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Solidworks Demo For Industrial Design


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#1 parel

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Posted 02 September 2004 - 06:09 PM

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Files that go with this tutorial can be downloaded here: DOWNLOAD
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Many IDers are not familiar with the surfacing in Solidworks. It might be handy to go through a simple product like a mouse to walk through how you might go about modelling in solidworks. Over the next few days I will go over how to go about doing this in Solidworks.
I sketched this concept over lunch so the design might change over the next few days hehee Hopefully we will have a helpful series

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#2 Renzsu

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Posted 02 September 2004 - 06:16 PM

This should indeed be interesting, I do all my modelling in rhino, so I'm curious to see if Solidworks can keep up a bit.

#3 Guest_Dot Kite_*

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Posted 02 September 2004 - 06:42 PM

Hello parel,

Well, great initiative !

Keep on providing us with nice stuff....!

Best regards

#4 waikit

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Posted 02 September 2004 - 10:06 PM

parel, thanks a lot again. i finally can start learning solidworks!
:D

#5 Guest_Dot Kite_*

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Posted 02 September 2004 - 10:15 PM

Dear waikit,

Well, SolidWorks is very easy to use if you ever had any experience with other parametric modellers. If not, I still believe that is easy to use once you understand what the "Parent/Child" topic is, and once you learn to model with the planes and axis! So, don't worry . . .put some energy to it....and for sure you gonna love it!

Greetings

#6 waikit

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Posted 02 September 2004 - 11:04 PM

dot kite, thanks for your support. just need more motivation to start with solidworks. this coming tutorial of parel will certainly motivate me, because it will be first posted on this forum :D right parel?

#7 Guest_wgc_*

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Posted 03 September 2004 - 03:49 PM

Nice tutorial, keep em coming...!

For me, solidworks is very intuitive especially if you know other modelling software. (I use Alias and Rhino mostly, since that's what they had at my school.) You can do a BOM and exploded views with a couple of mouse clicks in solidworks. But it's also rather expensive, especially if you are a student.

Also, check their website- they team up with local training companies in many areas to offer a free intro class. All you have to do is sign up. I got a limited trial version cd of the previous rev to take home (unfortunately, it wouldn't install though).

#8 parel

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Posted 03 September 2004 - 04:06 PM

Today I will go through initial set-up for ID in Solidworks 2005. (We can figure out some work arounds for earlier versions as we go along for those with earlier versions) When you use SolidWorks it initially feels as if you are drawing with crayons or something. You free-form draw a thick blue-lined circle wherever you want it with no constraints (very unsettling for those used to pure parametrically driven models). What a novice program! It even looks like crayon. However, the simplicity isn't indicative of an underpowered program, but of intuitive interface. If you want an unconstrained circle somewhere, SW won't argue with you, but go with the flow.

You can soon learn a whole palette of tools that allow very complex geometry in very few steps. However, Solidworks out of the box does not show all the tools that I use on a consistent basis. I will show you how to customize the layout for ID purposes.

This is what I see when I initially open Solidworks. There is not a whole lot to look at. This is because the interface subtly changes depending on the type of edited document

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  • startup.GIF


#9 parel

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Posted 03 September 2004 - 04:08 PM

Type Ctrl+N to create a new document. Click on Part. The opening screen will not look like the one below. I have removed all the commands and toolbars, so that I can start out fresh, and only show common commands. To remove a toolbar click on the edge of the tool bar and drag it out into the display area. This makes the toolbar a standalone dock-able window that you can close out.

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  • part_document.GIF


#10 parel

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Posted 03 September 2004 - 04:10 PM

Click Tools -> Customize. A dialog box opens up that looks like this. Click the following options within the toolbar options. This opens up the toolbars with commonly used commands

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  • toolbars_customize.gif


#11 parel

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Posted 03 September 2004 - 04:16 PM

Your screen should then look like this (hmm I cant seem to upload the image..will try later)

#12 parel

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Posted 03 September 2004 - 04:18 PM

Next drag and drop the new toolbars into the grey areas surrounding the display area to clean up the display. Arrange the toolbars as you deem logical. Your screen should look something like this:

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  • cleaned_up_screen.GIF


#13 parel

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Posted 03 September 2004 - 04:21 PM

We still don’t have all the commands that we need. Click Tools--> Customize. A dialog box opens up that looks like this. Go to the Commands tab, and in the scrolling Category menu go to Sketch. Add the commands that I have circled in the menu to the sketch toolbar on the right of the screen by dragging and dropping

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  • sketch_customize.GIF


#14 parel

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Posted 03 September 2004 - 04:22 PM

Scroll down to Features Category and drag and drop the extra commands. I will explain what most of these tools do later in the tutorial.

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  • features_customize.GIF


#15 parel

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Posted 03 September 2004 - 04:25 PM

You can also optionally remove commands that you rarely use by dragging and dropping them into the display window. This does not work during regular use, only during customization

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  • remove_views.GIF





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