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Guest mono_transistor

Top 10 skills for emerging ID graduates

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Guest mono_transistor

Hi there. I'm from México, and this is an article that I found time before.

I think we can update it.

In my country is very hard to be an Industrial Designer, because the same industry don't consider us for the product development.

Anyway, I'm very interested to see your point of view about which skills must have an Industrial Designer actually.

 

 

 

 

Top 10 skills for emerging ID graduates

 

(According to leading Australian ID consultancies September 1998)

Survey conducted by University of Canberra Industrial Design Department

 

1) Sketching and freehand drawing ability have to be excellent... designers have to be fast and fluid, not slow and considered. No polished rendering now required, but basic quick sketch rendering still worthwhile. FAST and loose is the key.

 

Rendering skills are rapidly being surpassed by software: 10 years ago: Final renderings with pastels and markers 5 years ago: Final renderings with Photoshop and Illustrator Now: Final renderings with Photoshop and Alias or Pro/E + 3D Studio Max

 

2) Good model making ability in foam, plaster, resins, MDF board including at least an awareness of Rapid Prototyping technologies such as SLA, SLS, LOM, silicon rubber castings, investment casting, soft tooling options etc.

 

3) Have to know a Vector based package (such as Freehand or Illustrator 7) and a Raster based package (such as Photoshop or Photostyler)

 

4) 3D Modelling skills in 1 high end package such as Pro/E, Alias, Catia, I-DEAS or to a lesser extent 1 mid-range package like Solidworks 98, Form Z, Rhino 3D, 3D Studio Max etc

 

5) 2D CAD skills in Autocad, Microstation or Vellum as a fall back position.

 

6) Self starters with good presentation and interpersonal skills (able to think on their feet at a client meeting and make a case for the concept), report writing (researching and understanding a detailed brief, documenting the design decision process, QA documentation) any industry experience a bonus (work experience, prior employment, field trips to industrial sites such as car manufacturers, plastic injection moulding plants, toolmakers etc).

 

7) Excellent appreciation of form and the interaction of positive and negative space.

 

8) Portfolios should have clear progression of the idea from fluid sketch to detailed sketch to 3D model, GA's are not enough! At least one fully detailed and toleranced part drawing of an injection moulded product, good clear photos of a good model... no poorly scanned sketches!

 

9) A solid understanding of the product development process and how ID fits with marketing (concept of designing for particular price points and niche markets) another bonus. A good understanding of industrial techniques such as extrusions, laser cutting, fasteners, welding, sheet metal production, composites, blow moulding, injection moulding for electronic products (no Escher products or poorly thought out part lines!). Ability to understand and design basic membrane switches a bonus.

 

10) All consultancies operate on an hourly fee basis and their designers must document time spent on each project accurately. Time management skills are vital as are an indication of how long the 3D renderings, models and detailed drawings took to complete. Employers want to start making money with the graduate very soon!

 

 

Found in: http://www.core77.com/design.edu.old/skillz.html

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Guest Random Designer

Oh well, that's me out of a job, then!

 

( B) )

 

I agree with the bit about not needing polished renderings... They are nice and set you apart, but I haven't yet found any absolute necessity to have them.

 

I would say skills at model-making using random bits of plastic found lying about the workshop should be added. LOL

 

I think understanding of manufacturing and time management need to be taught more at university. Just my tuppence-worth. B)

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Guest Aphasia
I think understanding of manufacturing and time management need to be taught more at university. Just my tuppence-worth. B)

Yeah, your right, considering projects last months, and all you have to produce is a few design boards (well for me anyway)

 

then after a few weeks you can re-design the boards in about a day.

 

Hardly seems what real designers do, or is it??

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we've learned about dfm and dfa (design for manufacturing/assembly) techniques, but it's true, they don't often ask for those things at university assignments.

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Guest Random Designer
Yeah, your right, considering projects last months, and all you have to produce is a few design boards (well for me anyway)

 

then after a few weeks you can re-design the boards in about a day.

 

Hardly seems what real designers do, or is it??

I can understand about thinking 'outside the box', and not letting production methods inhibit a concept design too much. This is all well and good for 'blue sky' design, or whatever you wish to term it, but how many of us end up with a cushy job where that is all we do all day?

 

At the end of the day, it has to be made.

 

Or it gets sent to development designers like me, who spend weeks re-designing it for manufacture.

 

And then re-designing it again it for manufacture within the budget.

 

Then get a whole load of stick because it doesn't look as good as the concept.

 

(I'm not bitter, honest!) :D hehe

 

I spent almost the whole of the second half of my final year project on design for its manufacture and assembly. I had two log books, a thin portfolio, and three small A3 presentation boards. But I got 80% for it. Pretty renderings my arse. That's what Max is for.

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Guest macKeith

for me, i think good sketching is important but good hand rendering is nice but not compulsory. theres reason why i say this.

in the past where doing stuffs in 3d softwares requires high investment in softwares, hardwares and time and results are usually not very impressive. so hand rendering is deemed as an essential skill for any designer.

but nowadays, with the advancement in technology, softwares and hardwares are now so effecient and cheap and results much more impressive and close to a actual final product. This allows people to make a much more accurate judgement on the proposed design. besides, with probably similar amount of time spent on modelling the product vs rendering it by hand, you get to view the product in any direction, views, colors setting with the click of just a few buttons.

in school, i hear lecturers stressing the importance of hand renderings and during interviews peoples saying your hand rendering is ok not very impressive and stuffs.... how impressed they are with star wars team drawings..... but to me, reason star wars drawings are impressive is amount of details the artist/designers put into (though i agree that their perspective is fantastic and flawless) which isnt quite applicable to product design. if people are saying that 3d softwares renderings of product is boring, why has walt disney dropped their business on their traditional 2d movies? why have films company switching to 3d animation and slowing phasing out 2d animation?

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Guest Dot Kite

Hello to everyone,

Talking about Top Skills of an emerging designer, i think that it is very important to have a good understanding of how Business works and how Industry works! Unfortunately, those things you can't learn them at school or in the university! But what someone can do, is that before gets the deegree has already several work experiences, through Interships, freelancing or even by having a real job, so, once is out from school has already the knowledge of how business moves ! Of course, what all of you said above is really important and nowdays perhaps a MUST !

 

But i think what makes the difference is the approach that everyone of us has for doing business and having excellent communication skills !

 

Having a good understanding for business it will also be very useful as self development if someone wants to build up his one Network of clients !

 

I woul like to know, how you guys think about this subject Design and Business....

 

 

My best wishes to everyone

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Guest macKeith

i agree with dot kite. design is business. design is basically a tool used to sell a product or increase sales/profits, much like marketing people.

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Guest Random Designer

Sad but true.

 

After I had been on placement I saw which bits of design are important and which are not with respect to selling products. That is why sandwhich courses are so important. There are some things that can't be taught in a classroom.

 

However, IMHO, getting work before getting at least a little bit of relevant education to prove aptitude would not work.

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