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Guest catwoman

Which 3d Product Should I Chose...

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Guest catwoman

...for design and prototyping of eyewear.

 

I have looked at Autocad Inventor but it seems to miss some freehand curving tools. At least if you do not have Alias as well.

 

I have also looked at Rhino which is somewhat cheaper, but I am little unsure of how much else you need of plugins, etc. to make a 3D prototype.

 

Any input appreciated!

 

Catwoman

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Alias, Rhino or Solidworks would all be good tools. Alias and Rhino probably the easiest for the freeform shapes but Solidworks has some pretty useful surfacing tools as well.

 

All 3 are capable of exporting geometry ready for prototyping.

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Guest catwoman
Alias, Rhino or Solidworks would all be good tools. Alias and Rhino probably the easiest for the freeform shapes but Solidworks has some pretty useful surfacing tools as well.

 

All 3 are capable of exporting geometry ready for prototyping.

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Guest catwoman
Alias, Rhino or Solidworks would all be good tools. Alias and Rhino probably the easiest for the freeform shapes but Solidworks has some pretty useful surfacing tools as well.

 

All 3 are capable of exporting geometry ready for prototyping.

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Guest catwoman
Alias, Rhino or Solidworks would all be good tools. Alias and Rhino probably the easiest for the freeform shapes but Solidworks has some pretty useful surfacing tools as well.

 

All 3 are capable of exporting geometry ready for prototyping.

 

Hi Cyberdemon,

 

Thanks for your answer. I do not have Alias. I have only Inventor. And I think that is a problem, right?

 

But wouldn´t it be much cheaper to buy Rhino instead of the Alias plug-in?

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Alias, Rhino or Solidworks would all be good tools. Alias and Rhino probably the easiest for the freeform shapes but Solidworks has some pretty useful surfacing tools as well.

 

All 3 are capable of exporting geometry ready for prototyping.

 

Hi Cyberdemon,

 

Thanks for your answer. I do not have Alias. I have only Inventor. And I think that is a problem, right?

 

But wouldn´t it be much cheaper to buy Rhino instead of the Alias plug-in?

 

I was refering to Alias as in Alias Studio, not the Alias for inventor plugin.

 

Rhino is the cheapest solution of the three, so if price is your # 1 barrier then go for it.

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Guest Bowl of Soup

Only my 2 cents, I highly recommend playing around with each application if you can, and as many as you can.

 

I have never liked inventor because I feel that it is trying to catch up to other 3D CAD apps and is taking advantage of traditional 2D people's familiarity with AutoCad. But since Autodesk bought all those apps up, I was hoping to see more confluence there, but I still feel Inventor is sub-par across the board.

 

Having said that, there are a lot of price points and apps out there, some aimed at cinema, others at products/prototyping.

 

The key is the end format that you need. You can also take advantage of some import/export options.

 

I actually currently run at home a weird mix of the following: Blender, MOI, zbrush and freeCAD (total cost is 600 USD for zbrush and 200 USD for MOI, the others are free). My next buy would be Rhino.

 

Note: I do not use these at work, stricktly for my own freelance projects (because of the software price points). I have trained in everything (solidworks, NX, Pro-E, 3DS, Maya, etc, etc, etc). I can also write my own plugins for Blender and freeCAD if I need too, so that helps, but these may not be good for you because they are not well supported. My outputs are .std and .obj and renders only.

 

So, there is no easy answer, you need to try as many as you can and decide.

 

Adam.

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Guest amoncur

If you can afford SolidWorks, I'd consider it. For eyewear you probably wont' be doing any surfacing that's too terribly exotic, and SolidWorks will do you just fine. Plus, it's become such a widely used system that the support and tutorials for it are ubiquitous.

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