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Guest Telos

Vt Formula Racing Concept Rendering

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Guest Telos

Hey Everyone,

 

This is my first post here. Just found this forum and I love everything I see. I got into doing car concept rednerings for fun about ten months ago. It all started with Husseindesign's rendering tutorial (which is awesome).

 

So, I'm a mechanical engineering student at Virginia Tech. One of my friends is on the formula racing team and asked me to do a concept rendering of their new car design. All I was given was a printout of the frame design and some specific things they wanted included. They're going to pitch this to the Lexus racing team to see if they can get funding from them. Anyway, it took me about 15 hours from pencil sketch to the final rendering. The reason it took so long is because they kept wanting to change things. Here's what i finally came up with:

 

formulaconcept2withbg.jpg

 

All my other rednerings can be found here:

 

http://filebox.vt.edu/users/talberi/art.htm

 

It's pretty easy to see the progression from my earlier work to my newest. I'm pretty happy with the progress I've made so far, but I know I still have a long way to go. I'm currently looking into getting into marker rednerings, so if anyone knows of a good set of markers to recommend or any good marker tutorials, it would be greatly appreciated.

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Guest ScottieB

Nice sketch! Well worth the time. The top one is easier to understand the form for me

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Guest cmegens

don't wish to repeat myself this much but: the perspective is off

 

Can we make a song with this line? maybe on Mc Hammer's "Can't touch this"? that would be a far nicer way to tell this

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Guest Telos

Yeah, I know it's off. I did the original (the Lexus concept) a while ago before I really got serious with fixing my perspective problems. In order to get this project done on time I just used the original to do the Intermet concept. The client likes it a lot, so I'm not too worried. if I was to do it again from scratch, it would be a lot better.

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That almost says it all. Only designers notice those small perspective issues in general. Most of your clients will be non-designers and as long as they get the point and they aren't focusing on the wrong thing because it's blaringly off, then you did well.

If you're planning on putting it in your portfolio to get work as a designer, then you should absolutely go back and fix it for sure. But there's nothing worse than spending hours on something just to make it technically perfect to your peers, but then the client breezes over it in a second because it's just not the feel they want. They don't care that you executed the complicated upside-down see through view perfectly. They'll be glancing at your concepts. Remember that in the pro field when you get out, you have to balance the benefit with how long it takes to do something. If that ratio isn't great enough (like 20 hrs for something a client will only glance at for 2 seconds), then you have to adjust your efforts to stay in budget.

But definitely keep up at your accuracy, it can only help when you get much better at it and can do it quickly and easily.

Good job, keep up the good work.

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Guest Robert Curtis

As already stated, the perspective is the main detractor in your rendering; specifically you have the major axis (the widest diameter) of the wheels aligned vertically, whereas they should follow the diminishing perspective of the rest of the car, i.e. angled around 5º CW from the vertical.

 

Some pointers from Scott Robinson:

 

e_2.jpg

 

ell_ex_7.jpg

 

ell_ex_8.jpg

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Guest Telos

Yes, I know about the perspective, but as I stated earlier, this is from an earlier drawing that i did before i got serious with my perspective. I've also seen these Scott Robertson drawings about 50 million times. I know you're trying to help, but please read my posts next time before you reply.

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Guest se7enfingers

Hey,

i'm sure everyone here is just trying to help eachother as designers. So my suggesttion that maybe you should take crits with an open mind and always look from the positive side. If you already watch the Scott Robertson over 50 million times, then why there's still some flaws on your drawing?

 

Take crits as vitamins for your improvements ok :)

 

Keep up the works.

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There are a lot of old-school marker rendering books out there. I also think gnomon has some dvd's with quick marker rendering, feng's I think. Personally, I'm slowly getting rid of my markers for photoshop sketch renders. Only 3 toned grey scale for markers now, just to make things pop more than b+w lineart. Do the rest in photoshop and you get to undo.

-Markers are simple, start light, finish dark.

-Work quick for broad areas of color so the edges bleed together in an even tone.

Let one area dry, then go over it for a darker shade of the same color, useful for shading something blue for instance. Let it dry once or twice to get 3 levels of blue for the shading out of one marker.

-Use color pencils for some details, white for hotspots, b+w for parting lines, color for material textures + patterns.

-Old-school guys colored with greys, then go over with color pastels, makes for nice gradations and rendos but instantly dated look and it'll mess up your black id turtleneck sweater.

-Use black sharpies for hard black details and linework. Don't use the same black marker type you're coloring with, it'll bleed and get real fuzzy.

Good luck, happy rendering.

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You must be the render king in your Mech Eng classes :) Are you sure that you dont want to switch to the dark side and embrace your inner IDer?

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Guest Telos

se7enfingers: Yeah, I went a little overboard there, but I pointed out that I was using a previous sketch from before I really studied perspective, so that's why it's off. My perspective has been much better lately :).

 

skinny: Thanks for the marker tips! I'm really getting into my greyscales right now and love working with them. I'll be getting a 48 color set of Prismacolors tomorrow too, so I'm really looking forward to using those. My biggest problem right now is learning shading and reflections. I've been studying tons of car photos (mostly from dieselstation.com) and every time I walk through a parking lot I study the cars I walk by to see how the light reflects and such.

 

Parel: Haha, thanks for the compliment. I'm currently in my senior year, so switching majors at this point won't work. I am looking into grad school to get my masters in ME, but I may look into possibly getting a minor in ID at the same time. In retrospect, I should have gone to ID, but I'm pretty happy with ME too. I mean, if someone were to offer me a job designing cars, there would be no way I could turn that down. It would be my dream job.

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Not trying to be discouraging but save your money. Here's what I used in school in '95:

48 prisma marker set + color pencils, 10pack cool grey, 10 pack warm grey, sharpies, prisma pastels, white guache for highlights, etc, benfang marker paper, vellum, etc. Results- very overworked renderings and credit card debt.

What I use now: Refillable 20% and 40% tria markers (nibs are changeable also), base colors- blue tria, old prisma red, green, orange, purple for specific popouts, ultra fine and fine sharpie, whiteout, 12pack colored verithin pencils, regular white bond paper, staedtler lead and holder-4h and lead sharpener. Works much better and is much cheaper.

Get color markers as you need them per project. I still have most of my same markers from school, just dried up with many unused colors, pastels are only 1/4 used. Everything you don't use is money wasted, and remember that markers dry out, so you have a bit of a time limit. My greys recieved the most use, so they got replaced often.

What I use the most today is the 4h pencil, 20+40% grey tria, uniball micro, and plain paper. Colored verithins if working on how different parts go together, so they need to contrast each other. Anything more, get to photoshop, with the right brush settings you can still have a marker-like look but without the fumes and expense but with the ability to undo.

But you'll be amazed at what 2 grey markers can do to really pop out your b+w lineart by hand.

Good luck

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Guest Telos

Cool, I'll definitely keep all that in mind. I guess I'll use up what I have (just found some cray-pas from middle school that i might try out) and then see how it goes. If I don't find a decent passion for it, I'll just go back to Photoshop. I just thought I'd give a new medium a try and see where it took me. I also didn't realize that the markers dried out. How long does it take for a typical marker to dry out?

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All of the markers are different. And depends on your use. I tend to recap whenever I sit the marker down to keep them fresh. Lots of capping and uncapping during one page, but then again, I'm kinda anal about stuff like that. I had a marker set from faber-castell, can't think of the exact name now, most of those just started leaking on their own in the stand, I hardly ever used them. The old prismacolor with the stripe graphics, their nibs suck and frey and dry out easy. The newer ones are better. I really like the tria nibs, they keep their shape and the markers are refillable. Just make sure you put some clear tape over the color info on the barrel, your sweat will rub all of the color off of the marker graphics.

Try getting 1 or 2 markers of different brands and experiment. That's how I found my "kit". Do test pages to see the interaction between the sharpie, marker, pencil, and all other combos, which whiteout stays white going over sharpie and which turns purple, etc.. Just draw lines and circles for media tests. Test paper also, marker on epson photo paper (the coated stuff), makes markers really bright, almost flourescent with light markers, on vellum markers are dull and you can't go over hte same spot to much or you'll streak and remove color in weird ways, just experiment with various combos of things to get a kit that works right for you and your style. Good luck

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