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Guest captain

What Cad Package

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Guest pgumprecht

My apologies Captain,

I misread your post and thought you were talking about Solidworks.

I don't have any experience with Solidedge. again, sorry for the mix-up.

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At first...the constraining thing is a problem..but you do get used to it. It happened to me when I started learning it and I have seen other new workers experience the same problems, just have to keep drilling the steps into them.

 

There is a shortcut of keys...thing its on the help folder somewhere..I printed it off and put it on the wall, but admittedly don't use this.

 

Worth checking out this site...prob the best site I have found dedicated to Solid Edge Tutorials...not heaps there..but better than nothing:

 

http://www.geocities.com/segurucool/

 

With regards to constraining other shapes..usually I find the best way is to create a circle and use the construction tool (displayed in sketch mode) to toggle the circle between a sketch and construction line..than constrain that to your two places and give it a dimension than sketch out your other shape within or vica versa

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Guest robbie

Hi guys, I would recommend solidworks. I only just started using it, (installed on company computers DEC'06!). Previous to this I used I-deas and Pro-E and have experience with NX. I am competenet in all and been doing CAD for around seven years now.

 

Solidworks was like a breath of fresh air, very easy to get into and allowed me to employ my current CAD knowledge with minimum training. Don't get me wrong, i'm no pro in SW, but i was able to get up and running far quicker than I expecetd.

 

I agree with Axelrod, you got to have reseller support and have training resources. But to add to this you have to have a user community. Take this place for example, there's lodas of SW users here and loads of great sites to get tips and sample parts from. (check out www.ragde3d.com)

 

I struggled with the same decision at my company, but went for solidworks on Price, ease of use, functionality and the good folks out there on places like this. Also, SW resellers offer the latest training manuals for £20-£30 each and you can download all the training files staright from solidworks.co.uk! Solidworks finally realised we're not dumb and don't need someone explaining stuff that's written unto the trainiing manuals! Good luck with the choice you make, hope I helped.

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Guest captain
Hi guys, I would recommend solidworks. I only just started using it, (installed on company computers DEC'06!). Previous to this I used I-deas and Pro-E and have experience with NX. I am competenet in all and been doing CAD for around seven years now.

 

Solidworks was like a breath of fresh air

 

How did you find Pro E compared? One of the big things i like about SW is you can screw up a model and still actually make the solids, yes its full of warnings but you can fix them as you learn, rather than get frustrated because the software tells you it cant be done but not why.

Was pro E price competitive with SW? Had a demo of proE yesterday, and i must admit that it has a stack of features and doesn't come bundled with a bunch of add in's that i really dont need, like PDM and toolbox. I'll be interested to find out the price.

Thanks for all your thoughts, keep them coming

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Guest JD Mather

If you are currently using AutoCAD you should be aware that Autodesk Inventor is packaged with AutoCAD for free to help those making the transition from AutoCAD to Inventor. Autodesk Inventor Professional also includes a Dynamic Simulation module and a basic FEA based on Ansys and Routed Systems for piping/tubing and electrical.

Inventor and SolidWorks are remarkably similar. You can get Personal Learning Editions of each from your local reseller. Below in my signature you will find similar tutorials for AutoCAD, Inventor and SolidWorks that you could use in experimenting with the user interface. I suggest you also check out the company user forums as I have found that more useful than the VARs.

http://forum.solidworks.com/

http://discussion.autodesk.com/forum.jspa?forumID=78

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Guest smanikot

Hi,

I would prefer SW for modelling of parts.

UG is more in CAM software , u can use it for CNC machining, mainly used by mould people.

 

Both are having sheetmetal and mould features, Core cavity seperation.

Both are good in solid and surface modelling.

U can create para solid in both softwares.

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Guest captain

Well i've pretty much tried them all now. And each do the basic functions of modelling quite well. However when you get more advanced SE and Inventor drop off the pace. You need more mouse clicks and menu navigations to make things like configurations. It is just that simple. SE do not offer an intergrated FEA and the inventor is really just a tease. You can push/pull on a part but you cannot analyse assemblies etc. You then need Ansys to compete with the intergrated COSMOS of SW office. Pro E competes very well also. So at the end of the day SW and Pro E i have found the easiest to use and it will pretty much depend on price as to which software we'll go for

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Guest JD Mather
You can push/pull on a part but you cannot analyse assemblies etc. You then need Ansys to compete with the intergrated COSMOS of SW office.

How much experience do you have with Inventor Dynamic Simulation added to Inventor 11 Professional?

Is full COSMOS part of the base SWX? How well integrated is Ansys if purchased to run in Inventor.

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Guest captain
How much experience do you have with Inventor Dynamic Simulation added to Inventor 11 Professional?

Is full COSMOS part of the base SWX? How well integrated is Ansys if purchased to run in Inventor.

 

IV 11 pro cannot simulate assemblies, parts only and then it is basic static analysis. The engine used for FEA in Inventor is the same as ansys, just watered down so intergration not a problem. Full COSMOS is not part of basic SW package, you need premium seat, but that is more cost effective than buying the 2 seperate or buying IV then buying ANSYS.

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Guest JD Mather
How much experience do you have with Inventor Dynamic Simulation added to Inventor 11 Professional?

 

IV 11 pro cannot simulate assemblies, parts only and then it is basic static analysis.

 

What is the Dynamic Simulation environment in Inventor used for? What is the difference between dynamic simulation analysis of assemblies and FEA analysis of parts? Do you have a link to your website so that I can learn more?

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Guest captain
What is the Dynamic Simulation environment in Inventor used for? What is the difference between dynamic simulation analysis of assemblies and FEA analysis of parts? Do you have a link to your website so that I can learn more?

OK, now you are confusing me! Dynamic simulation is advanced FEA. A part is a part and an assembly is a group of parts. In Inventor you can only make a simulation of a static load on a single part. Using COSMOS you can add static loading conditions on an assembly and therefore see the translation effect between parts for the loading condition. With the more advanced COSMOS, you can add dynamic loads and things like spring elements to make an analysis of assemblies. You need SW office premium to add dynamic loading.

I hope this is clearer for you. Our website wont offer you any insight but just think vehicle suspension and you should get where i'm coming from ;)

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Guest JD Mather
OK, now you are confusing me! Dynamic simulation is advanced FEA.

 

Have you ever even used Inventor Professional? It sure doesn't sound like it. Do you have a name or website that might give me a better understanding of your level of experience with Inventor, SolidWorks or Cosmos?

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Guest Gil'Dashard

Here's a comparison of the Cosmos versions, all are integrated inside Solidworks:

 

Cosmosxpress: Simply part only fea, comes with core Solidworks.

CosmosDesigner: Parts and Assemblies, comes with Solidworks Premium.

CosmosPro: Adds heat transfer, temparature,

CosmosPremium: Adds non-linear

 

Picture attached.

post-10890-1174581259.jpg

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Guest captain
Have you ever even used Inventor Professional? It sure doesn't sound like it. Do you have a name or website that might give me a better understanding of your level of experience with Inventor, SolidWorks or Cosmos?

 

JD, i dont know where you are coming from? I have used Inventor for the 30 day trial period, refer to the start of this thread for more info.

You continue to make bold statements without any real justification and then some outward style of question. What do you want to know? What is your experience? Please tell me why Inventor is better than Cosmos/SW if you are that adament. Your antogonizing approach is unfriendly.

 

The 30 day trial period is very little time to make a complete assessment of any software, but i have 5 years experience with SW and 2 included years using Cosmos. I know this product. Therefore i have tried to compare each against SW and my last 30 days experience using IV has left me with impressions, most of which has been discussed above. The intergrated IV Pro FEA is limited, you cannot make simulation on assemblies, static or dynamic

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