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parel

1:1 view on your monitor

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Sometimes it is difficult to gauge scale on your CAD model. Small objects can seem huge because you have zoomed in so close in order to model the feature.

 

I have found the following technique particularly helpful in modelling human scale products, or more specifically - objects and features within the envelope of your monitor screen. Even large products tend to have smaller human interfaces so this tip could be useful to a lot of people

 

Go to one of the orthographic views. First find a reference length. In this case the length of the battery is 106mm

measure1wl.jpg

 

Then I set my callipers to the reference length (106mm)

calliper6bs.jpg

 

Zoom the view to match the length on your calliper. Already I can see that the battery is a lot bigger than I had expected it to be

measurescreen1gx.jpg

 

After matching the length, do not move or zoom your view. Create a new view and name it 1:1 scale

newview4oc.jpg

 

Voila! As long as you dont zoom in, you should be examining a 1:1 scale model on your monitor. Just rotate the viewport/camera to observe from all angles. At the very least this method can save you a few printouts to confirm scale. I use it to quickly gauge the ergonomics of a CAD model before sending to rapid prototype

compare9ym.jpg

 

I believe that these techniques are applicable to Alias and Rhino as well

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That's a useful tip, photoshop does something similar to that, displaying your file at print size (which doesn't really work to be honest..)

I can remember a certain case I made a cad model and it came out huge in rapid prototyping hehe..

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Guest stormelf

so thanks very usefull tip

i saw a macro makes this but i couldnt find it now :)

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Yes, I was told that there was a macro for this in Solidworks, but it was somewhat approximate. Besides, you can use the same technique in Alias or Rhino or most other CAD programs. Its just another weapon in your arsenal:)

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Guest mc_kishore

Thats a wonderful tip, parel for all of us. i had encountered that problem many times. now i can try ur method.

 

 

even we can take print out and keep it for reference

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Guest Delinquent

I'm so glad I've found someone else who does this - I've been using this method for quite some time in other design apps, and every time I got spotted doing it I was ribbed mercilessly! I find it not only very helpful for visualization but instantly illiminates silly mistakes.

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Guest eezydo

Nice Tip !

How about a tut on the surfacing of that Drill ?

Looking at the History on that one , you seem to have created most of the Surfaces in

a different app. -- am I right ?

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BTW.

If you use this technique in Photoshop or illustrator there is an easy way instead of zooming in and out all the time.

 

When you have found the correct zoom level, go to window -> arrange -> new window for ...

Then you have two windows with the same contents.

Then you can use one for editing and the other as a control/overview window.

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