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Solidworks Demo For Industrial Design

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You should end up with a screen that looks like this (minus the doodles) Tomorrow I will go over the modeling strategy that we will use. It is very important to think about how you are going to model an object and your overall strategy before you actually start using Solidworks

 

We went over some house-keeping today. This might be tedious, but dont worry things will get a little more exciting the next few days.

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Guest iddidy

Hey Parel,

 

Thanks ever so much for this tutorial, I have not been able to find many surfacing tutorials for solidworks. this one looks great! keep them coming!

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Here are some approaches that we can possibly take. Approach 1 has the disadvantage of having a degenerate point where all the isoparms come together. This can make the surface quality difficult to control. We will probably have a hybrid of Approach 2 & 3 taken to another level

post-8-1094416932.jpg

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Over the next few days, I will try and break down how to make this mouse. It is composed of surfaces that are later knit, shelled and split into various components. This kind of method is what is referred to as a "top down" assembly. The actual construction method turned out to be a variant of Approach 2. My sketch shows a crease in the mouse. I decided not to model it because first it would have taken a little longer to think through and explain and second-it wasnt looking all that good :rolleyes:.

post-8-1094490214.jpg

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Guest littlecog

Here is a saddle I modelled in Solidworks using the same method as your approach No1. I think it is a very fast route to creating complex surfaces but I sometimes struggle with maintaining tangency. Approach No2 takes longer but is more reliable I think.

post-8-1095287591.jpg

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The following part deals with inserting backgound bitmaps to use as underlays. Also the curve formed at the interface of the red part and the grey plastic is important. So we will define the character line by means of a 3D curve (3D sketch).

 

Solidworks uses flat planes called construction planes to create flat curves (2D sketch). These curves are then used to create geometry. The default construction planes are the Right, Front and Top plane. Designers used to Rhino and Alias can be confused by the construction planes. The default constuction planes are not actually views. Refer to Solidworks documentation to learn more to pan, zoom and dolly the camera.

 

<span style='font-size:14pt;line-height:100%'>Inserting Background Sketches:</span>

1) Click Right plane.

2) Insert >Sketch, to start a sketch on the Right plane

3) Within the sketch Tools>sketchTools>SketchPictureto insert a background sketch. Insert a cropped view of the mouse in the right hand view. I used Photosop to crop out the different views. It is useful to crop each view as close to the bounding envelope as possible.

4) Draw a line that passes through the origin, and dimension the line to 120 mm. This line will be used as a reference to scale the background bitmap

5) Double click the bitmap. Drag handles will appear that will allow you to scale the jpeg to the 120 mm construction line. position the highest point of the sketch over the sketch origin by dragging and dropping

post-8-1095689624.gif

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Repeat the previous procedure on the Front and Top Plane. It is convenient to position the jpegs so that the baseline passes through the origin.

post-8-1095689723.gif

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Creating the 3D sketch:

 

In addition to 2D sketches, SWX allows you to create 3D sketches. which are splines with control points that can move in three axes. They are very useful to define character lines/ bone lines of a product.

 

1)insert>3DSketch

2)in the right view use the spline tool to trace over the bitmap. It defualts to create a flat curve in the Right Plane.

post-8-1095689927.gif

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Similar to Rhino and Alias you can move the control points in the Top View to match the bitmap. (Hint: Hit Spacebar to get default views like left , right , top etc:)

post-8-1095690044.gif

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Solidworks Rant Time:

The spline functionality is still not fully implemented. The spline control handles of 3D sketches are VERY buggy unless you constrain them horizontal, vertical or tangent to a construction line.

 

eventhough you cannot use spline handles to the same degree in 3D that you can in a 2D sketch they are stiil a big leap over 3d splines in 2004. The curves will just be a little heavier because you use control points to define curvature rather than the spline handles

 

Edit: Do NOT pull spline handles in 2005 3D sketch. They are uncontrollable unless they are constrained horizontal, vertical or tangent to an existing 2D or fixed 3D line (even then you have to use the property box to input length) This has been corrected in 2006 though so...phew!

post-8-1095690427.gif

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This is what you should see when you open the file from the beginning of the tutorial. You will see a trimmed surface loft and a bunch of curves. I wanted to start with just curves, but the side section curves are created with curves that are tangent to the trimmed loft surface. The side section curves are also constrained to pierce the 3D character line that we previously created

post-8-1099753499.gif

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