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Guest mj1

Taking Alias Surface Data Into Solidworks For Manipulation...

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Guest mj1

Just wondered how I do this properly? I've tried saving as IGES the opening in SW, but how do I then turn this solidworks surface into a solid?

 

Some of my degree project will be modelled in alias to get some nice surfaces, but needs to be turned into a solid for rapid prototyping...

 

Any advice is appreciated!

 

Mike

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Guest bildder

Just wondered how I do this properly? I've tried saving as IGES the opening in SW, but how do I then turn this solidworks surface into a solid?

Some of my degree project will be modelled in alias to get some nice surfaces, but needs to be turned into a solid for rapid prototyping...

Any advice is appreciated!

Mike

 

Could you post some images or iges file?

 

For prototyping you probably should save your model as .*stl, but first must be removed all surface errors, gaps etc.

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If you want a solid in Solidworks, try the following:

 

1 - Under preferences construction options, set the "Solidworks" default.

 

2 - Make sure you have a solid in Alias by ensuring all your surfaces form a closed volume with positional continuity, and then stitch the surfaces. Your resultant shell should have no boundaries (yellow edges).

 

3 - Try exporting this shell as an IGES or STP into Solidworks, and evaluate the quality of the surface.

 

I have not done this workflow with SW myself so I can't comment on it's efficiency, but I export solids and surfaces to Pro E on a regular basis with no issues, it's just a matter of finding the correct workflow.

 

You can export an STL directly from Alias if you need to, but Solidworks will let you add all your fillets as well as shelling the object easily.

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I export solids and surfaces to Pro E on a regular basis with no issues, it's just a matter of finding the correct workflow.

 

What does Pro/E do with high degree surfaces?

 

I think Solidworks will degrade everything to degree 3, but I don't know if this changes the actual surface at all. Certainly room for concern, considering you think you're using Alias for top quality surfaces only to have them dumbed down when you get it to your engineering package.

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Guest mj1

I don't have any images yes as I have yet to do the work.

 

cyberdemon's work flow is pretty much want I want to do, can you briefly fill me in on how I make an open surface (eg a hollow pipe) in alias into a closed surface to open in SW? How do you create the positional continuity and stitch surfaces in Alias to create no boundaries? I've not done this before.

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Guest solidworm

Kevin, as far as i know ProE supports higher degree surfaces. it's reverse engineering module is actually capable of building b-spline and bezier surfaces upto degree 15.

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Pro E can handle higher degree surfaces. The only time I've seen it screw things up is when you try to have it rebuild certain geometry or fix geometry. Then it will usually insert a high span 3 degree surface.

 

Since I'm not designing cars, this doesn't really matter to me. Usually avoidable as well.

 

MJ:

 

There are a couple things to keep in mind if you're doing this for the first time.

 

1: Bad modelling practices are going to show through here. If you have any geometry that was built sloppily they are going to start giving you a lot of headaches.

 

2: To check continuity between surfaces (a critical tool, put it on your marking menu now) you go to Evaluate->Continuity->Surface Continuity. Under the option box you can check if a boundary between two surfaces is positional (G0), Tangent (G1) or Curvature (G2). If you haven't heard these before spend some time reading through the documentation as it's critical to understand the differences. Positional (G0) just means that all of your edges are lined up within tolerance. Within tolerance is key - every program and situation will have it's own tolerance. The tolerance on a car will be a lot more forgiving than the tolerance on a cell phone. So something that may be curvature continuous with one setting may not be with another. This is why you should set your construction options to "Solidworks" as the first step - this should keep you in spec with what SW expects. To check your whole model you essentially would pick all the surfaces that make up your solid, select surface continuity, and this should run through and check all your edges, highlighting the once that don't meet up and how big the gaps are. If no bad edges you'd be good, but otherwise you will need to investigate each one on a case by case basis and try to fix it. I know how much this sucks because I just spent 5 hours doing it (reverse engineering other peoples geometry from another software package is never fun!). Once you have this sorted out go to the next step.

 

3: Stitching an object tells Alias you want to take your selected surfaces and join them into a single object. This does not have to be solid, but if you want it to be solid in SW then trying to achieve it here is your best bet. If you had any bad edges it will be highlighted here. Ideally at the top of your screen after you stitch it should say "Created 1 Shell with 0 Boundaries" This means it's a sealed volume. You could export this shell right now as an STL if you want to, or export it to Solidworks from here. I'm not sure what format Solidworks will like best, but STP and IGES are good places to start.

 

The workflow can be a bit heavy frankly. If you only have a few surfaces you need to build in Alias it may be better to try this workflow on a very simple object with only a few simple surfaces to understand how to do it before moving on to more complex objects.

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Guest mj1

Cyberdemon, thanks very much for that answer. Just what I was after.

 

I'll have a pop at the workflow tonight, just make something like a cone from a few surfaces and see how I get on. The geometry I want to model in Alias isn't too complex but easier to model than in SW and I want to show this work flow in my portfolio.

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