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Banani

My Inventor Portfolio

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Here is some of my work with Inventor Professional 2012. I'm quite a newb at this, but it's not coming out too bad.

All of the work is my own design and ideas.

 

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This is a bicycle damper that I created and modelled.

 

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A collection: Table, lamp, chairs and a wooden box.

 

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An equipment for holding "things" at place.

 

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A futuristic chair.

 

Please comment :)

 

Btw. I have plenty more models. But couldnt fit them in at this post

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It looks like you are coming on well with Inventor, it is quite a good piece of CAD software and has definitely put me in a bit of a pickle for where to put my CAD resource in future years.

 

What I would say is that the rendering engine attached is not particularly good. As a student you should be able to get a free copy of 3DS Max. Autodesk products work almost seamlessly together so you can get some very good results easily from your inventor assemblies.

 

Do you have any examples showing some of the more complex procedures such as cable/piping and parts designed with plastic features?

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It looks like you are coming on well with Inventor, it is quite a good piece of CAD software and has definitely put me in a bit of a pickle for where to put my CAD resource in future years.

 

What I would say is that the rendering engine attached is not particularly good. As a student you should be able to get a free copy of 3DS Max. Autodesk products work almost seamlessly together so you can get some very good results easily from your inventor assemblies.

 

Do you have any examples showing some of the more complex procedures such as cable/piping and parts designed with plastic features?

 

I agree that the rendering engine is a bit dreadful, on your tip I'll try to get hold of the 3DS Max. Would be great to have some better rendering.

Is it the "3ds Max Design" or "3ds Max" I should go for?

 

I have not made any models with cables or piping yet, but I guess it'll be in my portfolio in not too long. I see you're working as a product designer, what do you commonly model?

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cool stuff.

About the chair, something tells me in this shape it might have trouble with stability. Look at the area for the person's bottom and at the leg base.

The base seams too small to me.

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cool stuff.

About the chair, something tells me in this shape it might have trouble with stability. Look at the area for the person's bottom and at the leg base.

The base seams too small to me.

 

Yeah, i might have to make a little wider room for the legs. We could think that the base was made of gold > heavy as hell :lol:

I'll fix it up a bit !

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It looks like you are coming on well with Inventor, it is quite a good piece of CAD software and has definitely put me in a bit of a pickle for where to put my CAD resource in future years.

 

What I would say is that the rendering engine attached is not particularly good. As a student you should be able to get a free copy of 3DS Max. Autodesk products work almost seamlessly together so you can get some very good results easily from your inventor assemblies.

 

Do you have any examples showing some of the more complex procedures such as cable/piping and parts designed with plastic features?

 

I agree that the rendering engine is a bit dreadful, on your tip I'll try to get hold of the 3DS Max. Would be great to have some better rendering.

Is it the "3ds Max Design" or "3ds Max" I should go for?

 

I have not made any models with cables or piping yet, but I guess it'll be in my portfolio in not too long. I see you're working as a product designer, what do you commonly model?

 

Either, they are both pretty much the same program, just some interface differences.

 

Working commercially modelling comes to three main types. First there is component modelling. This may be something I have created from scratch or an off the shelf component that the manufacturer has not released 3D models of. If it is the latter I try to give the work to some students that I am trying to train up - its not the most interesting way to gain experience but it gives money and the understanding of what is involved in product development. I also think it is important to learn how different items interact with each other in a working product.

 

Secondly I model concepts: generally from the component library that I have spent the last year building. Putting together the working parts of the products that my company works with I can see how best we can develop them to design out any issues in previous models or bring in new features. A lot of this also tends to be turning concept ideation sketchwork in to 3D models for secondary prototyping.

 

The final type of modelling I do is modelling for illustration. This takes various forms and could be "product shots" for press releases or brochures, CAD drawings for installation and manuals or CAD support for our various customers. Working in a small department gives quite a varied world when it comes to CAD.

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Hello, im a newbie and it is my first post.

 

I was wondering what makes the above chair a futuristic one? To me, it looks quite a basic uncomfortable chair which lacks minimum features a task chair can have. Or perhaps I am missing the point?

I am a new student of ID but am quite an experienced furniture salesman and I can tell you the above I cannot sell.

Check out Vitra, Knoll, Whilkhan, Ahrend, Humanscale, Herman Miller, Haworth and RH for examples of successful good chairs.

 

Best,

Nima

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Hello, im a newbie and it is my first post.

 

I was wondering what makes the above chair a futuristic one? To me, it looks quite a basic uncomfortable chair which lacks minimum features a task chair can have. Or perhaps I am missing the point?

I am a new student of ID but am quite an experienced furniture salesman and I can tell you the above I cannot sell.

Check out Vitra, Knoll, Whilkhan, Ahrend, Humanscale, Herman Miller, Haworth and RH for examples of successful good chairs.

 

Best,

Nima

 

Well, I do agree with you. I would never have bought the chair as it is now.. :lol:

 

Vitra, Arne Jacobsen, Hans J. Wegner and Bruno Mathsson would probably be my favourite designers on the chair market.

 

The "futuristic chair" I made was just my first draft, an idea to go out from.

 

 

 

-Mr B Andersen

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