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Guest ASP!S

My Illustrator Bronco

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Guest ASP!S

Hi there :-)

 

It's my first post here. I'm just overwhelmed with the amount of tutorials and useful tips people are getting here. It's like an amateur designer's Holy Grail ;-)

However, I've realised that there are not many Illustrator tips here. Since I'm going through an "Illustrator-frenzy" phase now, I would be grateful if you could give me some tips or point out mistakes you see here.

 

This is just an exercise in Illustrator, especially the glossy areas. Can you help me? :-)

 

post-4293-1137288758.jpg

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good stuff- why dont you post a few screen shots of the work in progress? What techniques did you find useful for the different areas f the render?

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Guest nate

yokio miyamoto http://www.bekkoame.ne.jp/~yukio-m/index_e.html

 

these are all done in illustrator with the mesh and pen tool. i found his work in the illustrator wow book

 

 

 

amazing stuff ASP!S - not sure it's worth all the time though - be easier to learn a 3d modeling program and model it than do it in illustrator - how long did it take you??? -

 

it's great, i can see no problem-

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Guest Thathertz

i dont know much about car styling, but I really LOVE this concept. The refernces to the early Bronco's is fantastic. Great updated look, i would say a very nicely inclusion momre rubust features without being too "Hummer" and less delicate looking the the Mercedes G-wagon.

Nice work.

 

I can work with 3-d packages, and I only wish could do this.

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Guest ASP!S

Parel: basically I used only gradients and traditional vector fillings (I was only starting with blends then - I used them only for the shadow of the car and on the bumper). I started with the objects that are the closest to the viewer and then worked all the way up, to build up the perspective, but I guess I should have done something to make it more visible (maybe to let the colours fade?)

 

Nate: thanks for the link, this guy is just INCREDIBLE. This is the thing where my skills are equal to 0 - gradient meshes. And what's more annoying I can't find any good tutorials on the subject (I'm not counting the ones that show you how to make a curtain :) )

I have this incurable attitude to 3d modelling programs - I just don't like the results that you can get using these (except of some really rare talented people like Dangeruss)

This thing took me about 18 hours to complete, which is not that bad I think.

 

Thathertz: that's actually Ford's design :-)

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Wow, great sense of reflection and material, must of done alot of life painting or drawing? You're crazy, I don't think it needs improving, just do it faster. Also maybe use some colors, lights on the side.

 

How did you get all the proportion right? Reference underneath?

 

With mesh you can do curve gradient but you do the same thing as gradient, just build on top if you cant get the effect you want. Here is my mesh render awhile ago, the top part was another object.

post-282-1137369200.jpg

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Guest nate

ASP!S

 

illustrator tutorials on what you have done don't exsist - i have looked everywhere, do you have any links - ????

 

i got the illustrator wow book from the libaray, but it's so basic.

 

and 18hrs is great. do you have any other stuff?

 

did you start with a pic as a refference? a quick few pointers would be great!!!!!

 

cheers

nate

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Hot stuff. For anything practical you don't need to do any more unless you're doing it strictly as an illustrator. You should then focus on being able to do this quality faster.

The benefit of doing this type of thing in a 3d model, is that when working professionally, higher ups will always want to make changes. The client may not like the view so extreme so they'll say change the view. Then you'll have another 18hrs of work. In 3-d, you can just rotate and re-render, much faster. If you're doing it for yourself, do whatevers most comfortable for you. But for business, do whatever technique will give you the look you want but most importantly...with the ability to easily make big changes without taking much longer. Lots of clients look at good 2-d renderings and think you can just rotate to a different view like in 3d and get another view quickly. They don't understand that difference, that every view is a brand new painting from scratch.

Good job though. I only use IL for pen tool line art and layout, so other than that, can't really help than to give great time-saving key commands that will increase your drawing speed.

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Guest Thathertz

heh ;) Well it's a beautiful design.

 

Looking at the photo's you realize just how good the render is. Nice worK.

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Guest ASP!S

Bowlofnoodle: Yeah, I also think it took a little bit too much time. Even now there are some things that I didn't do, because I had no patience left in stock ;-) And a coloured thing would be a challenge (however it is not greyscale, it has certain hues - blueish, greenish and so on). You can find the reference pictures in Parel's post :-) And yeah, this is what I would love to learn - the friggin' meshes ;-) BTW: cool rendering :-)

 

Nate: Unfortunately I didn't find any good tutorials on Illustrator - that's why I had to figure thing out myself. It was kinda like feeling my way in the dark ;-) At first this application really scared me off, it was laying on my shelf for almost a year. But when I finally got myself to try it, I fell in love from the first sight ;-)

You can find the reference pictures in Parel's post :-)

 

Skinny: You must be right, but I don't think I am THAT patient to learn the 3d rendering programmes ;) But if you could give me some tips concerning speeding up in Illustrator, I would appreciate it :-)

 

Parel: Yeah, I wish it was shorter. And one day I will do something like this including some more creative work, not only trying to copy thing from the photo ;-)

 

Thathertz: Thanks :-)

 

My biggest problem is that I am not really able to tell from my sketch, how the light and shadows will be cast on the object, that's why I prefer to use reference. I was reading some of the art tutorials from "all over the net", but I think I'm totally crap when it comes to rendering an object with my own lighting :/

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Yeah, practice doing renderings from your head, completely different battle there, much harder.

-The only thing I know about meshes is that you use a solid shape, then go to gradient mesh. You'll be given a grid on the shape. Every point where the lines cross is a spot where you can specify a different color. You can also add points using the pen tool like you would on any other path to give you more points (finer mesh). The color from one intersection will smoothly transition to the surrounding colors on the other points. You can then move those individual points to kind of "sculpt" the shape.

-Quick IL speed tips. Don't use the layers palette, memorize and drill these key commands and their opposites (lock/unlock): Lock, Hide, Send to back, send all the way to back, Group. On a mac, keep your thumb on the command button all the time. From any tool, you can go back to the arrow tool instantly. I prefer the open arrow. You can select just a part of something or hold down command+option and you'll automatically select a whole. Organize things in group hierarchies the way you would with layers and sub-layers, etc. Then if you command+option click you'll progressively go through a group one sub-group at a time. Makes it real easy to look and grab whatever you want without having to remember what layer it's on and unlocking it, etc. Basically these commands let you do everything you would on the layers palette to see and arrange things, but it's all key-commanded and you don't have to remember what thing is on what layer and hit those little buttons.

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Guest ASP!S

Thanks so much, Skinny :-) Oh God, you're the one who made this awesome tutorial on Illustrator/Photoshop renders!!! I would like to be such a good designer one day :-)

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Thanx for the compliment. I just did that render real quick to show I could do photoshop in my portfolio. You can get really good results with proper observation and layer strategies. I've worked on some projects where the renders were completely passable as the real product, client had no idea that we didn't actually prototype the product. Using material scans helps tremendously.

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Guest menappi

where can i learn how to use the mesh tool to achive that 3d effect?? thats crazy.

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