don't know what to do with them. I like how you have every path section on an saperate layer in Illustrator, which you don't have in Photoshop, in PS you have to always create a new layer in the path tablet. Do I even need Illustrator? Or can I just do it in PS?

 

Here is a screenshot where I stopped:

 

01_outline.jpg

 

 

You see, there're many little sections on the shoe and I just don't know how to handle that. What to do first and what to do next, what to merge and what to seperate, just to many information. I don't know where is left or right in this POS program called Illustrator.

 

I also don't know how to go further along and color this shoe, I would like to click on the single sections and color them with the brush tool without coloring what's around the sections. Therefore I'd need to have all the path seperated right? How can I do that? And how do I avoid overlapping?

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Check out this page:

http://www.productdesignforums.com/index.php?showtopic=3157

 

Illustrator is very powerful if you understand it. The key to good lines are to use the fewest points as possible. And you have to think of what you want to do first, that'll determine what strategy you should take when building them. If you're going to render in illustrator, it's a whole different approach than if you're just doing lines and will render in photoshop.

Take your time to understand the pen tool, it's your friend.

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Guest rocsta

Thanks for helping. I looked at the link and there are many helpful tips but I still don't know what to do with overlapping parts. For example you make an outline of the sole, then there are lines within the sole and when you want to make an outline of the side of the shoe you have to go over the sole AGAIN and then you have two or more lines ontop of each other, how to handle that so that there is only one even line?

 

Here is a pic of my sketch and the path made in Photoshop I'm more familiar with PS from my graphic design days back then.

 

02_photoshop-outline.jpg

 

This time I didn't go back to the starting point of the path because I wanted to avoid overlapping lines, but now I have an other problem, the GAPS between the lines, that means I can't choose the single parts to color them not even with the magic wand tool.

 

Look at this render I made in Photoshop:

 

06_render-and-sketch.jpg

 

Here are not so many lines so it was easier, I made a path of every single section in Photoshop and I always went back to the starting point of the path. And I always made a new layer for the path itself, so I can choose them afterwads to color them. But here I have the same problem which you can see, at the front of the shoe, the lines that are overlapping.

 

Maybe I'm making it more complicated than it is. Maybe I just should get an Wacom tablet and do the overlays by hand but then I wouldn't get the lines so nice.

 

Another question is how much do you resize your sketches after scanning? Because they are very big after scanning. Do you resize at all or do you just use zooming?

 

Thanks again.

 

EDIT: Why does my status say "Professional" when I'm asking those question in the forum LOL, I remember chosing amateur while registering

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Last minute change technique:

-Draw the outline of the shoe as a closed path.

-Then draw the next line that will at some point cut through that path, such as the line for the top of the sole.

-Select both lines (make sure there is no fill on them. Go to pathfinder-divide. That will split your original loop into 2 paths using that single line you drew as the common border.

Ungroup the 2 loops if you need to. Creative use of this technique helps you get the solid shapes you need if you want to color individual parts.

 

Occasionally it acts a little funky meaning you'll have to do a little cleanup but in general this helps you get those shapes that share the same border.

 

**I don't like this technique much because it's time consuming and you still end up with 2 lines directly over top of each other. If you have to change the shapes you're screwed. So only use this technique if you KNOW there won't be any changes and the boss just told you last minute that they need it colored (if you knew it was going to be colored from the beginning, use the technique below). Tell your boss that too so they learn to keep you in the loop from the beginning so that you can work the most efficiently.

 

Quick technique:

This way uses uses illusion and overlays.

-Draw the shape of the bottom of the sole correct up until you hit where an intersection line is (like the line for the top of the sole).

-Then just connect there to make a closed loop (yeah it looks funky). Make sure it's filled with white.

-Next draw the line for the top of the sole correctly, starting to travel up the shoe uppers- until you hit another intersection line. Then connect them like you did before. Continue drawing these shapes and use overlapping techniques to make the lines just look right. When you grab the line for the bottom of the sole and give it a fill, it'll look like it stops at the top of the sole (but really it's just that the shape for the upper is over it).

Basically anything that you know will be colored, draw as a closed loop. Anything not colored, open line. Then just making sure things overlap correctly will allow you to do a quick line drawing.

 

See the tutorial I posted for the "bring to front / back / all the way to front/ back" key commands. They'll make things go by much smoother.

 

 

Good luck.

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Guest rocsta

Thanks for your walkthrough man I appreciate it very much, it really helped to understand how it works. I took some time sketching and doing other things to cool down from the frustration with this computer stuff. So I tried an secound attempt after reading your second technique (didn't try the quick technique yet but will keep it in mind). Well it worked good so far it took me long but was not frustrating at all, it was actually fun to do.

 

Here is a screenshot of may sketch with transparancy and the path linework, it shows where I stopped:

 

03_illustrator-sketch-outline.jpg

 

The single sections are ALL with white filled loops they're just overlapping BUT there're no lines overlapping that's what I wanted. This is what you meant right? I hope I understood it right. I stopped at the part with the laces because I didn't know if I should do the same technique on the laces? Because I was always shifting the layers back and forth trying to get it work on the other sections already, and now it gets way more confusing on the laces.

 

Would it make sense to use the same technique on the laces? I don't know how you do it in 20 mins, crazy. haha

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For the laces:

-Draw your eyelits since they're in the back.

-Then do the laces as a closed shape, no need to do anything special.

-If they overlap, do the bottom one first, then the top one, the same way you would lace in real life.

 

I would really advise you to try the second method, the first method where you're using the pathfinder tool doesn't let you make changes very easy. It's much easier to just draw your shapes and make sure they overlap in the right way. If you do the first technique and someone points out that your sole is too thin and needs to be a different shape, you'll end up with a mess trying to modify 2 lines that are directly on top.

Please, re-read the second quick method and practice doing it that way, trust me.

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Guest rocsta
Please, re-read the second quick method and practice doing it that way, trust me.

Just to clarify, that's what I did on the whole shoe the whole time, I used the 2nd technique. Sorry if I wrote it a lil misleading. As I said I didn't even try the first method yet.

Now that I got a lil time to think about it I realized what my biggest problem is. I didn't think so much about which sections I do first, which second, which third and so on, that means most of the time I was spending on re-arranging the layers because I didn' t do the sections in the right order. That's why it took so long, but that not so bad as long as it's fun to do. Now that I got a feeling for it and undestood the technique I'll keep that in mind for the next time.

 

I'll follow your advice and finish the laces and then *hopefully* color it in Photoshop. :)

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Glad it worked out for you. There's definitely strategy needed for illustrator. Knowing what your end result is supposed to be from the beginning and doing things in the right order are important.

Check out www.techvector.com This guy does really nice renderings completely in illustrator. Look under illustrations-realistic (near the right hand side) and click the white boxes to see them.

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Guest rocsta

I'm finally finished with the linework. It was really hard, the hard part on the laces was that the color of the path lines changes on every new layer and exactly on the laces it changed to yellow OMG I couldn't see the anchor points I missed them trying to click on it and I didn't know how to change the color until I was finished with the laces I found out how to change the color of the path lines LOL.

 

I looked at the link the guy is really good, the camera illustration sticked into my head that was kinda good can't believe he did that all in Illustrator.

 

I attached the finished linework in original size. Now I'll color it, I'm satisfied with my 3rd shoe render which I posted above but it does look slightly cartoony, I think it's because of the outlines and also no textures or professional highlights. In you Illustrator to Photoshop tutorial you apply some tricks to make the outlines and corners look more realistic. Can I do similar tricks on shoes? I found some tutorials about coloring shoes but it's more with airbrush etc.

 

ALSO: This time I'll try to add some textures to make it look more realistic, I'm doing always a little more, step by step.

post-17944-1198172503.jpg

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Guest A17

i learned photoshop this january, almost a year ago, first thing i learned was doing render work using the pen tool. I picked up on that quite fast.

 

I tried Illustrator a couple months ago and i find it frustrating because in photoshop, if i messed up placing an anchor point somewhere, i would be able to move it and resume making my path. In illustrator, if i screw up and want to move an anchor point, I can't because I don't know how...

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Make sure you're using the "open arrow" (the white one). You can click and drag the points around. To continue drawing from a previous line, make sure you're in the pen mode. Then just go to the last point of the line that's selected with the open arrow tool. And if you just click and drag on that last point, you'll continue the line with the next click. The little box next to the pen cursor will turn into a "plus" when it's over a part of the line in case you have to add another control point.

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