Jump to content
Product Design Forums

Treasurebox

Recommended Posts

Hey everyone,

 

My first thread!

 

I went to the first 3DPrintshow in London this weekend and was wowed by the array of machines and services on offer. The only thing missing was that there weren't many users of 3D printing there to ask questions about how easy it is to incorporate 3D printing into day to day design.

 

I'm potential looking to invest in a desktop 3D printer but I wanted to find out what designers though about them first.

 

Does anyone have an advice on how a desktop printer would compare to a online service?

 

Also, have people had experiences with .stl files not printing and what did they do to rectify it?

 

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey.

 

Yes 3D printing is amazing. Getting your design printed in physical form and getting it in you hand can progress a design so much. Its an invaluable tool.

As far as buying your own versus on-line service. If you do the sums and justify its cost then its totally worth it. Especially for flexibility. t

However, on-line services are likely to have more advanced machines than the one you are looking to buy? So if its accuracy and good tolerances your looking for then perhaps the on-line service is best.

 

Most CAD software has a part checker to check for dodgy surfaces or intersecting faces and shells/holes.

If not these guys are pretty good. http://software.materialise.com/magics-0

 

Your printer should come with software to set up the build, it might come with a file checker.

Its always good to ensure the build doesn't fail. Waste of material and time.

 

Let me know which one your thinking of buying.

 

Cheers

 

W

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in the market for one too. For around £5,000. Difficult of obtaining something descent with a large build surface and good resolution.

Leapfrogs Xeed, seems to be the one I'm looking at. Saw the beast at TCT live show in NEC(Birmingham) a few weeks ago. I managed to have a quick look at it. From some research, I've come to the conclusion its the best all rounder for the price.

80 microns per layer, abs/pla/pva., large build area.Two extrusion heads, however hasn't got the option for two colors to print right now, however leapfrog is releasing an update, so it will be able to print in two colors soon.

Any ideas/suggestions.

 

The main parts that will be built will be customer prototypes and a low cost 3d printing service for students and engineers/designers etc...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey everyone,

 

My first thread!

 

I went to the first 3DPrintshow in London this weekend and was wowed by the array of machines and services on offer. The only thing missing was that there weren't many users of 3D printing there to ask questions about how easy it is to incorporate 3D printing into day to day design.

 

I'm potential looking to invest in a desktop 3D printer but I wanted to find out what designers though about them first.

 

Does anyone have an advice on how a desktop printer would compare to a online service?

 

Also, have people had experiences with .stl files not printing and what did they do to rectify it?

 

Thanks

 

I have seen them in use just awesome watching your design project come to life it was about 18 months back and the price tag was eye watering for me any way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey everyone,

 

My first thread!

 

I went to the first 3DPrintshow in London this weekend and was wowed by the array of machines and services on offer. The only thing missing was that there weren't many users of 3D printing there to ask questions about how easy it is to incorporate 3D printing into day to day design.

 

I'm potential looking to invest in a desktop 3D printer but I wanted to find out what designers though about them first.

 

Does anyone have an advice on how a desktop printer would compare to a online service?

 

Also, have people had experiences with .stl files not printing and what did they do to rectify it?

 

Thanks

 

Hi there,

I work for EnvisionTec (http://www.envisiontec.com/), we produce models for prospective customers, I support the files in Magics and set them to print on our machines. Any questions I am happy to answer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey. Yes 3D printing is amazing. Getting your design printed in physical form and getting it in you hand can progress a design so much. Its an invaluable tool. As far as buying your own versus on-line service. If you do the sums and justify its cost then its totally worth it. Especially for flexibility. tHowever, on-line services are likely to have more advanced machines than the one you are looking to buy? So if its accuracy and good tolerances your looking for then perhaps the on-line service is best. Most CAD software has a part checker to check for dodgy surfaces or intersecting faces and shells/holes. If not these guys are pretty good. http://software.materialise.com/magics-0Your printer should come with software to set up the build, it might come with a file checker. Its always good to ensure the build doesn't fail. Waste of material and time. Let me know which one your thinking of buying.CheersW

Good advice here. The problem I see is that if you buy into one (and likely very basic) machine/technology/material, you will more likely limit your creativity to somewhere near tje machines capabilities. If instead of buying a cheaper machine, you can put your money towards a huge variety of advanced parts and variety of technologies that could provide more. I might think you'd be more successful this way.

From what I've heard (hearsay only), some of these cheaper machines don't come with build support software. You have to either change your design for the machine's capabilities or accept the short comings, failure areas, and whatnot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could also build one.

 

Here is a link to a website with the cheapest hardware all in one deal i know:

http://gadgets3d.com/index.php?route=product/product&path=72&product_id=87
This is a starter set including 3 different endstops for Reprap, MakerBot or other printertypes.

 

Than you only need the parts and the powersupply. The printing dimensions of a standard one is usually 200x200x200 mm, but if you make a MegaMendel it could be 400x400x400 mm

I like building myself because you can make adjustment.

 

If you do buy one pre-build, I advice not to buy printers with no heated-bed. Also heated-bed which are the printingsurface are known to bend after a couple of times. The problem is fixed by putting a glass plate over it. (The Orca has this problem) So you figuere that i'm not a fan of Kapton Tape

Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

 

I work for a 3D printing file sharing platform (www.myminifactory.com), which is powered by a larger 3D printing company (iMakr), so if you guys have specific questions I can help. My knowledge is mostly in desktop 3D printing machiens using ABS or PLA plastic filaments, but it seems like a couple of you have been thinking about investing in this equiptment, so yes any questions let me know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our firm was created a few project for 3d printing, company that print our projects always lot of time check project, than they only start to print.

They used MakerBot Replicator+ Mini  its good to make small detail. And it cost not so much like an analogue

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.