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Guest Sturmer

Multi Tool

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Guest Sturmer

As i was inactive for quite some time on, the forum ill just post few models made in Alibre design... All comments are appriciated!

 

 

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38206_417872512681_696227681_4538371_5327072_n.jpg

 

38206_417872507681_696227681_4538370_6400060_n.jpg

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Guest Sturmer
nice design. renderings are cool too. try to use my perspective to give a more realistic look.

 

M.

 

Well im trying to use as much as possible standard views but, in this instance i played with perspevtives and angles of view just for fun of it.

 

 

Here is one more mine design that im currently working on.

 

untitled37.jpg

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Guest Buff
You may want to try and simplify your design language. Although the tool does appear useful, I think it can be more emotional aesthetically. Columbia River did a nice job of that on this multi-tool. http://www.campist.com/archives/columbia-r...-multitool.html

 

 

WOW, that's a truly awfull design. which is what I love about design. One mans passion is Picasso is another mans Picasso is pants

 

 

 

Sturmer. Just something for you to consider. Looking at your mill model, the bed of that machine would sag as it reaches the extent of it travell in either of its dimensions. This would result in parts that would not be as flat as they could be. A better design solution would be to have the base of the machine the length of the bed pluss the length of the travel to give support all allong the entire length of the bed.

 

The point I'm making here isn't so much about the design of the machine as there are many other things that need to be addressed, but more to do with workflow and design decision making.

 

Sketching is quicker than medeling, even poor sketching and it helps you visualize problems and conciev solutions. that way by the time the design gets to CAD you only need fill in the details. Your designs shouldthen end up being a better solution for the time invested. this is importnat to a commercial design house... maybe not so much in education

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Guest Strander
WOW, that's a truly awfull design. which is what I love about design. One mans passion is Picasso is another mans Picasso is pants

 

Okay you got me, yes it is cheesy and overdone. What I saw as successful was the consistent curve language in profile or at least a good attempt to communicate emotion by repeating a simple curve. Here is better example of a product that illustrates consistent rim/silhouette lines. http://www.productdose.com/article.php?article_id=749. Starks objects here are very soft aesthetically. With tools you may try and communicate a harder look. Harder and straiter lines tend to do that, just make sure you are consistent. I think your mill model is starting to work in that regard.

 

I agree that getting the most out of your time in terms of successful form/function combination is done by sketching. Fast physical sketches are also worth there time in gold. It is fun to see your ideas get to the level of nice renderings. Your skill level there seems sufficient.

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Guest Sturmer

As im total noob from the designers aspect, and im more of an usability freak then esthetics's but i really like organic look and combination something like cyborg(bio-tehincal). This Columbia thingy looks over designed to me....i like curves but this...is ..tooo much.. Il do some more , on designing aspect. And i must note , that this is not whole my desing but , copy of real tool that i use for referencing my design... :D ill try to make post some big changes i made to the tool handles (organic part :) - as much as alibre give me.. as is not strong in organic and spline like modeling)

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