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Guest Daan

Extreme Modelling In Solidworks - Ouch!

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Daan, great work but a question.

 

In the original loft are you using a point at the closed end? What are the iso lines on the part like at that point. One the the things that prevents a part rebuilding or shelling are vertex points or convergent points. This is one of the great uses of the fill surface command - for domed ends, as it creates a 4 sided surfaces that is trimmed at the patch boundary. This is an old Alias Studio tools trick for closing off ends of products.

 

Also, when you machine a part with a convergent the cutters can tend to slow around that point so creating a slight surface imperfection. The patch approach usually makes the surface more machinable. If you ever get the opportunity to look at a Class A automotive car body surface there is not a convergent point anywhere.

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Guest qbipq

so, you speak from experience when saying that patch surfaces are better for conical ends?

i haven't heard this till now, and i usually found a lot of people avoiding patches, especially in the automotive industry...

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Guest Daan
In the original loft are you using a point at the closed end? What are the iso lines on the part like at that point. One the the things that prevents a part rebuilding or shelling are vertex points or convergent points. This is one of the great uses of the fill surface command - for domed ends, as it creates a 4 sided surfaces that is trimmed at the patch boundary. This is an old Alias Studio tools trick for closing off ends of products.

 

Hi! Do you mean to patch it after the loft, or use a fill surface from the beginning? Maybe you can show us how you would do it!

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Daan,

 

Glad it was of some use! Sorry I have not gotten back earlier.

Yeah, sure it does not have draft and everything else,.. it's for reference and it was done this way for a reason,.. for opening discussion and thinking for you students. The modeling tools in SW2006 and earlier have some issues with adjacent tangency and C2 in 2006 is not very fun to use.

In SW2007, it cleans up nicer and 2007 also has better features and C2 options.

Actually I always use layout sketches or I should say since SW allows for reuse of sketches, they are the ones I use to to do layouts now. I can always share them or copy/reference them later.

 

I used EcoSqueeze and checked all the remove options.

 

 

Cheers. :)

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Sorry chaps no time to look at this...just finishing work for the day!

 

But to recap, a good domed end is one of the "holy grails" of 3D. Although most apps show these getting modelled very very few can actually create a "proper" surface that avoids convergent points. If you want to see a simlar feature check out the demos on the Think 3 website. ThinkDesign has a capping surface command designed specifically for this kind of stuff. I used ThinkDesign for several years and this was one of the best tools. SolidWorks has the fill surface command, VX has similar, CATIA I believe has a fill surface as well (in fact SolidWorks licensed this from Dassault I am told).

 

As for creation of the domed end the stadard procedure would be to define draft surfaces at the parting line, create the network of curves curvature continuous to these surfaces, define the main body then the capping surface (in SW using the fill command). The idea being you create a guide or guide curve that is curvature continuous to the main body, and create the fill surface using the parting line surface and the main body surface.

 

As I said this is demoed on several websites, including SolidWorks I think (see the hairdryer demo of the back end).

 

As for automotive modelling to Class A standards I only go by what I have seen and done. I'm not an automotive guy but I have worked with a great many over the years and they all tell the same stories....personally I can't see how you can model a car body in FULL detail without resorting to patches. Concept modelling sure can be done quick and dirty but production standard surfacing is a whole different ballgame.

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Give Ragde a pm, might be interesting for the next Solidworks challenge he runs. Of course we already have a mouse tutorial, but this one is a bit more complex.

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Guest kaiza

just starting to get into surfacing properly now...

 

compound surfaces are a bitch! waiting for uni before i switch to 2007 - there are freeform tools in it right?

 

btw daan, nice fading crease line on that there, im tempted to have a crack at it, but only because im procrastinating about my own modeling :)

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Guest Daan

Thanks Kaiza!

 

I don't think the Freeform tools would be much help in modelling this kind of form. It is just not a shape you get by pulling or pushing surfaces.

 

Here's another rendering:

post-762-1175021682.jpg

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Guest sholahskwi

Ouch,you guys are really something else.Can i get a outlay of how you worked this all out.Thanks.

 

Shola

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Guest Carbon
I don't think the Freeform tools would be much help in modelling this kind of form. It is just not a shape you get by pulling or pushing surfaces.

 

 

How did you model the fillet fade?

I've attached a file with a simple example of how I do it.

Basically I just lofted sections with a sharp edge.

Then filleted the edge.

Made a 3D-Sketch from the end of the loft (to get the ending edges as a whole).

Finally a curvature continuous loft to a smooth section.

 

Am I completely off track or not?

fillet_fade.zip

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