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Guest gerard

Photoworks rendering tips

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Guest gerard

Hi all!

 

I am having some rendering problems with this crappy photoworks (can't use anything else.... :-( ) Does anybody know of a good "advanced technique rendering" tutorial for photoworks 2?

 

Or maybe you can help me out.

I need to make this look a bit more realistic, but, as soon as I render the top glass with the rest of the product, problems start....I'd be better off with no glass at all, but I am trying to get a decent rendering with all the parts in it...

any idea anyone?

thanks

chers

 

gerry

post-23-1108747737.jpg

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Guest retrokitsch

May be the problem is the glass material. I dont know photoworks, but if this material is allready given by the software I would try to create a new material with the properties of glass I only want, to have the image I want.

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Photoworks is not very good at representing light sources realistically. The filament inside should be a light source and Photoworks cannot bump up the incandescence of an object beyond a certain limit. I tried yesterday to duplicate the look of light inside but none of my tries were realistic enough.

You can play around with the technique I show below- getting a good rendering depends on the interplay of lights, material and environment. More importantly the following technique works within the limitations of Photoworks.

The stock glasses in Photoworks are surprisingly good (not excellent), so you have to remember that the environment is critical to get a convincing look

Just work methodically to progressively layer environment, lights and material.

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initialrender3yq.jpg

 

Everytime a designer sees the stock Solidworks render, he says " HULK SMAAAAASH :D" because it sucks sucks sucks ;)

Renders like this is why most designers believe that Photoworks sucks. Just remember that lurking under layers of interface and programming lies a very powerful rendering engine.

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interactiverendering7za.jpg

Turn on Interactive Rendering to see the scene in realtime. Solidworks uses a stock room to create renderings. You dont see this room while modeling. Use this room to your advantage. For the next few months at least (till SWX 2006) any environment that you physically model affects the perspective displayed. So do as little extra environmental geometry as you can. When you add an environment like a studio back drop this typically flattens the perspective. So use the SWx scene for lighting and backdrop.

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changeenvironment2ld.jpg

 

First change the background so that it is black. Then change the material of the floor to something more neutral that does not fight the model. Hide all the walls of the room. I dont like to have sharp lines running around my renders so try and eliminate the corners and walls. Then to proceed delete all the lights that you can

 

Although the image above does not show it- one important modification is to Align with XZ plane (or other as appropriate) and set Floor Offset to 0mm . This snaps the ground plane of the scene to the model bottom. No more floating ghost models.

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renderdark9if.jpg

Yikes- Why did you tell me to do that Parel??

Well start from dark and then progresively add lights so that you know what your lights are doing.

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lower4ol.jpg

 

Turn on Indirect Illumination. Note that there are no lights in the scene (except for a very little ambient light from the default in there) and there is still light. Where is it coming from?

Remember that we changed the Ceiling material to "Dark Room Ceiling". This is a Constant shader and in indirect illumination situations behaves like a light. In a regular render this kind of material looks like a cel shader.

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surfaceplanelight1sl.jpg

You can actually make the scene brighter by changing the environment background color from black to lighter shades of grey. You can also affect the lighting by lowering the ceiling or increasing the size of the roof, but also remember that increasing the size of the roof directly affects the ground plane as well.

In this case I have optimized the room somewhat but it is still a little dark. Create a surface plane and set the material to "Dark Room Ceiling" Use this as a diffused light source. For some reason this lighting actually renders much faster than stock Solidworks lights. The shadow quality also tends to be a little better.

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planerender8rq.jpg

The plane adds a nice rim to the top but the render is still a little dark at the front. I would love to add a plane at the viewing window, but this always messes your perspective. So..

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spotlight1yl.jpg

and set the spotlight so that it does not cast shadows. This spotlight also tends to add nice specular highlights.

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renderspotlight1ff.jpg

It looks decent with stock material. Now you can proceed to add materials. See how we progressively work through the render so that we know how our tweaks affect the render.

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testmaterials3pt.jpg

This is the point where I tweak the materials. During the tweak phase, zoom out and render small regions to make quick changes.

materials3hw.gif

These are the materials I finally chose to approximate what I thought was your design intent.

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finalrenderlight6ya.jpg

There you go- a step in the right direction. These have not been retouched in Photoshop though I invariably tweak the render later for color balance or highlight certain areas.

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Guest gerard

Parel, thank you so much!!!

 

by a completely different way...this is what i just came up with...

not so bad after all...not finished thought.

 

but: Parel what solidworks/photoworks are you using?

 

I am runing a 2004 sp 5, and PW 2.... And I don't think i have the "dark room ceiling" material....maybe you are on SW 2005 and this is new?

 

On the other hand, I think I might be doing something wrong, cos I can't really ad spolights when using indirect illumination, as it almost burns the hole scene...

Now, after reading all of your great tips, i'll try some other things, but,...How do you manage to make the light to lite up only part of the model? do you use a spot and put only part of the cone intercepting the model?

 

thanks again,

chers

 

Gerry

post-23-1108935403.jpg

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