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parel

Solidworks Demo For Industrial Design

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Guest slowhand

Hello everybody,

 

I'm new to this board. So let me first of all say: I'm very impressed of the stuff you're doing here. And very special thanks to parel leaving a link to this thread in the german solidworks forum of www.cad.de

It is really great stuff. Thank you for sharing this.

 

As you all may recognize in the near future - there will be depth of focus in renderings with Photoworks using version 2006. For high quality you have to wait - but it's impressive.

I will do a short session on the trade fair CAT.pro in Stuttgart (04.10.2005 - 07.10.2005). I hope that Stefan Berlitz will upload a copy of this to his website: http://solidworks.cad.de like last year: http://solidworks.cad.de/kh_pw2005.htm

 

Kind regards,

Ralf

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Guest ar_yankie

fabulous presentation u can b a avery good teacher..................thanks it was a real good part of this forum n today i really feel that i m not mistaken by joining this forum

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Guest Studebakerhawk

I wanted to try this tutorial, but the files you say are all I need only give me the mouse_curves.sldprt. I cannot get individual BMP files in order to follow your instructions, although I can see them in the Manager. Am I missing something?

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The part file should contain the orthos as well. You could save the sketch and crop the views like I did as well

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Guest Studebakerhawk

Hi Parel,

 

I can't save the bmps to the clipboard, but I can save the sketches. However, I SW2205 will not allow me to paste the sketches in a new part. I've worked with Solidworks since 1998, but I don't understand why no-one else has had trouble getting started! Am I just dense? - NO, don't answer that...

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I dont cut and paste. I save the different views separately and then in a new sketch go Tools>Sketch tools> Sketch picture. This is how you put a sketch underlay into your files. But you should not have to do that

since the file should have the jpegs.

 

I just realsed that I had not put the correct pull down menu path my bad. Studebakerhawk Thanks for bringing that to my attention :D

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Guest raghu

hi all I have joined this forum to get a good knowledge bout product design, plz do help me know how to work with surfaces,and make use of commands effetively ,in solidworks, can some one share models containing surface work, i need to practise them,

thank u

RAGZ

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Guest Namssorg

First, thank you for the much needed ID-based Solidworks Tutorial. I've been looking far and wide for one, and it's nice to finally find one that is so thorough. (Nice inclusion of setting up solidworks, explaining what things do etc)

 

I do have a few comments. My first 3D package was Rhino-- and then I dabbled in Pro/E Wildfire a bit before starting to learn Solidworks. On one hand, this is an easy tutorial to pick up for someone coming from Rhino. However, one of the main reasons I spent some time learning Pro/E Wildfire was to have far more control over elements within a model. So I am wondering-- is there a better way to model this mouse, perhaps without using as many splines? Perhaps achieve a similar model that has more sketch-based constraints, rather than free-flying spline anchors?

 

I was able to model a videogame controller in Pro/E-- using "Method 2" that you have on the first page-- except I used dimensionable arc-lines instead of splines. I love being able to use the 3d curves, but unfortunately it's very tough to dimension them, or pass them onto engineers.

 

Still-- VERY HELPFUL tutorial! I'm still poking my way around SWX 2006 interface, and this was a major help!

 

PS. I'm SO happy you included a grippies lesson in this tutorial!

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;)

Dimensionable arc lines are the bread and butter of Solidworks and proE. You create a curve by string a set of tangent arcs together. Could you explain "sketch-based constraints" Most of the splines in the model are created on 2d construction planes.

 

I like splines because they are easier to control and create nicer surfaces and transitions. They are dimensionable in 2006. If you look at the curvature graph of a multispan curve made with arcs compared to splines, the arcs have a jumpy curvature graph.

 

But I am sure that you have plenty if reasons to like arcs (just like the majority of Solidworks users) It is far more universal and perhaps more self explanatory. My manager and shop guys still think in terms of arcs.

 

Welcome to the forums! Thanks for a very cool first post. Pass the word on about this site to your friends.

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Guest evolve

WOW.. thanks parel. i just found out this thread!!! How did i miss this, doh.

 

i'll do a quick sketch tonight and work on solidworks and upload my work shortly.

 

thank you for the tut.

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Guest Namssorg

Thanks for the reply! I suppose you're right about the arcs-- I love using splines but they were frowned upon back when I took a Pro/E class-- perhaps they're becoming a bit more acceptable and easy to use these days.

 

I did think of something else that might help a bit in the tutorial. You do such a great job of 'getting us started' but the thing I find most difficult is "planning out" how I am going to model something. It's a very tough transition for those of us to whom Rhino is second nature... where we can pick a view and go-

 

I am wondering if you (or anyone reading this) has some good suggestions on how to plan your modelling attack. This is the part that takes me the longest, (Especially when i try to model something using Method 2 in this tutorial) I always end up with sketches that I'm not quite sure to do with, and feel like I'm using far too many steps to do something simple! But maybe it's something that I will get used to over time.

 

It would be nice to see the thought process that went on between that first spline you walk us through, and the file that we download to start the tutorial.

 

And thanks for the warm welcome! I'm spreading the word!

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Guest raghu

HI ALL ,

I WAS UNABLE TO GET THE DEFORMATION OF THE SIDE STRINGS PROPERLY, SO CAN I EXPECT A BETTER RESULT BY A BETTER TECNIQUE

THANKS

 

 

 

Ragz,

MCAD DESIGN ENGG

CONZERV SYSTEMS

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Guest evolve
Hello,

 

The tutorial file was already filled with all the sketches but there are 3 of them which I don’t know how to make myself. It is the curves that are present in the 3 planes and are used as guide curves for generating the side surface of the mouse. A section of that curve is on the front plane and also on the lofted top surface. How did you make this?

 

Thank you,

Antonio

 

PS. Your tutorial was extremely helpful

 

 

antonio_meze,

 

Those sketches are made with Intersection Curves and splines. Ill try and provide some images later, but basically an intersection curve is created between two surfaces, at their intersection. In this case it is the intersection between the trimmed surface and the Construction Plane.

 

Then I created a spline curve with three points. This spline was then constrained with the following relations:

1) Tangency relation to the Intersection curve

2) The middle point had a Pierce Contraint with the 3D sketch

3) The end point was Pierced to the footprint of the mouse

 

i guess i'm not alone in trying to recreate from the start. Hey Parel, i know i've pm you on this and i've tried using the intersection curve and even looked it up in the help files. Got it working using a 3d sketch (which created a new sketch file) but still can't loft it. Must be my relationship isn't right because you have a pierced contraint and i have set the relationship to coincidents).

 

I'll wait for your post on this and hopefully i could play catch up from here on.

Thank you

Mike

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Guest patywagon

can someone go over how to make all the curves that were already made in the downloaded file?

 

i know solidworks well enough but surfacing is new to me

i would like to know how you made there to go on with the tutorial

so i can learn how to do this

thanks

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Patywagon,

I hope that you have been able to figure out how to make most of the curves. Curve creation is the most important part of surfacing. For the most part the sketch planes here are pretty standard fare. However the intersection curves are somewhat puzzling, so I will go through that here, as it is repeated in all the section curves.

post-313-1132280806.gif

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