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Guest csmurray

Drawing Hands?

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Guest csmurray

Hey, I was just wondering if anyone could give me some tips on drawing hands. I'm just trying to get basic hand forms to show them holding & using products. Basic outlines and whatnot... But I can't seem to get it right without looking at my hand in that exact position. I know I've seen hand drawings where the fingers look all box-like where people we're learning, but couldn't seem to find any drawings like that on here where I could mimic them. Maybe someone can explain what is going on with that style, cause it appeared to work, or any other useful tips. Thanks for any help

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Really it just comes down to practice. The more you do it the more you'll be able to look at your drawings and say "the thumb should be here...this is too long", etc. Theres also no shame in using a photo as an underlay. But the more you do it the more practice you'll wind up with. Having good basic figure drawing is essential, you don't need to be brilliant, but you should be able to rough in a hand/humanoid/head for scale without much effort.

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Guest Vanhahn

draw your own hand.....over and over and over. With and without a product. Once you got that down...draw your hand in inverse...so you dont have to draw the hand you are drawing with. For example if you draw with your right hand and you want to draw a right hand holding a product....learn to draw your left as your right. Have fun!!!!

 

 

-Attila

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Think of your hand as an assembly of block volumes, that's how I learned it at school. Draw the palm of the hand as one volume, notice how the thumb attaches to the side of the main block and then go with the fingers on the top of the block. Keep track of the proportions, sometimes it's tempting to draw the fingers much longer than they actually are because you focus too much on the individual bones..

After you have the hand blocked out, start adding some more shapes to it.. eventually you'll get good enough so that you only need a couple of guidelines before you can draw the actual hand (it's tricky and I'm not saying I'm good at it :P )

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Guest Gappie

I've just recently followed some classes on how to draw scenarios and the usage of a product which also consisted of some hand drawing exercises:

post-10925-1175513107.jpg

Although I was a noob at drawing hands, some simple exercises, like mentioned earlier in this post, helped me to improve my hand drawings. Like the block shaped hand on the right, hands with small products, hands drawn "blind" in one single line (lowerright corner), etc.

 

Perhaps the last exercise I've mentioned, drawing blind, is a bit strange but very helpfull. When people draw hands they draw hands like they are in their mind, not looking at the actual object. What I've did was just looking at my left hand and draw it with my right hand in one single line, without looking at the paper. That way you keep your focus on the object to be drawn not the image you have in your head. I know the method is a bit strange at first but worthwhile when you start with these exercises.

 

I have to admit that its still difficult for me to draw hands but as you can see some simple exercises can quickly enhance your drawing skills.

 

Gappie

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Guest shrednerd

Why waste all that time learning or practicing. Your not designing hands or anything you just need them to help show your concept. So get some clay or an object that is similar to what you are working on. Hold it in your hand. Take a picture. and trace the @#$@#$ thing. Its so much faster and lets you focus on the real task instead of trying to draw perfect hands. Just a thought.

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You're right, of course being able to draw a hand or figure is important for concept development. Taking a picture, printing it, and tracing it is all fine and good, but being able to block it out in 10 seconds with nothing but a pencil is an important skill to have, especially if you don't have all your usual tools at your disposal.

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Guest Sketch This...

I agree with shrednerd. Its a good idea to use a picture as an underlay. That way you can manipulate your own hand to suit the job, holding objects etc. You get realistic results and over time could become used to drawing hand positions and fingers from different angles without an underlay.

 

Its a quick and realistic alternative to drawing it from reality or a mental image.

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Guest RCParry

I have a small collection of hand and head underlays in different positions (either ones I've drawn, or ones I've scanned from "How to draw people" type books)... Usually there is one in the right position for what I need, and it saves a bit of time.

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I have a small collection of hand and head underlays in different positions (either ones I've drawn, or ones I've scanned from "How to draw people" type books)... Usually there is one in the right position for what I need, and it saves a bit of time.

This is right on the money. Lots of focus is put on the wrong things sometimes. Just do what it takes to get the job done the quickest. Hands are hard, but they're not hiring you for your hand drawing abilities. So find the quickest way to do it that doesn't distract from the real thing you're trying to focus on and you'll be fine. Whether that means tracing it, having a preset folders of hands you use, etc... You should be able to block in a general form on the fly, that should be a given.

If you have real trouble, find some sources or get your camera. Take out one day to generate your hand library and get 10 poses that you should be able to use as an underlay for just about any occasion. Then, drawing those enough (you could take a weekend out to just practice drawing those freehand), you'll get better at it.

In illustrator, I developed 4 or 5 hand drawings that seem to be useful for just about any situation that I've need with just slight variations needed as necessary. You can do the same for hand drawn sketches but just go ahead and trace them a hundred times and you'll be able to draw them without tracing. Good luck.

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Guest Skint

Try a book called Drawing Dynamic Hands by Burne Hogarth. Can usually pick one up from a Waterstones etc for about 15 quid !

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