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Guest Lilith

Learning How To Draw

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I'm sorry, but that's complete crap. We are designers first and artists second. Communicating the product use, form, and context is first.

 

These sketches are perfect. If she wants, she can throw in a splash of color but the sketches are clear, the perspective is for the most part spot on, and the line work is simple and confident.

 

Actually, I think you could learn something from Lilith, Gringoire.

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Guest Gringoire
I'm sorry, but that's complete crap. We are designers first and artists second. Communicating the product use, form, and context is first.

 

These sketches are perfect. If she wants, she can throw in a splash of color but the sketches are clear, the perspective is for the most part spot on, and the line work is simple and confident.

 

Actually, I think you could learn something from Lilith, Gringoire.

Read carefully... I appreciate the work... but sometimes we want to see something different... I mean at her level... because she's got the basics... And it's not crap... it's my opinion... And another thing... people have different perspective... designers as well... We run with different engines... but we can have same results! If my way seems weird to you, that doesn't mean I'm wrong... and you aren't wrong as well... I hope you understand my words... and I do learn things from anyone I encounter... in real life or virtual... Thank you!

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All I'm saying is someone who still has issues with proper perspective probably shouldn't be trying to offer advice in regards to sketching.

 

Lilith, sorry for hijacking your thread.

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Guest Lilith
Very good perspective... but your work is way to clear and similar...(don't get me wrong... it's good to be clean and clear but not way to...) You must have moods... like everyone... so try drawing some complicated thing you saw or have in house or whatever... when you are sad... when you are mad... very angry... and when you are happy... you don't have to post your work but to learn how to merge your feelings in your work so it can be simple or complicated but different... you must see sketching as an art also... it's not really an art but if you add a bit of heart it will look more "natural" and real... Overall... nice work! now add a bit of life... !

Gringoire thanks for your time, the reason i am posting works here is to recieve some feedback, so thanks for that.

I do see your point about drawing in different moods, but this is only an exercise really, trying to capture the shape, it is more a "mechanical process", the below drawing, on the other hand, is something i do just to express myself and thats when i illustrate my moods and emotions, but i found it a bit irrelevant to post "too aritistic" (if i might say so) works on this forum

 

blue_dr.jpg

 

Bradford thanks for your comments, i dont really think i am that confident in my drawings yet, but its encouraging to read a positive feedback so thanks for that :)

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Guest iD34

Hi Lilith,

 

You are really improving over time ! You are starting to get a grasp of perspective and finding form and deriving shapes from it. The only thing I'd suggest apart from practise is to start using different lineweights to 'pop out' the areas you are trying to design ie if lines are facing the surface, they will look thicker etc and maybe try and make the sketches different sizes and overlap as more of a free flowing concept like those last cars. Also start trying to gesture your lines in as few strokes as possible - other than that - really cool :)

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Guest Austin Brown

I agree with ID34. Those car sketches are great. Your ellipses are off - but that's understandable. The overall form of the cars - body, hood, glass, is all great. I also think that different lineweights will help to give your sketches a more dynamic quality which will make an OK sketch good, and a good one great. Economy of line is a term that means making a form out of as few lines and as little fuss as possible. While an artist might use 10, 20, or 80 brushstrokes to paint a bowl or an apple, an ID sketcher can do it in as few as 3 or 4 lines. Why do any more work than necessary? One really great thing that you do that many designers forget is those construction lines. They're really helpful in defining the overall form of the object, and they make a "bunch of lines" turn into a real thing. a real car. Keep it up and work on your ellipses. If that's the thing that makes you uncomfortable, then you should be working on it until you hate it. then some more. then a little more. and do it all over again the next day.

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