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Guest Dsign Ranger

Random Auto Sketches

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Guest Dsign Ranger

Greetings. I want to start off with 4 simple sketches, which can be used to critique the fundamental aspects of the design. By "fundamental", I'm referring to matters like perspective and proportions. I realize there is a tendency for people to focus too much on aesthetics than the feasibility of the blue print design as a production vehicle. If personal preference for aesthetics can somehow be pushed aside and critique aspects of the body shell design [i know it is difficult to do, if not somewhat contradictory], as to whether the elements are feasible where turning the design into a live production example is concerned, then that would be great. Anyways, here are the sketches that I'd like said feedback on for starters...

 

saloon4front.jpg

 

saloon4rear.jpg

 

saloon5.jpg

 

saloon6frontorgnl.jpg

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Guest InitialKev

I like the value work going on but the perspective and proportions could be better. The tops of the cars look a bit too long. I'm a car enthusiast too and I like to draw cars too but I haven't really tried drawing anything but full profile views. It's easy to see that something is wrong but hard to do it right. Lol.

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Guest Dsign Ranger

Thanks for your input. There is always room for improvement. Speaking of perspective, some more stuff...

 

saloon6side.jpg

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Thanks for your input. There is always room for improvement. Speaking of perspective, some more stuff...

 

saloon6side.jpg

 

You seem to be spending a lot of time heavily working the pencil shading, I would consider spending some time looking at some of the car design portfolios on sites like cardesignnews.com.

 

You can draw cars 1:1 as realistic proportioned and accurately depicted, but in the auto industry thats still a foreign concept. Cars are so heavily influenced by emotion it's one of the only industrys left where the "hot sketch" is key. No one goes to production from sketches in the auto industry, sketches become 3D, 3D becomes clay, clay becomes 3D again and that becomes production.

 

You do have some interesting design elements, I would just spend less time working on shading with the pencil and more time crafting the shape and then try to do your shading in a more traditional or modern way (airbrush/pastel/colored pencil or digitally in sketchbook or photoshop)

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Rule #1 of design school - no using a ruler.

 

If you are a designer and you can't draw a good straight line freehand you need to reconsider professions.

 

There's a reason we are designers and not technical draftsman.

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Hi all

 

Like you sketches Dsign Ranger. Cyberdemon can you verify the rest of the design rules for us please, thats actually one of the thing I as a student failed to cover in Design College. (Yes I know how did that happen? strange) The only time I ever heard a lecturer talking about them is when I broke one of them. And also would you disagree with the Scott Robertson method of drawing in perspective?

 

 

Thanks

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Hi all

 

Like you sketches Dsign Ranger. Cyberdemon can you verify the rest of the design rules for us please, thats actually one of the thing I as a student failed to cover in Design College. (Yes I know how did that happen? strange) The only time I ever heard a lecturer talking about them is when I broke one of them. And also would you disagree with the Scott Robertson method of drawing in perspective?

 

 

Thanks

 

Haha I'll have to think of the rest. But they probably include: Don't drink anything on your desk, you will inevitably spill it on your computer at 3am before a project is due, or don't spend too much time hovering over your markers, you will get stoned and then your drawing will look much worse the next day once you come down.

 

I don't disagree with the Scott Robertson method at all. If you watch Scott draw, does he whip out a ruler for every straight line? No. Does he use sweeps or ellipse templates? Yes - and those are fine. He draws incredibly accurately freehand because hes got decades of practice. The first exercise most students should do in drawing courses is whipping out a sheet of 11x17 paper and forcing themselves to draw straight lines over, and over, and over and over. Then boxes, then ellipses, etc. Those fundamentals build muscle memory, and muscle memory is why the great sketchers can nail that consistently. And it's why when you only sketch on occasion you lose that muscle memory and have to start all over again.

 

Scott Robertsons technique is outstanding for teaching perspective because it makes you understand the fundamentals of strict construction which once you understand, allow you to correctly identify your perspective mistakes. Do you need to draw that strict all the time? Absolutely not.

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Guest Dsign Ranger

^ Interesting little concept going on there. Streamliner thanks for the commentary. I'm still experimenting with different sketching mediums at my immediate disposal at this time....

 

saloon7front.jpg

 

saloon7side.jpg

 

saloon7rear.jpg

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Guest Dsign Ranger

A few more sketches...

 

coupe1front.jpg

 

saloon8front.jpg

 

saloon8side.jpg

 

saloon8rear.jpg

 

...looking to do a few more with markers and chalk soon....and then ultimately photo-shop and/or other online tool.

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If I can make a suggestion, try doing a sketch entirely with ballpoint pen - no color.

 

Your overall designs and perspective are pretty good, but your line weight is really nonexistent because you're drawing it in much more of an old fashioned art class kind of way.

 

If you look at some really good car sketches take a look at how people use their lines. Lines will taper from bold to thin and different line weights will highlight a focal element of the drawing so your eye is drawn to one specific part of your drawing. It's an intentional method used to subconciously communicate design intent. By forcing yourself to use pen you eliminate color from the equation and focus 100% on line weight.

 

I would give that a shot for a while and post your progress before moving on to markers or any other media. I guarantee it will help.

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Guest Dsign Ranger

Cyberdemon, I had no idea that there was such a thing as "new fashion" and "old fashion" kind of sketching until you brought it to my attention. These images are in color, in lieu of photoshopping; heavy pen marks on them was thus intentionally done away with. Can you kindly demonstrate your idea on the following pieces, if you will...

 

Mercedes-Benz-CLS-Design-Sketch-4-lg.jpg

 

Mercedes-Benz-CLS-Digital-Rendering-lg.jpg

 

Mercedes-Benz-CLS-Design-Sketch-2-lg.jpg

 

_Mercedes-Benz-CLS-Design-Sketch-1.jpg

 

...is this the sort of sketching that is your cup of tea?

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Cyberdemon, I had no idea that there was such a thing as "new fashion" and "old fashion" kind of sketching until you brought it to my attention. These images are in color, in lieu of photoshopping; heavy pen marks on them was thus intentionally done away with. Can you kindly demonstrate your idea on the following pieces, if you will...

 

Mercedes-Benz-CLS-Design-Sketch-4-lg.jpg

 

Mercedes-Benz-CLS-Digital-Rendering-lg.jpg

 

Mercedes-Benz-CLS-Design-Sketch-2-lg.jpg

 

_Mercedes-Benz-CLS-Design-Sketch-1.jpg

 

...is this the sort of sketching that is your cup of tea?

 

By old fashioned I mean you're drawing a car in the same fashion that a high school art student would draw an apple. Your goal is to portray an image, and in this case it just happens to be a car.

 

Design sketching (which yes, it is a real thing - http://www.idsketching.com/) isn't just about portraying an image. It's about communicating design intent in a visual way.

 

The Mercedes sketches are all various degrees of what you typically see at the beginning phase of any car design project. The #1 reason you see so many sketches like that is because those are the "hot" sketches that make it out on to the internet. In the car design business hot sketches sell ideas. Does that mean it's my "cup of tea" - no not at all.

 

Heres a good example of a black and white sketch that for the most part demonstrates different line weights:

 

12.jpg

 

Theres plenty of things off about it, but it does a good job of communicating the form of the body and creating a focal point around the upper part of the bike with the line weights.

 

...but if you just want to be sarcastic about it, please continue. :ermm:

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Guest Dsign Ranger
By old fashioned I mean you're drawing a car in the same fashion that a high school art student would draw an apple.

 

You talk like you are in high school. There is no such thing as "new fashion" or "old fashion" type of sketching. It is a figment of your imagination. And in any case, the "clarification" you just gave me goes to show just how clueless you are about the words that you use.

 

Your goal is to portray an image, and in this case it just happens to be a car.

 

You bet, and it was done in color. This is why heavy pen-work was neither shown nor was needed. That you want one, is your subjective personal preference. It has nothing to do with being "new fashioned" or "old fashioned", which is something that you've made entirely up.

 

 

Design sketching (which yes, it is a real thing - http://www.idsketching.com/) isn't just about portraying an image. It's about communicating design intent in a visual way.

 

The Mercedes sketches are all various degrees of what you typically see at the beginning phase of any car design project. The #1 reason you see so many sketches like that is because those are the "hot" sketches that make it out on to the internet. In the car design business hot sketches sell ideas. Does that mean it's my "cup of tea" - no not at all.

 

The fact that I've been able to provide you the work of professionals in one of the world's well known brand and a leading car producer, which you admit is not your cup of tea either, goes to show that the world does not revolve around things that you make up or you personally prefer. Just because something is not done to your personal liking doesn't make it wrong or less skillful than what you supposedly claim to be that of your own.

 

 

Heres a good example of a black and white sketch that for the most part demonstrates different line weights:

 

12.jpg

 

Oranges and apples. My sketches were done in color. This is in black and white; are you not perceptive enough to notice that?

 

...but if you just want to be sarcastic about it, please continue. :ermm:

 

There is nothing to be sarcastic about. Point blank, your comment doesn't make any sense. It's that simple. E.g. the claim that some "high school" drawing is one and same meaning as "old fashion" does not make any sense at all, and you bet, there are likely high school students who are more capable than you are likely to be in your sketching skills. My advice: Drop the snobbish attitude, and pick up an intellectual one. If you wish to take this advice as "sarcasm", then so be it.

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Mister Dsign Ranger, don`t take it too offensive. I like that you are trying your best, and that you are posting things. But Cyberdemon is actually right. it rather looks like a high school drawing of a person who hasn`t practiced enough, and who doesn`t have neither line confidence nor perspective nor design nailed. Let`s start with perspective. When drawing wheels try to study how the wheel diameter and slope changes once going in perspective. Wheelellipses don`t simply become smaller and narrower, they change direction as well. If you nail wheels, then you can nail wheel arches as they usually repeat the curvature. As to car design itself, 2 very important things in car is the roof curvature, and hip line. ( the crease at the edge of fenders that goes into the body under the windows. That line is crazy important, because it is very intense and it always struggles with other lines, . it either tries to find symmetry, paralelness , or disappears smoothly. Also, have a look at your c-pillars, most of them look skinny, narrow, that was done many decades ago. Nowadays c-pillars tend to be hefty, massive.look at the roof curvature, check where do you have the highest point of the roof, and where it should actually be.Check your design elements, try to be more innovative, and leave square,.. sharp edged elements as few as possible .

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