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Guest yeddeync

Chrome objects?

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Guest yeddeync

i did a bunch more in black, and they turned out much better. But I'll just post this one that i reworked. add water to give reference to where the blue reflection is coming from. Advice/tips? thanks

post-23-1096417336.jpg

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Guest Random Designer

Maybe less 'fuzzy' with the blue. Try streaks of blue rather than areas of blue? If it fades away it looks a bit like a 'brushed' metal finish, rather than gloss.

 

And I'd try adding back some gray next to the black and white. Maybe re-draw the sketches in sharp definition!

 

Just some thoughts. I think I feel some rendering coming on...

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Guest yeddeync

thanks. I will definitely try that. yeah...i thought the blue look a little awkward to, just didnt know why. thanks again.

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Guest shoji

chrome is a "cool" (blue hues) colored metal. i like to think of it as an absence of color and just a cool-washed reflection of the environment around the object.

 

the black lines you're seeing in the object are compressed reflections of stuff around it. to learn how to draw chrome i would recommend starting with basic geometric shapes before you try faucets and compound surfaces. this will eliminate any trouble with design/perspective/reflections of chrome in chrome, etc.

 

try a cylinder. maybe use rulers and ellipse guides to get a nice outline of a cylinder, then make some photo/scans of it so you can practive abunch on the same page and not worry about redrawing the image.

 

then try a cube. then a sphere. then a cone.

 

each shape has a specific form, and each reflection will follow that form. reflections follow the form. i'm noticing that some of your reflections begin to waver as the descend down the form, so this would indicate depressions in the material.

 

a good way to study this is by doing something my teacher taught me. buy one of those christmas ornaments that is completely reflective and circular. study how the reflections follow the form in it and use this to get a better understanding of how your line work will indicate these forms. also try noticing anything super reflective around you in your daily life. door knobs, car grills, silverware, kitchenware, etc.

 

when you render chrome, it's often done in an "ideal" environment. place the object in a desert with nothing around it. you have the horizon line, the sky, the sun, and the ground. all of these will be reflected in the object and will only differ in placement based on the eye level of the viewer.

 

begin rendering chrome with these basic colors and once you feel confident with the material try introducing it in another environement (like the kitchen).

 

also, ask yourself what makes different metals different visually.

for example you should get in the habit of asking questions like: what's the difference between highly polished silver and highly polished chrome and highly polished brass and highly polished copper?

could you render these if you wanted to? what would you need to keep in mind if you did?

how do the values differ?

which metals are considered "warm" and which are considered "cool?"

 

what about shiny vs. matte materials? what makes these differ?

 

big word: contrast

 

someone mentioned to go black on your sketches, but instead of just going black and thinking "yeah these look better," it would be best to understand why it looks better.

 

contrast is a huge indicator of reflective materials. if you look at brushed aluminum you'll notice that there is less contrast, and even less in a matte finished plastic. keep this stuff in mind when you render the materials and when you observe from life. it will help create some fundamental analytical processes in your head that should ultimately make you a better designer.

 

i hope this helps and cheers.

 

rock on with the drawings! mileage (practice) is the best way to improve your ability.

 

here is another post from a friend on rendering chrome. hopefully he will add some images to backup his text. :wacko:http://forums.pensketch.com/viewtopic.php?p=211#211

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Guest desagree
......so sorry that you have to look on it.

:):):D

funny expression! but I agree to yeddeync that it really is not that bad! But still to me it doesn`t look like chrome, more like carpaint..

there are some simple rules for reflecting surfaces:

 

try to imagine the environment of the object you are drawing. decide for two colors (1 for ground 1 for sky. later also 1 for object itself )

now just ask yourself whether the current surf is orientated to the ground or to the sky? depending on its orientaton you can easily define the color it has to reflect. this step already helps the drawing become 3d and to explain the form.

 

next thing is light. usually in drawings you assume a natural sunlight coming from top left/right behind you. that means that all shadows fall behind the object. all surfaces orientated to the light are much brighter than those orientated to another direction.

 

these basic rules are true for all kinds of surfaces. the difference consists in the amount of reflection and the texture of the object-

i think that`s it for the beginning. you can do best practice with cylinders and cubes. don`t worry. it`s not a matter of talent but exclusively of practice.

 

EDIT: ok, i did`nt see that there is a page 2...

Edited by desagree

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Guest Random Designer

I think it's the sharpness of your edges. Maybe some thin highlights along the edges?

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