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Guest Dsign Ranger

Random Auto Sketches

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Guest Dsign Ranger
Mister Dsign Ranger, don`t take it too offensive. I like that you are trying your best, and that you are posting things. But Cyberdemon is actually right. it rather looks like a high school drawing of a person who hasn`t practiced enough, and who doesn`t have neither line confidence nor perspective nor design nailed.

 

Well, mister "advancedboy", it is not a matter of taking offense. I call the post as I see it. It made no sense, and henceforth, I called it out as it is. Now to your complaints: How do you figure you know what elucidates "perspective" or "nailing a design", when you are even struggling with getting the design of the most basic shell of a motor vehicle right in the first place? You disagree, check out the thread you started: Gmc Grand Sasquatch

 

Your "car" drawings look like cardboard boxes on crudely drawn eclipses, which I presume you imagine to be "wheels". Just atrociously hideous, but I was kind enough then to constructively critique you on the drawings. Check it out. Your drawings, save for the fact that you use the computer to make the most remote sense of out them [otherwise folks would have to guess what it is you are even attempting to draw], is reminiscent of the sort one gets from kindergarten kids, who are just starting to get a grip on their sketching skills.

 

Here's a deal; define "high school drawing", because I don't have the slightest idea what it is supposed to be. I imagine that like everyone else, "high school" is made up of students of different backgrounds and skills and hence, there is no standard or uniform skills across the board. My guess is that there is no such thing except in the figment of your imagination, no? I'm beginning to notice a few characters here who just randomly come up with the first thing that pops up in their "heads", even if it doesn't make any sense, let alone they know what words they are using in the first place. My suggestion would be to make sure one has a dictionary standing by, to avoid the risk of sounding like they are unintelligibly rambling on, without having the slightest idea of what they are saying. Am I wrong? Well then, let's see your definition.

 

E.g. Do the drawings of the above-posted Mercedes concepts constitute "high school drawing" or something else? Please explain, mister "advancedboy".

 

Let`s start with perspective.

 

What about the perspective on the drawings already provided? Point them out. How do they compare with examples from Mercedes Benz, for instance?

 

When drawing wheels try to study how the wheel diameter and slope changes once going in perspective.

 

I don't have the foggiest idea how this applies to anything I've presented; clarification with visuals [i.e. the drawings in question], perhaps?

 

Wheelellipses don`t simply become smaller and narrower, they change direction as well. If you nail wheels, then you can nail wheel arches as they usually repeat the curvature.

 

Again. Provide the visual specifics in question. Grasping at nothing specific is meaningless. It is called a red herring, when you complain and don't provide specifics on the item(s) in question.

 

As to car design itself, 2 very important things in car is the roof curvature, and hip line. ( the crease at the edge of fenders that goes into the body under the windows. That line is crazy important, because it is very intense and it always struggles with other lines, . it either tries to find symmetry, paralelness , or disappears smoothly. Also, have a look at your c-pillars, most of them look skinny, narrow, that was done many decades ago. Nowadays c-pillars tend to be hefty, massive.look at the roof curvature, check where do you have the highest point of the roof, and where it should actually be.Check your design elements, try to be more innovative, and leave square,.. sharp edged elements as few as possible .

 

You say my car models have "skinny, narrow" c-pillars. How does that compare with that of the Merc drawings I showed above? Does that mean that the professional at Merc, for example, is out of touch with what constitutes a contemporary design? Clarify. Please reply with the requested SPECIFICS. If you feel that you cannot meet these minimum requirements of intelligent discussion, my recommendation to you would be to simply refrain from further commentary...but hey, it's your choice how the discussion flows from hereon.

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here I added some things to your drawing. You remind me of Jarrah White on the Youtube, he is having a channel about moon landing hoax. The difference is , he constantly spews out intelligence, and he is enjoyable, and it even doesn`t matter if you agree with him or not. he is fervent through research, hehe. As to mercedes, The curvature of roof is depicted in a way, that we can`t guess how thick the c -pillar is, and ,besides, i didn`t post those sketches, and I don`t like the black and white one on top , it is too swooshy, mooshy, indecisive. as to your comments about my cars, I digress.

post-28725-1282895981.jpg

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Guest Dsign Ranger
12.jpg

 

BTW, this sketch itself has several questionable design integrity issues, besides the obviousness that most motor vehicle designs that I've had the opportunity to examine don't adhere to this type of rendering. I've laid them down visually as follows...

 

motorcyclesketcherrors.jpg

 

...moreover a rendition of a motor cycle is not interchangeable with that of a car. One would have thought that that was a given.

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Guest Dsign Ranger
here I added some things to your drawing. You remind me of Jarrah White on the Youtube, he is having a channel about moon landing hoax. The difference is , he constantly spews out intelligence, and he is enjoyable, and it even doesn`t matter if you agree with him or not. he is fervent through research, hehe. As to mercedes, The curvature of roof is depicted in a way, that we can`t guess how thick the c -pillar is, and ,besides, i didn`t post those sketches, and I don`t like the black and white one on top , it is too swooshy, mooshy, indecisive. as to your comments about my cars, I digress.

 

 

Your scribble on a drawing of mine, which was not even presented in its original resolution, is funny. The front pillar that is nearest to the viewer generally doesn't show the actual angular nature of the pillar; the one furthest away from the viewer usually does a better job of indicating that. This phenomenon is just made a little bit more dramatic on the singular image you cherry picked, to highlight the sporty nature of the design. Similar thing with the bumper/front fender; you didn't pay close attention to the manifestation or shape of the side nearest to the potential viewer. The shape you scribbled on the image, as a "correction", does not reflect symmetry with the side closest to the viewer. All you've done, is to simply skew the drawing for the worse imo. As for the wheels, it shows just how much attention you are actually paying to the stance of the vehicle. To visually demonstrate this, I took liberty to take a vehicle in almost a similar [though not quite] stance...

 

TOP_SECRET_Lexus_LF_A_Supercar_by_jonsibal.jpg

 

Now use your marker on the wheels and wheel arches on this image, and see if you'll get something drastically different from that which you did with my drawing.

 

As for the drivel about whom I supposedly remind you of, even though you hardly know me...well, you are allowed to let your imagination fly as far away as possible. It has no bearing on reality or the topic under discussion. So you've already digressed, presumably something that you claim to be refraining from; try not to do that. :)

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Guest James.iD

God, everyone's as bad as each other, preaching meaningless design jargon as if it's gospel.

 

To me, the point of a sketch is to visualise an idea to others in the simplest way possible, they're not supposed to be perfect representations of the finished article. A sketch is a sketch, it doesn't matter if its not technically perfect as long as it does its job, which is to convince, instruct or whatever.

 

I recommend watching Marc Newson: Urban Spaceman

 

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Guest Taro

design ranger, maybe this is not what you want to do.

 

I believe even when you can draw those mercedez like a pro, you will still get bad comments about your stuff.

And there is a reason highschool stuff are called highschool stuff, and pro stuff are called pro stuff. Same goes with the old fashion and new fashion. There isn't right or wrong, as long as you drew it well.

 

If your drawings look like highschool drawings, all it means is that you need to go to a college majoring ID. That is how most of us improved from highschool to college to later... professional maybe?

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Guest Dsign Ranger

Trying to turn what started out as playful doodling below...

 

doodle4.jpg

 

...into a more "photoshop-ready/pleasant" rendering, below, hoping the shadings will act as guides...

 

doodle4render2.jpg

 

Apparently I haven't tried photoshop rendering before; too much going on, too little,...?

 

Any chiming in would be desirable, as long as it is done constructively; no need for nonsensical ad hominem "critiquing" like say, "it looks like high-school drawing", "old fashioned", et al. To anyone who is capable of adhering to this minimum expectation for a response, you are the sort of person I'm tacitly appealing to. And to those who simply cannot uphold such minimum expectation, I highly recommend that you be courteous enough to not bother replying -- I'd rather have no reply than that. Thanks in advance.

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Guest Kaiyuan

It seems like you're pretty good at defending your work. Some minor advice before I critique: not all comments will appeal to you, but take them as they come. Especially if you're looking to make this a profession, you're going to be faced with millions of comments you won't like (trust me, I know how it feels like). So my two cents would be to take everything into consideration, it only makes you better (even when you don't think it will). ANYWAYS:

 

Your perspective has improved since your first post.

Regarding the 'playful doodle': Rear of the car seems to be 'bending(?)' down (the wheelbase isn't straight, if you look at it, it seems like the car begins to droop down near the back).

 

Regarding the photoshop-ready one: Side mirrors seem a tiny bit off perspective (it may be just my eyes, but I haven't taken the time to measure it out). Personally, I think there's too much going on in this sketch to go into photoshop rendering (I mean, it's pretty much rendered already in pencil). I wouldn't shade in the things before putting it in photoshop, but I would just take note of the areas for reflections/shading (maybe put some reflection lines, but not shade it in). I'm saying this because usually if you put the sketch as an overlay over the color you want the car to be, the pencil shading can dull out the color in some areas. It's always good to have indications on what you want to shade/etc, but I'd personally just save the actual shading for photoshop.

 

Also watch the symmetry on your cars. I noticed on some of your drawings that the front of the car's elements aren't all symmetrical. Like on your photoshop-ready sketch, the three inlets/vents near the lip of the front bumper aren't lined up with overall central line of the car (if you look closely, the center vent doesn't really make sense. The car is at an angle, therefore you should see less of the left side of the front of the car, but the center vent, as well as the far left vent, have shifted towards the right making it seem a little off)

 

I hope this is constructive enough for you. Sorry I couldn't make any overlay drawings on your sketches to show what I mean by all that text^ (I don't have my wacom with me so it would be kinda hard).

 

PS: wow that's a long post haha sorry for the wordiness.

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First of all I would strongly recommend that you lose the attitude ... it really isn't going to get you anywhere. Most of the users on this board are only trying to help each other to improve their skills. Whether the comments are positive or negative they are intended to push you to further your skills, if you can't deal with that fact then industrial design really isn't for you.

 

I actually agree with a lot with what cyberdemon had to say. If you google industrial design sketches you will notice that none of the sketches look like the ones you have posted. The reason you do not see sketches like the ones you have posted is mainly due to efficiency, in ID school they teach you to communicate a design as quickly and efficiently as possible, hence the emphasis on line weight and minimal shading in sketches. Additionally we are taught to create lines in a single stroke as opposed to going over the same line many times to get it right.(often referred to as chicken scratch) This is the primary reason ID sketches have a particular look to them.

 

In regards to them being refereed to as highschool sketches, its not that they are trying to put you down or suggest you lack skill, its because the style in which they are drawn is what is taught in an art class, typically highschool for most of us. This is exactly the kind of comments we all received when we entered ID school. What you need to take away from this is that ID sketches have a particular style to them which we are all taught, and now we are only trying to pass this knowledge on to you.

 

So keep up the good work and hopefully you can put your ego aside so that you can gain some valuable knowledge from some of the more experienced users on the site.

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