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Guest ourclassics

Product Design Vs Industrial Design

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'Wikipedia' says this:

 

Industrial design is an applied  (The creation of beautiful or significant things) art whereby the  ((art) the branch of philosophy dealing with beauty and taste (emphasizing the evaluative criteria that are applied to art)) aesthetics and  (Click link for more info and facts about usability) usability of  (An artifact that has been created by someone or some process) products may be improved. Design aspects specified by the industrial designer may include the overall shape of the object, the location of details with respect to one another,  (A flag that shows its nationality) colors,  (The feel of a surface or a fabric) texture,  (The sudden occurrence of an audible event) sounds, and aspects concerning the use of the product  (The branch of engineering science in which biological science is used to study the relation between workers and their environments) ergonomics. Additionally the industrial designer may specify aspects concerning the production process, choice of materials and the way the product is presented to the consumer at the point of sale. The use of industrial designers in a product development process may lead to added values by improved usability, lowered production costs and more appealing products.

 

Product design is focused on products only, while industrial design has a broader focus on concepts, products and processes. In addition to considering  ((art) the branch of philosophy dealing with beauty and taste (emphasizing the evaluative criteria that are applied to art)) aesthetics,  (Click link for more info and facts about usability) usability, and  (The branch of engineering science in which biological science is used to study the relation between workers and their environments) ergonomics, it can also encompass the engineering of objects, usefulness as well as usability, market placement, and other concerns.

 

Product design and industrial design can overlap into the fields of user interface design,  (Click link for more info and facts about information design) information design and  (Click link for more info and facts about interaction design) interaction design. Various schools of Industrial Design and/or Product Design may specialize in one of these aspects, ranging from pure art colleges (product styling) to mixed programs of engineering and design, to related disciplines like exhibit design and interior design.

 

 

In the US, the field of industrial design hit a high-water mark of popularity in the late 30's and early 40's, with several industrial designers becoming minor celebrities.  (Click link for more info and facts about Raymond Loewy) Raymond Loewy, Norman bel Geddes, and Henry Dreyfuss remain the best known.

 

In the UK, the term "industrial design" increasingly implies design with considerable engineering and technology awareness alongside human factors - a "Total Design" approach, promoted by the late Stuart Pugh (University of Strathclyde) and others.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industrial_design

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Guest DesignRocks

Thanks Waikit - exactly correct!!

 

That the end of this topic?? Guess so!!

 

Over and out.

 

P.S. One is not better than the other (Pardis-b!!!), they are just different –it’s a case of personal taste.

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Guest ourclassics

Cool!!!

 

I have found one interesting aspect. SO far to my knowledge, no grad school is ofering industrial design alongside product design. They offer only either of two.

Am I right?

 

Also I feel, people here can list down the undergrad, grad schools offering product design. It will be a boon for people like me who are looking for the right Product Design Grad school to study (in US andelsewhere)

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Guest charly_senn

To throw my two pence in.

 

I graduated from Brunel University (UK) in 2002. At that time the courses on offer were;

 

IDT (BA Hons) - Industrial Design and Technology

PD (Bsc Hons) - Product Design

IDE (BSc Hons) - Industrial Design Engineering

 

The difference between the top two are that we (I did IDT) got to make more stuff and the PD people did maths! lol Apart from that we were pretty much the same.

 

Hmm, workshop versus maths - think I made the right choice.

 

Just had a look at the new site and see MORE design courses;

 

Brunel | Design courses 2005

 

 

Oh yes, I call myself an Industrial Designer because I think is sounds more important !!! lol

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Guest ourclassics

charly_senn: Cool that your school is offereing both streams of design. Since your school is teaching both the courses, I am sure that they must have enlightened you about the differences in the three courses esp in the areas of kind of job you will end upto, market value, etc. Can u please share your thoughts. :)

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Guest evolve
To throw my two pence in.

 

I graduated from Brunel University (UK) in 2002. At that time the courses on offer were;

 

IDT (BA Hons) - Industrial Design and Technology

PD (Bsc Hons) - Product Design

IDE (BSc Hons) - Industrial Design Engineering

 

The difference between the top two are that we (I did IDT) got to make more stuff and the PD people did maths! lol Apart from that we were pretty much the same.

 

Hmm, workshop versus maths - think I made the right choice.

 

Just had a look at the new site and see MORE design courses;

 

Brunel | Design courses 2005

 

 

Oh yes, I call myself an Industrial Designer because I think is sounds more important !!! lol

 

Hey Charly Senn, I do believe your school is linked with SFSU (San Francisco State University) study aboard program.

 

SFSU have the same system but our department is called Design and Industry. (SFSU DAI)

 

Anyways, I call myself Industrial Designer with the emphsis of Industrial Technology (Product Development + Manufacture Technology).

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Guest charly_senn

Hi Guys,

 

been crazy busy for the last 3 weeks so I haven't ventured into the forums for a while.

 

Ourclassics, I'd love to say that Brunel explained all those things, but to be honest they didn't! As a BA guy I was happy because I got to spend so much time in the workshops making stuff whereas BSc were doing Maths. I can't complain at that.

 

As for value after University etc. I'm not sure really. It's hard enough getting a job let alone anything else. Everything comes down to experience and a good portfolio - I think less of the degree, unless you want to be a design engineer, when really you should have done Engineering at Uni. Having said that, I think Brunel does Des/Eng anyway!

 

Evolve, yep, we have a link with you guys in San Fran - had two good mates go there for a year in 2000/01. Andy Mole and Chris Howard. There was a whole load that year.

 

Charly

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Guest ditman

my course is Product Design. we do design in the sence of both innovation or design for the mass market. examples of some of our classes are marketing, entrepreneurship, 3D design, design optimization, tools and technology, materials, manufacture, creativity, design and project work based on company breifs. It was explained to us that we would be the bridge between the designers and engineers and in some cases do both jobs! Industrial design was explained as leaning towards the aesthetic side of the design process where as product design was based on the way in which the product physically works, the way the user can interact with it as well as the way it looks, we're based more around the engineering side (even though the engineers hate us cos us new guys are showing then up, ha ha) Any industrial designers correct me if im wrong, it wouldnt be the first time!!!

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Guest Robomod

I'm a senior at San Jose State University, and I will get a BS in industial design next fall. I have an extra semester id upper-division GE classes.

 

I'd say that Industrial design is the practice as a whole, and the specfic design of product falls in there. Like automotive design- car are products. And, product design is much more specific to someone looking through a school catalog.

 

Also, the role of the industrial designer is changing into one of adapting and solving. I think that's where product design was derrived.

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Guest a_curious_dizzy_snoopy

from what i gather, product design seems to be more about cosmetic deisgns e.g the design of a glass, while industrial design seems to be more about function and mass production e.g the design of medical equipment. both are fairly similar but product design will deal alot more with marketing and industrial design will be more enginning based

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Guest vladka

i am interested in the stanford product design masters program. has anyone applied to it?

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Guest vicky

As far as i am aware, in ID we give more thought to solve the given problem by sketch, by concepts and by some rough models, thier we don't count much design constraint as our emphasis remains on solving the problem and getting thing done.

but when it comes to PD we emphasise on mechanical concepts which go in product and their design constraint comes in picture, their only we'll face the problem of having less space,processing defects(in case of plastic products like sink marks, flow marks etc...) and then we go back to ID we change our concept by here and there we make it little bit flexible.

 

like this things go and when the final products comes out we find that it has nothing to do(exceptional cases) with the original shape which we thought earlier.

 

Don't be angry this is the problem which i faced .. ;)

 

correct me if i am wrong..

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Guest Tall Jewish Guy

I live in Melbourne, Australia.

 

I am applying for the following courses next year:

 

---------------------------

 

1. Industrial Design/Mechanical Engineering Double Degree - Monash University

 

2. Product Design Engineering Single Degre - Swinburne University of Technology

 

---------------------------

 

These are the only two courses available for this stuff in Melbourne. As you can see with the top course, it is a full double degree with a qualification in Mech Eng as well as Industrial Design (...and obviously the hardest course to get into). The second one qualifies you with a "Product Design Engineering" degree which isn't as in depth as the straight mechanical engineering degree I think skipping a year or two of maths, dynamics etc.

 

You should look at courses such as the ones above if you are interested in this field. Another user, "SunnySunshine" is at my school and applying for the same course. You can see his work is very good especially for only school level. Me I'm going in with nearly no experience except a 30-hour short course in 3d modelling.

 

My best bet for the original poster, read the forums, do a short course and see if that appeals to you, and then go and apply for a university degree whereever you can find it.

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Guest RPdesign

I think industrial or produt design are the same thing with diferent ages .... in 60's to 90's Industrial design but in 90´s the product design is a therm that come to show ,,, and stay like a new word to enchore that more objects are related to ...

 

sorie the englis, but i tried to express my self ... i am a student to... an that quetion is a problem to us all...

 

ps, trie to see some curses of industrial design and produt design all the program are the same or similar ... here in portugal my contry is like i say to you...

 

 

regards

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Guest Taylor

There is no difference. My school changed the cirriculum from 'Product Design' to 'Industrial Design' recently to be politically correct.

I believe that the trend is leaning toward the 'Industrial Design' label, probably to suggest deeper ties into Engineering... however, unless you have an Engineering background, an Industrial Designer has no real mathematical knowledge in this field, just experience from life, which can take you far enough to discuss the requirements of the particular project with an engineer. This fact shouldn't belittle designers though, if engineers designed the world... imagine the chair you'd be sitting in now.

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