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Guest indy2878

Newbie Sketches

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Guest indy2878

Hello there. I'm a newbie when it comes to drawing. I've been looking around here for a while and I just thought I share 3 of my sketches. Yeah, I know they're not the best. E.g. perspective are a bit off... And I basically just used highlighters for coloring! :-)

 

Basically, 1 of them is a Hybrid-electric concept with the lines first drawn in "Ultimate Paint" then the coloring done in a trial version of Alias Sketchbook Pro 2. I need help in drawing that car in other perspectives.

Then the other car sketch is first done in pencil, then gone over with pen.

Then I drew a random number of sketches of a speaker design. Yeah, I just need help, suggestions, pointers, feedback on my stuff. I hope to improve my basic skills, then I'll possibly buy art markers later...

post-2237-1174964375.jpg

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Guest tiro

:eh: I don´t know how to say it, but you need very, very much practice. I don´t even know where you should start best, since it seems like you have no basics.

There´s nothing good in the drawings. I hope that not all your drawings look like these...I better stop now and let the pros tell you more, before it gets dangerous.

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Guest daveR

You should really start with the basics and not try to draw complex shapes (like a car) for now. Start with learning how to draw cubes and cylinders in perspective first.

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I'm assuming you're probably still in grade school/middle school of some sort?

 

If so, then don't take things too harsh, you're just very young thats all. If you want to learn to draw, try getting a pencil sharpener, some pencils, or a ball point pen, and just practice sketching things out.

 

If you can, try to take an art class at school, and if that doesn't work see if you have any local colleges that teach art for kids over the summer. And if that doesn't work, just go to your local library and pick up some art books that teach the basics.

 

It's important to understand the very simple basics of perspective and how shapes work differently. So don't worry too much about some of the other comments, it's good that you've taken an interest in something and if you start practicing now by the time you're our age you'll be better than all of us. :)

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Guest tom_j_owen

cyberdemon is right. i wish i started sketching at a young age, believe me if you stick at it by the time you hit our age youll be top bomber!

 

if you want to wow your mates/teachers with you sketching. pick up a couple of books and learn from the basics up. dont feel disheartened your very lucky you have the time to build your on basics. this will come in VERY useful as the years go by.

 

just keep sketching mate.

 

tom

 

p.s i used a book called 'presentation techniques' by dick powell back in the day. it might be a little detailed but at least youll know where your aiming for.

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Guest tiro

Ok, when you are young than I´d like to excuse myself :) . Because it is of course normal that you have to learn it first, although I could sketch like this when I was 10 years old or so :) .

But I didn´t want to mention that before because I´m not trained enough to decide if a picture is drawn by a young person or just by an untalented older one.

And my english is not that good too, so I couldn´t estimate your age.

Hopefully he´s actually young. :worried:

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Guest iliffe

Hi, even though your sketches arent to good, theres certain elements in the designs which look good and could be worked with. I'd take advice from the guys one here if you wish to achieve a higher standard of drawing and idea of perspective drawing. keep sketching!

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Guest indy2878

Grade school???? If you're talking about 1992 then yeah! :-)

 

Is it too late to learn?

Anyway, you guys are right! I have a LOT of improvement to make and I've yet to take a decent drawing 101 class. I'm actually pretty much self taught and wish to do MUCH better.

 

 

I think I'll just take your advices and learn from the basics up. I'll go ahead and take that beginning drawing class at school then and sketch may way up. Sorry to disappoint!

 

 

Oh, btw maybe we should have a "beginners" section in this forum. Like have a sticky on top of the section with numerous tutorials... Just my 2 cents...

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We'll I guess it was a bad assumption then. I thought the mixed uppercase/lowercase text in the drawing was a dead giveaway.

 

I wouldn't say it's ever too late to learn if you're just doing this for fun, but obviously if you were trying to catch up from that point for the purpose of a career, then I think it'll still take a probably at least a year or two of real hard work and practice.

 

But starting at the basics is the most important. Heres a decent link to understanding the basics about 1pt, 2pt, and 3point perspective, which is the basis for any drawing a designer will ever put on paper.

 

http://www.khulsey.com/perspective_basics.html

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Guest tiro

That was the reason, why I didn´t want to say that it looks like a kid has drawn the images :) . Now it´s even worse for him because his drawing skills are compared with those of a kid.

But indy2878, don´t give it up even though there´s too much practice to do for you.

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Guest indy2878

Thanks for the honest replies! I'm just curious before I start my drawing class what do you suggest

I SHOULD be sketching/drawing on paper. I know I'm supposed to start off with something like draw

LOTS AND LOTS of boxes in different perspectives, cylinders and all types of basic shapes. But I'm not sure

what I should be aiming for. Like for instance if I were to draw a car then should I draw in the perspective lines

first and then draw in a box in perspective and have the proper ellipses for the wheels? But I'm also told to NOT

draw complex shapes yet so I'm a bit confused. If I were to buy a set of Prismacolor markers would it be alright to

buy some basic colors to start off with including the 'grey's which I've read SHOULD be your basic and main set for beginning coloring? If so what colors should I purchase? Or should I just stick stick with a pencil, kneeded eraser and black pens? Is it worth getting the Design Sketching book from Umea Institute? Can I start off with a book like that or Yoshiharu Shimuzu's Marker rendering books?

 

Anyway, thanks for any advice ahead of time!

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Don't even worry about rendering, and just try to work on making good line drawings in perspective. The Design Sketching book is good, but it might be a little bit advanced.

 

One decent book for fundamentals is "How to Draw What You See."

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Guest indy2878

Hi! I just started drawing a little bit in perspective today doing 1 and 2 point perspective and I also tried to do that one

video tutorial. I wasn't able to complete the entire drawing on the video because my computer screen is rather dirty and/or my computer is too slow to play the video in a decent resolution... :-(

But I was able to draw in some stuff on the right and some extra stuff. All done in pencil, then lined over with black pen. I can't really draw any sophisticated objects, but I'm currently reading, "Perspective for comic book artsists" by David Chelsea. It seems like a good book, but many things to know! Anyway, feel free to critic my sketch...

post-2237-1175132511.jpg

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