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Guest aross

Sustainable Ivory

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Guest aross

These products have been created using waste cow bone - a by-product from agriculture - which would otherwise be incinerated.

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Guest aross

The wii bone has been designed as a themed product to accompanie videogames such as resident evil

post-17592-1195603133.jpg

post-17592-1195603169.jpg

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Guest ***

WTF!

What kind of drugs did you take to have this crazy idea, wich is kind of smart, I have to admit.

 

I like the radio and the remote ( must be strange touch feeling...) but the design of the lamp somehow doesn't work for me. looks like R.H giger design wich I don't like (personnal opinion).

 

Great renderings, simple, efficient, they tell the story very well.

 

Very funny.

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Guest lcipd

hey andy, fancy meeting you here :P those images are awesome...is this what your final concept will be like? i like the radio the best. keep up the good work :)

 

Lauren

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Guest Obelix

:shocking:

 

but you mustn't have dogs around house! :P

just 1 thing...every cow doesn't have same bones....some are smaller, some bigger, some broken...etc, so you could "spend" lot of cows per "radio" or something....as for lamp...I would choose "ribs" of some smaller animal.....better effect lol

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Guest toodef1

OK im onto it now . . .I thought these were ground up cow bone - no the actual bone them selves. Have you thought of grinding them, binding - then molding ? I'm unsure of the back ground to your project - however i'm unconvinced that "retro fitting" a product in the bone is a good move . . .especially as no bone is the same.

 

I dislike the aesthetic of "dead items" used like this - although it has a particulay, um, interesting novelty factor.

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Guest aross

I’ll let you in on a wee secret…

These images aren’t actual designs I intend to make but rather small part of my design research to understand how people would respond to a product made of these materials. I’m currently investigating the potential of using animal by-products from agriculture in product design. I’ve been using these images, as well as others, on various forums online to explore the reactions of different types of users depending on how the product is presented. (i.e. eco-friendly, luxury, gothic etc)

 

I am also interested in how designers themselves respond to these materials, so I would appreciate it if you could leave a comment on your gut reaction to the images/products. In this topic I’m going to share the real reasons behind the project and I would like to hear your views.

 

The Problem/ Need/ Opportunity:

Cow bones are an abundant and incredibly strong raw material which is created naturally and efficiently by animals, yet is currently being discarded in a way which is highly detrimental to the environment. Previously abattoirs would get paid for their leftover bone material by companies making bonemeal, however since the CJD crisis this is no longer the case. They now have to pay to have them incinerated at a cost of £80 per tonne in the UK, which is of course doesn’t help the already struggling rural economy. An abattoir I visited in Scotland creates around 20 tonnes of this material everyday, which are transported to England at a cost around of £1600 per day. In Europe over 3 million tonnes of bones are incinerated every year. These disposal costs means that bones are potentially a free raw material.

 

What’s also interesting is that these materials can be cleaned and processed using colonies of dermestid beetles (insects) so require little energy to process and sterilize.

 

Most bones from a cow are classified as fit for human consumption – it is only the spinal column which is hazardous. Provided the bones are kept separated from the spine they are safe to use in products and are even safe enough to be eaten… (if that’s what your into)

 

 

My investigation is split in two haves:

 

1. Science: exploring the mechanical properties of bone in a bid to uncover specialist applications which utilize the properties of the bone itself.

 

2. Design: exploring ways to overcome the stigma associated with this material in order for them to gain acceptance in society. Does the way a bone product is presented or marketed affect its perception? Would people be comfortable with a bone in their house? How do vegetarians feel about this? Can they be made fashionable/ desirable/ valuable? – the images posted above form part of this investigation.

 

 

Design as solution?

 

I feel there is two ways designers could help remove these materials from the waste stream.

 

One way would be to find applications where the properties of bone perform a useful function. A tutor was telling me how there is a company making scalpels out of obsidian – a material used by cavemen on their primitive tools – for modern surgery. The obsidian makes a cleaner cut than metal and also wont interfere with any equipment. Could bone have a specialist application?

 

The second way would be to make them desirable and therefore valuable. In the same way that ivory was, or fur coats. Ivory and fur coats were cruel to produce – however cow bone is waste and a potentially 'eco friendly' material.

 

I’m sharing this with you because I think it would be great if designers could help solve this problem and don’t think I can do it alone. I am very keen to hear your thoughts.

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Guest aross

Thanks for the comments.

 

Lcipd: cheers Lauren!

 

toodef1: I agree that retro fitting isn’t a particularly viable use for bone, the images above are actually only being used to gain reactions to the material rather than feasible products.

 

I had considered grinding them down and using them as an aggregate however I found that there is has already been a lot of research conducted on using bonemeal in cements. I hope to try and find applications where the bone is kept whole so it retains its strength and structure.

 

I’m getting some samples of cow shoulder blades –a large, solid, flat bone which was historically used as a shovel apparently. I intend to place it on a CNC mill to see if uniform thickness and size sections of bone can be machined. I’m also infusing bones with different polymers to determine their effects.

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Guest squareitround

It's a very interesting idea. I would think the CNC route to make uniform parts would be the best bet for mass production purposes.

 

I'll be watching this thread with interest.

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Guest sketch

Great thread.

 

I got a few goats skulls around the house that my brother picked from Africa - and I don't mind them (great mantle piece). But when you use it in products like these - there' is something uneasy about it - almost barbarian and caveman like. Instantly it feels less appealing, and less sophisticated.

 

From an emotional design point of view – The idea does shock you a little bit. And you begin to feel more distant from the product, and less attached – which is exactly the opposite of what product designers are trying to achieve in the first instance.

 

I can tell you now that the religious Hindu community would not be happy - as cows are regarded sacred. :)

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powdering technology...

Use bone as a raw material ...In my opinion, if it could be use as a cement or after we pulverized we can shape easily.. if we use the bone as a semi product there will be problem. not every bone can be shaped with cnc router..

http://www.goodorient.com/Ox_Bone_Powder_D...coration_P21243

 

http://www.goodorient.com/Bone_Powder_Ches...hess_Set_P23173

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Guest toodef1

Yeah - The success of the final product will come from how you decide to use the material, what context it will be used in, AND the function of that product. Get all three right and i reckon your on to a winner.

 

Hence why in my earlier post - retrofitting a radio or whatever isnt the solution. Its one - but not the right one. Perhaps think back to context it was taken from - how can the product be used FULL CYCLE - aiding farmers ?

 

Keeping an eye on with interest . .

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Guest Lilith

nice renderings :)

i always welcome any project that has "sustainability" as one of the goals

just worried about the actual "touching the bone" idea, maybe the material could be used as an inner component? or covered with another sustainable recycled material?

i also wanted to mention that

....I can tell you now that the religious Hindu community would not be happy - as cows are regarded sacred. :P

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Guest clark

*** I think you mean HR Giger ;)

 

have you considered colouring the bone- or texturising it, people might take more to a green 'bone' than something that looks so ghoulish- alternatively using bone as a structural component rather than as an aesthetic feature could be a good idea

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Guest ST3

have you investigated the finish that can be produced from polishing bone....is it the same as ivory?because if you were to get a ultra smooth, gloss finish i think that would remove some of the stigma of touching bone. rough un-smoothed bone does give the caveman-"i made this myself" feel.

 

very innovative look at materials....like others-going to watch this thread with interest!

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