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3d Modeling Challenge - March 2007


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#16 ragde

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Posted 31 March 2007 - 03:23 AM

Guys (and Gals) here is my "easy version"...
I am working on another more similar to the photo of the real seat.
Attached File  EasyVersion01.jpg   58.47KB   31 downloads
Ragde: imagination is always...ON!

#17 Guest_Rop_*

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Posted 31 March 2007 - 02:45 PM

yeah, it looks simply great...i am just started with 3d modelling, so there i havenīt that kind of skills...my main problem is, that i modelled with two basic objects. in the end i wanted to connect them. but you see clearly the line between them...there is no smoth transition...how can i avoid it? i hope you see my point -

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#18 Guest_Daan_*

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Posted 31 March 2007 - 04:34 PM

kewl! I was playin with doing a face... (did them in SW2006sp5)


Zxys, I'm begging you to post the SW file of that! Puh-lease!

#19 ragde

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Posted 01 April 2007 - 02:06 AM

Well, here is a BD of the easy version...

Attached File  NBS_BD001.jpg   117.67KB   20 downloads

Page 2:

Attached File  NBS_BD002.jpg   69.35KB   19 downloads

See you!
Ragde: imagination is always...ON!

#20 Guest_Carbon_*

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Posted 01 April 2007 - 09:21 AM

Well it's way easier to criticize than to actually model something :)
...but from the picture I get the impression, that the front side of the seat should be concave, not convex.

Keep up the good work!

#21 Guest_Perfectude_*

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Posted 01 April 2007 - 11:25 AM

Thanks Ragde as always a nice simple method that does great jobs... sometime simple ways can get you the best result..

#22 ragde

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Posted 01 April 2007 - 03:29 PM

Thanks Jennifer.

Thanks Carbon:
Yes, as I said before, this is just a simple version of the seat (like a warming exercise), I am working on the final one closest to the real model....(I should say, it is not a difficult task however).

ciao
Ragde: imagination is always...ON!

#23 Guest_designerxyz_*

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Posted 01 April 2007 - 05:08 PM

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#24 Guest_sholahskwi_*

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Posted 01 April 2007 - 09:39 PM

Hello there co-designers,i really love to get in on whats going on in here nad would truly love to havr some one lead me through the narrow path of 3D.Thanks.

shola.

#25 Guest_Eric Lagman_*

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Posted 02 April 2007 - 02:19 PM

I decided to use Cinema 4d for this challenge. Sub Division modeling is much quicker for something like this where you can push and pull polygons to create organic shapes very quickly. This could then be taken into Rhino using the T-splines plugin if I needed actual cad data for it. Solidworks can do this no doubt but with more effort to get close to the exact shape that is in the reference photo.

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#26 Guest_robbie_*

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Posted 02 April 2007 - 07:56 PM

Tried a couple of them...


Axel, any chnace of a model up load so we can see how you did these?

Also, zxys, great work on the face models! CAn we see an upload from you too?

#27 Guest_sixfish_*

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Posted 02 April 2007 - 07:58 PM

Anybody else having trouble? This is a great challenge because it really points out the weaknessess of SW as a Surface modeler.

-sixfish

#28 Guest_Daniela hutchinson_*

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Posted 02 April 2007 - 10:40 PM

I decided to use Cinema 4d for this challenge. Sub Division modeling is much quicker for something like this where you can push and pull polygons to create organic shapes very quickly. This could then be taken into Rhino using the T-splines plugin if I needed actual cad data for it. Solidworks can do this no doubt but with more effort to get close to the exact shape that is in the reference photo.


Hi Eric,

I am only familiar with SolidWorks, but wondered why you didn't model it in Rhino? Rhino is the next software package I'd like to learn, mainly because I've been lead to believe it has much better surfacing capabilities than SolidWorks.

On looking at the original photo, again, it appears you are right. The front of the chair does seem to be concave.

Found other images of the stool, via http://www.retromode...irs/chairs.html and http://www.treadwayg.../0901-1000.html

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#29 ragde

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Posted 03 April 2007 - 03:10 AM

Nice research!
Ragde: imagination is always...ON!

#30 Guest_Eric Lagman_*

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Posted 03 April 2007 - 03:33 AM

I am only familiar with SolidWorks, but wondered why you didn't model it in Rhino? Rhino is the next software package I'd like to learn, mainly because I've been lead to believe it has much better surfacing capabilities than SolidWorks.


Daniela,

I thought about doing this in Rhino, but wanted to give it a try with Cinema. I don't have a lot of experience modeling with cinema. I usually only use it for rendering and animation sometimes. This looked like a good opportunity to try it out to see how modeling works. I was pretty impressed by how easy it was to get very smooth and organic shapes once I tinkered with it a while. I had also seen some video tutorials in the past so I had a basic idea of how things worked with its modeling tools. Attached below is a crude breakdown of how I built the chair in cinema. Its like having a piece of 3d clay and modifying it with great control using the mouse. I will definitely use it again for simple
one part models that are not technical like this chair.

To answer your Rhino question. The thing I am not a big fan of in rhino when you want to push and pull surfaces are 1 you get control points all over the place and its hard to tell whats going on. 2 It seems hard to keep the model symmetrical when modifying nurbs by moving control polygons. Rhino is very powerful. I have seen some people do some great stuff with it. I just haven't had the time to invest in it to become super proficient for building something like this. If the next challenge is organic shapes like this though I want to give the T-splines plug-in for Rhino plugin a try. its free right now so cant beat that. You can learn more about it and how it is used here http://www.tsplines....o/workflows.php Looks to be very similar to sub-d modeling which allows for greater control over organic shapes than standard nurbs. In the end try out a few different software and whatever works best for you and suits the need for the particular task use it. Definitely learn to master Solidworks though if you have to choose 1. Its a great program for product designers. It never hearts though to learn one more though to support SW. Rhino would be a good compliment to Solidworks so that is the path I would recommend.

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