Jump to content
Product Design Forums

Treasurebox
Sign in to follow this  
Guest E.J.Su

3d Softwares Accuracy?

Recommended Posts

Guest E.J.Su

New member here.

 

I am a more traditional industrial designer, meaning more sketching, drafting rather 3D modeling. Although I know well enough to get around in 3D softwares, I am not efficient enough to build a complex surface model on my own. I'd like to learn that aspect eventually though.

 

The company I work for, uses manufacturers mainly work with Solidworks, but I am a bit more familiar with Rhino3D and other animation-centric packages like 3D Studio Max. My questions, how accurate when you transferring Rhino3D model to a Solidworks? Would it make sense to design/model in Rhino and importing the model in Solidworks?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
New member here.

 

I am a more traditional industrial designer, meaning more sketching, drafting rather 3D modeling. Although I know well enough to get around in 3D softwares, I am not efficient enough to build a complex surface model on my own. I'd like to learn that aspect eventually though.

 

The company I work for, uses manufacturers mainly work with Solidworks, but I am a bit more familiar with Rhino3D and other animation-centric packages like 3D Studio Max. My questions, how accurate when you transferring Rhino3D model to a Solidworks? Would it make sense to design/model in Rhino and importing the model in Solidworks?

 

All 3D software has a set of tolerances and units that can be set up. These tolerances define how tight or loose the 3D data will be.

 

For example we work exclusively building surfaces in Alias Autostudio and then import those surfaces into Pro Engineer to solidify them and build engineering parts. The tolerances are dictated by the size of the products we use (a handheld product has different tolerance requirements then a car for example) but everything works well.

 

Rhino->Solidworks is possible, but it really depends on the workflow and the quality of the geometry you build. Sometimes surfaces that look good for a rendering won't be acceptable for production.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest simpo

Hi,

 

I use Rhino quite regularly now. Have also used Pro-e and alias before. Rhino can handle files accurately, but, as in Alias, the way to model is important.

 

Here is a set of guide that I adhere to when modelling in Rhino or Alias, that will need the file to be downstreamed eventually.

 

>>> CAID guideline

 

The linked article above never cover surface continuity... which in itself can be a tricky business requiring 'hands-on' experience and no hard and fast rule to follow.

 

For surface continuity SOPs, i follow this set of guideline 'generally' >>> .... rhino 3D surface continuity article

 

The guides are definitely not definitive but have worked for me most of the time. Hope this helps.. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Simpo:

 

Those guidelines are definately a good start - they echo very closely our workflow here. Especially the part about letting the MCAD software doing what it does best (shelling, fillets, etc)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest simpo
Simpo:

 

Those guidelines are definately a good start - they echo very closely our workflow here. Especially the part about letting the MCAD software doing what it does best (shelling, fillets, etc)

 

Thanks. Actually, I learn alot about these from the mechanical guys in the past places that i have worked with.

 

BTW, I see you around in other forums as well. You are a power Alias user.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.