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Guest Warran

Pd Course Funding Issues

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Guest Warran

Hi

 

I would like to say how impressed I was by this years show at Bournemouth, however on visiting the young designers show, I was appalled by the lack of space being rented for the Product Design course by Bournie Uni (blink and you would have missed it). Brunel, Northumbria and even our very own Bournemouth arts institute had six to seven times our space, these Unis even provided brochures to visitors, oh and train fair for those showing work. If Bournie Uni wished to combat falling student numbers and the reputation of the Product Design course the least they could do is promote us more.

 

While I am at it ('get off your soap box') the current policy of increasing research undertaken by the university will damage our course, with lecturers spending six hours teaching and another 12 performing research. Bournie Uni only generates about five percent of its income from research and should concentrate on what it does best.

 

It is mainly our own motivation and the workshop staff which will get us through the final year but matters like these are distracting.

 

Thanks for reading and any comments would be appreciated.

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Guest pencil

I know you posted ages ago, but i've only just seen it so here goes.. I was a student at Bournemouth graduating in 06 capd. I cant really understand your rant.

-you say you want more space. space is nice but the show wasn't cramped so whats the problem. It does not add much value to the show. What is your suggestion for such a space in Bournemouth? And what would you fill it with?

 

-Universities are research and teaching institutions. Without proper reseach they are just colleges. Bournemouth needs a credible aceademic reputation to compete. The staff are just moaning about thier new research targets, and some students are then taking the their view. The reality is that students benifit from a department where there is a lot of staff research. The money brought in by research is in fact the money that goes back into the university that buys new stuff - government grants are minimal. Staff stay up to date, and don't drift off into the unstructured world of academia

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Guest sllihkin

Mmm I guess if most of your work is digital (CAPD) then you won't much care about space. I think the BU PD course is mainly 'manual'/physical so space is needed to show the work.

 

Actually only about 5-10% of funds are from research at BU and I'm afraid that academic research is often/usually unstructured (and sometimes irrelevant), leaving staff struggling to keep up with what is really happening in the industrial world! Sadly the reduction in staff/student contact time ( 18 - 6?) will probably not help most students learn how to design. Unless of course you can learn design from a book!

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Guest bgp3te

is that 18-6 ratio bournemouth university?

 

I think the course is great, although I am just a first year i have a fairly limited view, but nevertheless i think the PD course is pretty good and you get out of it what you put in aswell.

 

I mean theres nothing stopping students using their spare time to learn extra skills is there?

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Guest pencil

In response to sllihkin dont think your points are entirely accurate. (in my view of course)

 

-Every course wants a bit more space! My response is that product design exhibits in the sports hall have not been cramped in. the shows' content always expands to fill the room. I think the money would be poorly spent in hiring somewhere like the bic for a bit more space.

 

-As for research, bournemouth doesnt do much so it is obvious that there is not much money generated. The key thing is research money above the break even point is capital entirely at the universities discretion to use. They can do what they want with it, unlike government money. This is why it needs to grow.

 

Research is a loose term. The idea that staff are just having thier time wasted by having to think of irrelivant stuff is crazy. In reality the research is usually in collaboration with companies or other universities on colaborative projects. To a distinct objective and timeframe. The results of which are published and presented at conferences. This raises the universities academic profile as well making better lecturers. Workshop staff are not expected to create research papers! I also dont see how its related to staff/student ratios.

 

The new research emphasis on bournemouth has resulted from the new vice chancelor. - She is the ex-vice chancellor of southampton university, which certifies her quality. She knows whats needed of a top university and its staff in order to get the best.

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Its a common issue these days, newcastle university in Australia dropped its Industrial Program which was picked up by a tertiary instituion (TAFE) in Newcastle luckily. 4th years now attend the uni for the course, but it had the highest UAI (secondary school score) the year before it got dropped. We were told we were costing the uni too much money and they had to restructure accordingly. 2 other courses got axed, one being herbal medicine and something else along those lines. A tonne of smaller subjects got axed, but nothing as severe as the I.D. program.

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Guest sarah...

PENCIL...

 

The complaint from the other person was not about the room at Bournemouth Uni in the sports hall, it was about the amount of room they were allocated at New Designers. The stand Bournemouth arranged for ND06 was very small and cramped!

 

Thanks :)

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Guest tom_j_owen

when i was at uni, the uni paid nothing at all...we had to raise every penny. from floor space to logos etc. i think its like that for a few more uni to. if you dont have enough cash supplied, go get it! life isnt handed to you on a plate all of the time.

 

 

rant over!..lol

 

tom

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Guest fnewallsmith

Hi Guys,

 

What did, the first post mean about Burnemouth being back on its feet?

Did it once have a good reputation for design?

 

Im still unsure as to weather the course i am on Product design,at Burnemouth is really that Poduct Dsign related?

 

Do people agree that for example in the PD world in some areas a useful skill would be learning how to make blue foam models, whereas we learn nothing of this. But instead we produce a highly presciion enginered vice which a lot of students lack the ability to finish?

 

Another example perhaps would be the choice of projects given to students, in our second year we had a "technical project" to produce a machine which made bubbles and to use technical calculations to back up our design.

Most calculations were innacurate and generally students with calculations did badly, and students who made test rigs to see if their concepts would work got a lot better marks?!

 

For me in the real Product Design world people will make test rigs, and if they need to use applied, maths they will, but on a project like this was there a point?

 

I know product desgin is a very varied, but i am unsure weather our course focuses in the right areas?

 

Hope this isn't too off track... just wanted too see what other people think?

 

Does any one have any pictures of the show is there a website? I couldnt make it would like to see some pics!

 

Felix

 

3rd yearPD

 

www.felixdesign.uk.com

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Guest :: s a r a h ::

Hi Felix,

 

Product Design at Bournemouth is a great course and gives you much more preparation for the 'real world' than many other product design courses.

 

I've just graduated from BU PD this year. When we exhibited at New Designers in London it was a great chance to see other universities work. Whilst some of it was excellent, some of it was lacking. Many universities do not encourage working prototypes and upon speaking to some of the students from other places they hadn't really much of a clue how it would really work or be made etc. How will they design a real product without having to ask for a lot of help?

 

At Bournemouth you get taught all of the skills you will need to see a product from start to finish. Applied technology is really important as is making test rigs. You can not choose to do one or the other, everything has to be done simultaneously to create an appropriate design solution. Obviously number crunching theory is not going to give you the exact same answer as test rigging, this is why you need to do both. Blue foam modelling is a good skill to have but not the be all and end all...if you can sketch well you should be able to communicate your ideas well enough.

 

Having had a few interviews this week, companies really like the fact that we cover the technical side of things too as they know that you can work on your own to create a fully functioning attractive product. Bournemouth Uni PD has a good rep with companies as far as I have heard.

 

If you wanna take a look at the show we had this year there's some on facebook :-)

 

You should have faith in the work your taught as it is all very valuable stuff! Hope the placements going well and good luck in your final year!

 

Sarah :-)

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Hi Felix,

 

You will come out of it being very employable.

 

Product Design is a wholistic view to designing products. A mix of creative and technical design to produce innovative, 'feasible' and 'valid' product designs.

 

You need to have a creative mind, be able to make aesthetic models/mock-ups, work out technical calculations and produce accurate prototypes.

 

If you can undertake detailed precision engineering using a lathe/milling machine/vacuum forming, then seriously you can handle making a blue foam model! You shouldn't need to be taught this.

 

>> Grab blue foam & cut/sand/file!

 

I made several foam models to help with the aesthetic form of my final year product. Making precision protoypes really gives you an appreciation for real world manufacuturing in terms of understanding tolerences and how parts fit together.

 

My final year product has been commented on for its build quality, design, aesthetics and for being extremley ready to manufacture. So the course gives you the foundation for effectively designing complete products. The Whole deal.

 

Not just a pretty picture on paper. Product designers aren't 'skinners' designing swish casings for products, we design, engineer and manufacture the whole product.

 

I think the course could perhaps have a more innovative and updated approach in terms of the projects, however, you really can't knock the technical side of things.

 

Otherwise you might of been better on a BA in Industrial Design.

 

 

Catcha

 

Ronnie.

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Guest bgp3te

its nice to hear some input from past students on the course. I think the course is great personally, im currently a 2nd year undertaking the jaguar project haha. I think the lectrurers give pretty sound advice as a whole.

 

Its good to know you have gone on to be very sucessful, gives us 2nd year students somthing to look forward to!

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