Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Industrial Design -- Years Ago


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Constantin

Constantin

    Level 1

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 15 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Iasi, Romania
  • Interests:transport design, 2d/3d cg, illustration
  • Status:Amateur

Posted 02 March 2011 - 09:07 PM

http://www.snotr.com...e_future_-_1948

How was it?
What changed? What trends did you noticed on your own? How conservative/open minded were the design companies or designers
themselves?
Do you see design going on a good direction compared to a certain period of time from the past?
What would you improve/change in today's design if you were to apply lessons from the past?

People with many years of experience please join the conversation :D

#2 feelpack

feelpack

    Level 1

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 13 posts
  • Location:US
  • Status:Professional
  • At:Feel Pack

Posted 04 March 2011 - 07:17 PM

I have no practical experience in product design, but theoretically
I believe that in the near future cars will come out in two main types:
those which are designed for long distance travelling and those
which are suitable for travelling in town.

The ones for travelling within the town boundaries or other short journeys
will be very slow like the very first cars that were introduced in the
market, perhaps slower. The others will be much faster.

The video in the link youíve posted is interesting. It shows how in the
past they used to have a vision of the future that was somehow distorted
in accordance to the stereotypes of that period. As an example, I donít
see how a three wheel car can be seen as an evolution of a four wheel
one. I might be wrong though; there may be some good reasons that I
havenít thought about to utilise that feature in the automotive industry.
Iíd be happy to debate about it.

#3 Constantin

Constantin

    Level 1

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 15 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Iasi, Romania
  • Interests:transport design, 2d/3d cg, illustration
  • Status:Amateur

Posted 09 March 2011 - 01:11 PM

I have no practical experience in product design, but theoretically
I believe that in the near future cars will come out in two main types:
those which are designed for long distance travelling and those
which are suitable for travelling in town.

The ones for travelling within the town boundaries or other short journeys
will be very slow like the very first cars that were introduced in the
market, perhaps slower. The others will be much faster.

The video in the link youíve posted is interesting. It shows how in the
past they used to have a vision of the future that was somehow distorted
in accordance to the stereotypes of that period. As an example, I donít
see how a three wheel car can be seen as an evolution of a four wheel
one. I might be wrong though; there may be some good reasons that I
havenít thought about to utilise that feature in the automotive industry.
Iíd be happy to debate about it.



I see what you mean but I find it highly improbable for the design to go only in 2 directions.
About he vehicles in the city, people who will own small city cars will want these vehicles to be able to go fast as well. If not, industry would constrain them to buy 2 cars.. and it's not very practical (costs for customer, parking spaces, traffic growth).

About the 3-wheel car, you don't have to look at it as an positive/negative evolutionary step compared to the 4-wheel cars.
It;s just a different type let's say. Some people may find it unstable or so -- but this is because they apply 4-wheel car physics to a 3-wheel car.
I think if you make a proper design for a 3-wheel, it can be very stable as well and also very practible. This is how I look at it. Its all in the design, the sector it is targeted on.

#4 feelpack

feelpack

    Level 1

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 13 posts
  • Location:US
  • Status:Professional
  • At:Feel Pack

Posted 11 March 2011 - 07:57 PM

Interesting. While I donít really feel convinced abut the stability of three wheel
cars, Iíd like to know more about them. Do you own one? Which model / brand?
Post pictures if you have some. Iíd like to see them.

#5 mart2010uk

mart2010uk

    Level 1

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 45 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:England
  • Status:Student
  • At:Staffordshire Univeristy

Posted 23 March 2011 - 01:04 PM

I donít think itís possible to think what future design will be like, which I think is quite exciting. With changing trends being a factor and the influence technological advancements have on design, itís almost impossible to guess. Although if I had to guess, I would say the main constant will be Economy. On another note, how cool would it be to do some sketches/renderings of what you think future cars would look like, and have them shown to you in 10 years down the line :)

#6 feelpack

feelpack

    Level 1

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 13 posts
  • Location:US
  • Status:Professional
  • At:Feel Pack

Posted 24 March 2011 - 02:03 PM

Well, we (designers, theorists, artists, consumers and so on) are the ones who decide.

#7 Constantin

Constantin

    Level 1

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 15 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Iasi, Romania
  • Interests:transport design, 2d/3d cg, illustration
  • Status:Amateur

Posted 01 May 2011 - 12:48 PM

hey everyone, here is a very interesting talk held by Richard Parry-Jones. He has worked for Ford on several positions for his entire career.
I'm sure you'll find this very captivating:



There is an audio recording on ITunes as well, put the video is better.

#8 Carrie

Carrie

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Location:Dallas
  • Status:Student
  • At:The Art Institute of Dallas

Posted 22 June 2011 - 03:50 PM

I was in London about 20 years ago and my husband introduced me to Reliant Robin a 3 wheel car that was popular in UK. They didn't look to safe to me. A three-wheeler design I love is the Carver, sadly they are no longer made. http://www.webwombat.../the-carver.htm

Attached File  TheCarver.jpg   20.54KB   0 downloads
I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Sponsors: