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skinny

Illustrator To Photoshop Tutorial

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Hey, I love the tutorial but wouldnt it be great if anybody amongst you (gurus) could write a tutorial that would direct to beginners like myself. I have no experience of Illustrator and there are no webstites where I could find any tutorials for Illustrator. Maybe I am way out of line, but its just a suggestion.

 

An illustrator tut is coming, maybe in the next week or so.

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skinny

 

gr8 tut

 

any chance of a screen shot of a close up of ur layers???

 

Here they are. This is a fairly simple one, but everything is broken down. If I want to change the general shading I can do it easily without messing up the parting line shading, etc.

 

post-565-1121635887.jpg

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Guest kotik

spaceship2angle21ft.jpg

 

I will eventually get it as good looking as the one in the tutorial. I just will !!!

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Guest nate

hey skinny might be a stupid question

 

but you say put your highlights and shadows on seperate layers??

 

how ?? if your using doge and burn don't you need pixels on that layer or do you copy that layer??

:)

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If you use dodge+burn, copy the layer and do it on the copy so that you'll still have the original close if you mess up. For this tutorial I didnt' use dodge+burn, just white and black airbrush.

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I will eventually get it as good looking as the one in the tutorial. I just will !!!

 

Practice tracing the coca-cola logo, that will get you good with the pen tool. Maybe some other product photos after that. Then you have to practice on stuff that comes from your head. It's a lot easier to look at something and try to get it to be the same. That won't teach you the skills you need to learn. Besides, you may end up copying the same mistakes I made in my drawing so it's best to do it on your own ideas or trace existing stuff to learn. Good luck.

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Just learned a new trick, you can bring in the illustrator lines into photoshop as just paths. That would save a nice number of steps to get the different parts to line up seamlessly. Always learning every day.

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Guest Lumina

Hey man,

 

Just wanted to thank you for this tut, amazing stuff and extreamly easy to follow along. Like a few others, this tut was the reason I joined. Keep it up!! And thanx again!

 

-Lumina

 

ps- also glad you added a close up of your layers, that helped alot to see how you organize stuff (since I'm not too keen on doing that with my layers...after seeing how much it really benifits you in the end with revising stuff, I couldn't see any other way of setting up layers. Thanks! ;) )

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Guest evolve

i use layers for different areas i will delete or add into.

 

I've sometimes create everything in one layer but found out the hard way from time to time.

 

Anyways, creating in layers isn't so bad. Just takes practices

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Guest Dmjones

Hey if you are doing those selections in photoshop with the majic wand tool its even faster if you do this:

 

Set up an action that expands by 3 pixels, and then contracts by 2 pixels and adds a 2 point feather. You can set up a function key to do it real fast. Then you will achieve what you have shown, but it joins areas together that show they have a part line in it the came out of the design process in illustrator.

 

To make this action, first select an area, then press record on the action. Do your feather, expand and contract and stop the record. Works a treat. I show my students this and its gold.

 

Dave Jones

Lecturer in 2D Industrial design Sketching and Rendering

Massey University

Welllington

New Zealand

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Guest evolve
Hey if you are doing those selections in photoshop with the majic wand tool its even faster if you do this:

 

Set up an action that expands by 3 pixels, and then contracts by 2 pixels and adds a 2 point feather. You can set up a function key to do it real fast. Then you will achieve what you have shown, but it joins areas together that show they have a part line in it the came out of the design process in illustrator.

 

To make this action, first select an area, then press record on the action. Do your feather, expand and contract and stop the record. Works a treat. I show my students this and its gold.

 

Dave Jones

Lecturer in 2D Industrial design Sketching and Rendering

Massey University

Welllington

New Zealand

 

 

i'll have to try that out. Thanks for the tips.

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Guest proedesigner
Hey, I love the tutorial but wouldnt it be great if anybody amongst you (gurus) could write a tutorial that would direct to beginners like myself. I have no experience of Illustrator and there are no webstites where I could find any tutorials for Illustrator. Maybe I am way out of line, but its just a suggestion.

 

If you haven't seen this site, you should check it out.

http://www.sketchpad.net/photoshp.htm

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Illustrator Question: How many of you designers use layers in Illustrator? Does anyone know how to use them well?

 

I only use layers in photoshop. In illustrator it takes waaaaayy too much time. My replacement for layers in illustrator is to instead use "group hierarchies" as I like to call them.

Group things the way you would have them in layers or sublayers or folders, etc. It's easy to just open-arrow select one thing, or open-arrow-shiftclick up the group until you get the whole group or just any part. And you group with a key command which is faster than making a new layer.

 

Group, ungroup: command-g and command-shift-g

Move things up and back with command-bracket. All the way up or back is command-shift-bracket.

And locking and unlocking: command-2 and command-shift-2.

Hiding and showing all: command-3 and command-shift-3

 

Those combos takes care of having to look at layers and clicking on ones to find out what's on it and sliding them back and forth, etc. Much faster to group, lock, move and hide with key commands than clicking the icons in the layers folder. And much faster to key command than mouse clicking.

 

People i work with hate that idea, always use layers. But I'm the fastest and most organized in illustrator out of the bunch. i think my way works better. For photoshop, definitely use layers.

If you really need to get to specific things in illustrator, click the grey triangle and you'll get a breakdown of all the groups done in my method as "kind of like" layers. You can then turn them into normal layers at the end if it helps others look at things. To me it slows you down too much with no real benefit that you don't get the other way.

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