Jump to content
Product Design Forums

Treasurebox
Sign in to follow this  
Guest Lilith

Drawing Skills

Recommended Posts

Guest Lilith
For now, draw your lines straight through, you can always just overlay and retrace the correct ones.

I would think most people have their 1 or 2 angled lines they draw the easiest. Sometimes you can even spot out a left or right hander by what positions they consistently draw their products. I'm right handed which makes it really hard for me to draw a line that travels to the upper left, going upper right is extremely easy. You can spin your paper but then you lose your reference. So you can draw it sloppy just to get the positioning right and use that page as an underlay. When you draw over top, spin the paper however you have to in order to get the good quality line.

Or you can just visualize where the line should end and make a mark, then spin the paper to get the good quality line.

cool thank you :) well i am left handed and it didnt occur to me that someone could spot that out :)

about spinning my paper, actually i didnt get to point to use referaces yet :blush: i just draw from the object i put in front of me, so no problem with that yet :) or maybe i could stick 2 papers together ?..

thanks again

 

 

dont want to get annoying to everyone but i have another question (which is actually to everyone who can help me :( ), i seem to have problems with cross-sections, are there any consideration? i am practicing and practicing and at some point i can see little imporvement but drawing cross-section still remains the hardest one. thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest fnewallsmith

Hi Lilith,

 

Just to let you know your not the only one, i think there are a lot of students out there who got little support at university when it comes to learning sketching and rendering.

 

I was the same, a big class with not being able to see what was going on etc, and also at uni with all other work you never seem to have time to concentrate on improving your sketching as you have too much other work to do!

 

Im on a placement year, and have been practiscing hard, and have had a lot of improvement, still got a long way to go tho!

 

wot i have done so far..

 

Buy this book,

 

Its got some realy good tips from some amazing designers in Sweeden, looks scary at first, but with practisce they have some really good advice.

 

http://www.designsketching.com/

 

And this book

 

http://www.amazon.com/Drawing-Designers-Al...s/dp/1856695336

 

I've only just brought this one, but it gives you lots of tips on materials designers use and the way they sketch and a bit of design history too.

 

The main thing to do is practisce, take a sketch book and hb pump pencil evrywhere with you, and even if you think you look like a freak, its amazing sometimes what you can come out with on a long train journey!

 

I hope this helps,

 

Felix

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Lilith

hi Felix thanks a lot for your reply :P

yes you are right "Design Sketching" is an amazing book i already got it few days ago :whoo: and i think we have a discussion on the forum about the book as well. will take a look at "Drawing for Designers" cheers :)

 

 

i am going to open new topic "learning to draw" and will post my stuff, hoping that you will help me to improve myself :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest bgp3te

hey felix hows the placement going? I'm just finishign first term of second year, just handed in the jaguar project!

 

whats your sketching skill like now then? I'm planning on some hardcore practise in the summer break to get up to speed with mine. Did you find it hard to get a placment?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Irl_Designer

They're very hands on with the core skills in our course - drawing and communicating ideas etc - but, as the previous posters have said, you need to put in the hours yourself and refine your technique. No-one can do it for you.

 

The drawing studios in the college are left open until nearly 10 every night and, while it's not compulsory, we're expected to be there (or somewhere else) sketching away. Invest in a good mobile drawing board, marker/pencil set, few A2 pads or sketch books - and just practise where-ever and how-ever you can.

 

I'm only at it a few weeks - and have gone from barely drawing a straight line to decent looking development sheets. They're far from the best - but just remember continuous improvement.

 

Plenty of tutorials out there - books and internet - and thanks guys for the 'Design Sketching' suggestion. Looking it up now.

 

Start with your perspectives (1-3point) and basic objects. Basic, I know, but these are the building blocks for any of your future work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest kronos

there's nly one think that will really help you "learning" how to draw and get better at it. practise.

I reccomend you -highly- the basic drawing dvds by s robertson from gnomon.

but practise every day. practise makes perfect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest ryan.manty

The environment and talent you surround yourself with is a huge factor.

 

If you can't find that in person, utilize sites like this. Look at others sketches and mimic then. Hell just copy it. It'll help you realize what you need in your sketch (LQ, persp, shading, contrast)

 

Find some good music and coffee then just go to town.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Buff

Hey Lilith, don't let others lack of passion get you down. honestly I'd rather employ someone crap with passion to improve that a lazy genius any day.

 

I got knocked back from ID course because my sketching is crap, so I went and did Mech Eng instead. No regrets mind you.

 

I will say this though, being a great sketcher will make you a great sketcher, but wont nessesarily make you a great IDer. There is so very much more to ID than comunicating style through great sketches. Those graphs n stuff really are more important in the end. Understanding things like consumer demographics, anthropologhy, ecconomics, manufacturing processes, materials etc are much more important that 'drawing a pretty picture'

 

There are so many ways to comunicate design such as simple 3d modeling and foam block models (I love carving foam and I learned to do it by making artificial limbs) and there are many approaces too; top down, bottom up, inside out, outside in.

 

Being good at sketching really facilitates only one aspect of ID and that is comunicating design intent/problem solving quickly and cheaply.

 

One method I've been using to help me improve (and boy do I need to improve) is to trace a photograph of an object taken at differant perspectives. This way I'm begining to learn how lines should flow, how to proportion things and how to see where the light is comming from and shade.

 

It may well be a poor way of learning, but with such little time it's kinda working for me. Of course there are many more tallented people here who probably have beter ideas of how to improve.

 

Best wishes with your progression

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest tede
The environment and talent you surround yourself with is a huge factor.

 

If you can't find that in person, utilize sites like this. Look at others sketches and mimic then. Hell just copy it. It'll help you realize what you need in your sketch (LQ, persp, shading, contrast)

 

Find some good music and coffee then just go to town.

 

 

I really agree with this.

 

One thing i think that no one has mentioned, and seems counter intuitive but has really helped me get better at drawing is CAD.

 

Make sure you model with the perspective view, this will get your eye used to what perspecitves look like. If you have access to SW try putting what ever object in to trimetric, dimetric and isometric, flick perspecive on and off an soon youll get a good eye for seeing when your perspective is out.

 

Another good learning from CAD is how the surface/patch divisions show you where radiuses begin and end, the surface lines tell your eye what the surface is like...you can draw those in by hand, and you get the shape your after.

 

As they say though practice is the key.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.