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jinard

Kula (Sphere) Chair

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Have any other views? I'm a little confused.

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Please elaborate as to which aspect it is that you don't understand and I can potentially re-render to show it more clearly.

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You rendered a chair - but the inner seat portion of it is showing up basically as solid black.

 

Also, is this chair machined from a 6 ton block of aluminum and then polished by hand?

 

In design, you want to show things in context...the "automotive stuck in the middle of a desert" scene isn't a very good use of context for a chair.

 

Also you show the chair being some type of polished metal, but their is a razor sharp edge where the inner piece (material unknown) meets the outer sphere and that part would be the arm rest.

 

It comes off as just a couple quick booleans to a shape without any consideration for how it could be made or how it would actually work as a chair. These days it's very easy to do a shiny rendering like that in a few minutes - you need to put more thought into the design if you want to sell it.

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Thanks for the tips, although I was under the impression that this was the project in progress section of the forum.

I certainly agree that all the manufacturing aspects have not been though through, obviously. The I am still sorting out the details of how/what the actual seat will secure itself. I was hoping for some comments/suggestions, perhaps I should have been more clear on that point.

 

Not entirely sure why aluminum would be the first conclusion you reached, when you can achieve a gloss with almost any plastic.

 

In any case, I will be sure to take the criticism into consideration before posting projects in progress, as it appears readers are looking for closer to production ready, rather than conceptual designs.

 

Again I appreciate the comments.

 

J

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Well you rendered what looks like a solid metal object, doesn't read as plastic if that was your intent. You can make plastic glossy or vacuum metallized, but that would be an interesting process on plastic that large. Also doesn't look like a shape that would want to be made out of plastic - very large, lots of undercuts and pulls from different directions, etc. Materials inform design, and this seems that it was not looking at any particular way of being created which is what separates the artists from designers.

 

Concepts read how they are presented - so presenting with a very finished rendering style makes it look like "here it is, I'm done" and putting it out of context makes it even more dramatic.

 

If you were doing a sketch, would you glue your sketch on top of a full color ad? Generally not, because if you're purely trying to communicate the design of your object it would detract. The faux floor mirror and desert are doing that here.

 

If you are looking for improvements on the form and design consider presenting work either using a flat simple shader (basic ambient occlusion only is very useful here): YashicaE35.jpg

 

Not to jump at you for it, the design itself has plenty of directions it could evolve but it reads right now as a very quick concept that was polished too fast for "blings" sake and not designs sake.

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Excellent, that is fair enough.

I actually think you just gave me a few ideas on how to push this forward.

 

Thanks, I certainly appreciate the constructive advice.

 

Am also wondering if this could be rotomolded then have the blue parts cut out afterwards as they do with many roto products.post-50475-0-19920000-1310048483.jpg

 

From what I understand they can recycle the excess materials afterwards so its not a terrible loss.

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If you're rotomoulding it, you wouldn't need to do any post-forming process to remove that material, the blue part would simply be another mould (or two that joined at the middle, to accommodate for draft angles). The advantage of rotomoulding is that you can make your mould of many different parts. Downside is that it's less consistent than other plastic forming methods, and your cycle times are way, way slower. Also, you'll need to some generous fillets on the corners or else you'll likely end up with all kinds of webbing or voids, since the legs are fairly long relative to their cross-section. You could maintain the sharp angle by incoroporating that into the design of the tub part that inserts into the main body.

 

In general though, that doesn't doesn't seem to easily lend itself to most manufacturing processes that are either simple or cheap. But hey, thinking about this kind of stuff is at least half the fun of design (or maybe I'm just a huge dork).

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Not at all, I was up all night thinking about all the different processes possible. I even considered a giant blow molding machine as a possibility, though I haven't heard of such a thing ha.

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Rotomolding is possible, but as was mentioned you'd need fairly soft edges, a lot of draft, and your design still seems like it has several internal undercuts inside the sphere itself. Also, since plastic isn't terribly structural you'd need to think of where the strength is going to come from.

 

You could do a hand-laid fiberglass chair, but even that will still require some generous radiuses and a careful consideration for the strength of it.

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Can you use filled thermoplastics for rotomoulding? I know the Panton chair was prototyped in glass-reinforced polyester, but was subsequently manufacturing of injection-moulded ASA (like ABS).

 

Basically what it comes down to is, this chair will never be inexpensive. But you probably knew that already.

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Can you use filled thermoplastics for rotomoulding? I know the Panton chair was prototyped in glass-reinforced polyester, but was subsequently manufacturing of injection-moulded ASA (like ABS).

 

Basically what it comes down to is, this chair will never be inexpensive. But you probably knew that already.

 

 

Yes I had no intentions of making it mass produce-able. I did however spend the day coming up with a far simpler version. Take a look (the x10 should be x14).post-50475-0-03370300-1310093251.jpg

I think this would work far better in terms of production, has a similar feel-ish.

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Wow, I'm impressed by the quick turnaround, and also your willingness to address constructive criticism. The new design is definitely way easier to manufacture, and still has a sleek look.

 

However! I feel like you've gone too far in the opposite direction, and are missing out a few simple and inexpensive processes that could retain a lot of the flair of the original design. The colour/texture contrast was one of the most interesting parts of the original concept, and you could easily keep that by simply adding a layer of white material to the final outside ply of the laminate. And you could keep the black, contoured tub seat with an injection moulded part that would attach to those brackets instead of the new planar design that is less exciting.

 

You can also play with visual tricks on planar curves to make them look like compound curves. For instance, if the outer edge of the main plywood profile was cut with an arc instead of a straight line, it'll look quite interesting when it's bent into a semi-circle.

 

In any case, good progress!

 

How are you enjoying Humber, by the way? (I graduated from there 3 years ago)

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Wow, I'm impressed by the quick turnaround, and also your willingness to address constructive criticism. The new design is definitely way easier to manufacture, and still has a sleek look.

 

However! I feel like you've gone too far in the opposite direction, and are missing out a few simple and inexpensive processes that could retain a lot of the flair of the original design. The colour/texture contrast was one of the most interesting parts of the original concept, and you could easily keep that by simply adding a layer of white material to the final outside ply of the laminate. And you could keep the black, contoured tub seat with an injection moulded part that would attach to those brackets instead of the new planar design that is less exciting.

 

You can also play with visual tricks on planar curves to make them look like compound curves. For instance, if the outer edge of the main plywood profile was cut with an arc instead of a straight line, it'll look quite interesting when it's bent into a semi-circle.

 

In any case, good progress!

 

How are you enjoying Humber, by the way? (I graduated from there 3 years ago)

 

Hey thanks for the tips, they definitely would address the original design more. And I graduated 2010 I should probably update my profile. No complaints about the school though, it was a great time for sure.

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