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Guest molested_cow

Are you only as good as your sketching skill?

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Guest molested_cow

I cannot deny that I tend to pay more attention better looking sketches. Not those flashy ones that hurt your eyes, but those that convey the ideas effectively.

 

This means that the ideas of the less impressive sketches suffer. I was just talking with my friends about effective sketches, and how this guy has great sketches but because he doesn't care to write notes to explain them, the sketches become useless.

 

To me, sketches are the only bridge between the designer's thought process and the viewer. If the viewer needs the designer to explain his/her sketches, then the sketches are practically useless. If that's the case, why draw at all?

 

I think the topic sentence doesn't really describe what I say. I have seen of good designers with not so impressive sketching skills, but generally, I do think effective sketches is a big part in design. It makes the process a lot smoother.

 

What do you think?

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Guest desagree

to me it`s important to select the ideal visualisation method according to the current task. sketching/hand drawings are only one tool. f.e. some shapes are described best with a mockup and others by a CAD rendering.

 

i think there are various types of purposes for sketches. main and most important function is to inform colleagues/clients/etc. about the own thoughts/ideas during design process.

I totally agree with you that these sketches should be as "clear" as possible.

apart from that there are also sketches that are`nt meant for the "public" but only as a tool to understand and develop a form/function. sth. like a calculator for a merchandiser. they dont need to be understood by anyone but the draftsman him-/herself.

and last but not least there are those "atmospheric" sketches,which are used for final presentation to inform about/advertize the design.

they can be meant for information (=precise) or publicity (=emotional).

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Guest littlecog

I have never been a very competant sketch artist and in my job as an in house designer I have neither the time or the need to do highly rendered sketches. I confess that a lot of my drawings are very crude 'thumbnails' done on the whiteboard. As soon as a concensus is reached with my co-workers it's of to the computer and my trusty Solidworks. To be fair bicycles are paricularly well suited to 3D cad because sketching all those wheels and componants every time you want to show a new frame design would drive you nuts. Much better to have all the components in a 3D library to drop into the sketch when you need. My point being that sketching is just one tool in the tool box of a designer. Can't find a wrench? Then use the pliers instead. I do quite a bit of writing and verbal presentations to make up for my 'spider scratchings'. As long as you can communicate the concept how you do it is not so important.

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I agree with littlecog. It's strictly a tool. Depending on where you work will govern how important it is as a tool. Lots of consultancies sell mostly concepts (sketches). Majority of their work doesn't go to production, so for them the concept sketches are the most important part. So they tend to place much greater emphasis on sketching skills because their commitment mostly stops there.

In other places like in-house corporate, getting to the final product as fast as possible is the most important thing. Absolutely no need to take that time to do slick renderings, unnecessary because you know you're idea is going to be picked. You don't need the slick presentation horse and pony show, or 50 different concepts. You find something that's appropriate and fits your goals and you get to finalizing it. So in those areas you just draw well enough to be quickly understood, then it's off to the models or cad.

Guess it boils down to who you're working for and who you're selling to. If you're in a consultancy, you better be good with sketches and other presentation forms, because you're competing against other consultancies. In that situation you have to stand out so good pres. skills are mandatory. If you're in-house at a company that manufactures it's own goods, you're not competing with anyone, you don't have to do as much to "sell" the idea or impress. You need to be able to get to a good final product quickly.

Either way, doesn't hurt to have as many tools at your disposal as possible. But don't let lack of slickness discourage you.

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Yup, agree with what's posted here.. it's as much a tool as anything else. I try to remain as allround as possible for now.

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Guest mola667

IN my modest opinion sketching is one of the most important tools for a designer, not only to comunicate to others the object of ur design.

Sketching is the best way to give expression to an idea in ur mind, even better than computers, for that reason will survive to PC, Macs and Silicons. Also is the best tool for impresing the artistic point of designer, that is not a resolve-problems tool more in the office, but an artist too.

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Guest El Ente

Sketches are important but not critical... are just a tool to communicate what's inside my head to the one that wants to buy my ideas.

 

If I'm not good at sketching I could make some 3d-models, 2-d models or make a text explaining most of my projects, and even hire a drawer to make my project more visible.

 

To me design it's not about drawing or sketching, it's about having good ideas, working with them, and knowing how to make them real in a good finished product (appropiated matherials, forms, proportions, scales, etc....)

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Guest MacPhail

It is really dependant on the individual. I agree with El Ente and others that it is not that critical though. If you are not a great Syd Meade style sketcher, you will find other means to convey your ideas that suit your strengths. In a corporate environment, you hardly get time to blast out da perties. More often than not, I rough the idea out and do a quick mop up to solidfy it. If I am lucky, I add some grey or color.

 

The quality of the sketch can be misleading though. I don't know how many portfolios I have looked at over the years where I have seen incredible sketches with no merit or thought (sketching just to be slick) and inversely, sketches that are pretty poor that have a valid idea to them.

 

Thumbnails usually work for me to sort things out but I do try to label everything. You never know who will see them. I have had too many experiences where sketches have been grabbed off my desk and shown to marketing/sales prematurely not to do it.

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Guest papicas

I couldn't agree more with El Ente.

My opinion might be a little doubdful because my sketching isn't very good. But I do belive my ideas are. I use sketching mainly to comunicate with myself, seeing what works and what doesn't. It wouldn't cross my mind to show a sketch to a client but for every project I do 3D virtual models.

I remember when I was in school and the preliminary part of the project development was drawn: I looked at some collegues' drawings and my projects seemed louzy. When it came to final presentations, with 3D drawings, they weren't that impressive, the projects were quite "banal".

I think the problem with seeing sketching as the most important tool is that you worry too much with your drawing looking good and not enough about your project. And the client will realise that in the end.

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Guest raptor

i would like to disagree abit here.

sketching is a skill., not just a mere tool. it is us, designers who have this skill - sketching. i wouldnt call myself a designer if i cant even sketch well. its a basic way of representing ideas and conveying messages across. beyond that, 3d CAD, modelmaking, rapid prototyping then functions as tools.

 

sketching to me is the fastest way of representing ideas. just a quick pencil sketch, top up some markers and thats it. what do u think?

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Guest lucylucyfer

Hi all , well , frankly i do not good at both , not sketch , worse 3d or cad ..... usually i just hand the crude works as my homework , and i am really confused , is that really that imp?

i mean as a designer , ...hmm....you can express your own idea and then can do a simple sketch to show your main idea, is that also ok? coz my teacher blamed me a lot for that.. i am too lazy ...

but i do think what the most imp is idea , is creative mind , right? in my school these copydogs can got the high scores , so.........i am confused what should i do ? and i really ready and determin to study harder , so can u gimme some suggest?

and i do agree with the poster hr .

Lucy

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At some point idea has to translate into reality. It used to be that this realism had to be achieved as far back as the sketch phase. But digital allow the massagin of an idea all the way into 3D CAD or 2d cad or hand made models.

Lucy you cant suceed if you dont have some way to compensate for bad sketches. Sketch more.......

...and dont be lazy :)

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Guest lucylucyfer

thx parel , i will do it i think , or i have to do it lol

and i visited ur page , good one , admire you ...lol, good job!

at last thx again ! gang ba de ne (to everyone )~~~~~ ciao

best regards

Lucy

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Guest newt @ MWE

as others were saying on the importance of sketching, it depends on what company you ARE working for. however, i think of it as it depends on what company you WANT to work for. also, what do you want to do and what role do you want to play in your career.

 

if you really don't like to sketch, than just do CAD and digital, but be prepared to be a rendering farmer or a CAD monkey. there is a good chance you will not have a creative position within an established company. This is not 100%, but by the majority it is. (I have a feeling I am going to get some rancid comments for that) .

 

if you don't like sketching because you are afraid you're not good enough, you have to practise and expect to make mistakes. no one on this forum came out of the womb a talented artist and sketcher. it takes a whole lot of practise and mistakes to learn, just as anything else. you should find some people on here who are great sketchers and ask them if they can post some of thier old stuff, from when they were learning. it could be a huge confidence builder.

 

also, as others said, sketching is a tool. likewise, CAD is a tool, prototyping is a tool, 3D modeling is a tool, research skills are a tool and computer rendering is a tool. it can only benefit you to have more skills and potential employers will be looking for who can offer the most to thier company.

 

hope that helps

 

newt

 

ps, well said parel

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Guest Bucyrus

Good sketching has a lot to do with materials. I used to make sketches with pencils with lead such as 2H because I did not like the smudging and smearing of softer leads. Then I learned that image is primarily conveyed by shade tone and not lines. I have seen designers sketch and reject ideas, not realizing that the line-only sketches they were using failed to convince. Portraying a glass sphere as a circle comes to mind. The problem is made more worse by the fact that a line drawing often gives a convincing illusion that it conveys the full effect, leaving the viewer unaware of how much they are missing.

 

At the worst end of the performance scale of paper/lead combinations is something like average copy paper and 2H lead. At the opposite end, I think the most ideal combination is 140-300 lb. cold press or hot press watercolor paper using lead no harder than HB, and a soft gum eraser. You can get your linework adjusted because when you erase, the paper cleans up completely, yet you can always tell where the line used to be for reference.

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