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Guest hamidi

Tea Maker

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Guest hamidi

this is an invent of some one who ask me for develop the fonctions and body structure

i strated from sketchs to SOLIDWORKS 2010 THE RENDER WITH PHOTOVIEW 360

This work finished in 9 days

i'm student &st year master COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN MECHANIC

EXCUSE ME FOR MY BAD ENGLISH....

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Guest yutyjytj
this is an invent of some one who ask me for develop the fonctions and body structure

i strated from sketchs to SOLIDWORKS 2010 THE RENDER WITH PHOTOVIEW 360

This work finished in 9 days

i'm student &st year master COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN MECHANIC

EXCUSE ME FOR MY BAD ENGLISH....

 

 

this looks very interesting. good job

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Guest Buff

Perhaps there is deliberate missing out of detail to protect IP but if not I fail to see how/why this took 9 days to do?

 

How many hours a day did you put into it?

 

At a normal productivity of 6 hours for a normal 8 hour working day thats 54 hours. I would have to say thats too long for the level of detail I'm seeing.

 

The back cover looks like you intend it to be a pressing. Perhaps of stainless steel. That would be a challenge to manufacture like that.

 

The style isn't to my taste but non the less is nice and does have its place on the shelves I think.

 

Dont get me wrong, I'm not trying to insinuate that there isnt 9 days of work involved in designing and developing a tea maker. I'm just trying to figgure out if this equates to £5,000 worth of ID/concept design/CAD, in which case it's taken too long and then an area for you to ppractice and gain som speed in your workflow, or if its and unfinished £10,000 research, design, development, engineering through to manufacture project?

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Here are my 5 cents. But don`t take it too seriously as I am an amateur at very low level, so , whatever. Firstly, I personally find the colour , yak, I don`t know why but this kind of brown, hmm. Next, if you look at the colour of your metallic parts, they look aluminium, not steel. Is that what you wanted?Next, if you look at the dispenser, or whatever that part is called, that squarish rounded thing where you put your cup on probably, it looks alien, it doesn`t have a single adjoining line to the rest of product, which gives it an image of ` let`s stuck the thingies on later`.

If you look a the button area, it rather reminds me those uberexclusive small companies, that can`t buy industrial stamping machinery, so they either make everything by hand or simply outsource from cheap bidders. Then they overcharge by saying, it is an individual , handcrafted design.At first I thought there were3 sockets, and not buttons. it rather looks as a good toy from70ies from Soviet Union. They used to make car toys, kitchen toys etc like that. I agree with Buff bout the back lid, it might cause problems to stamp it in a single part, besides it looks good, if not better than the actual front . Also be more decisive about the edges of the metallic lid, make it either submersed in the panel, or attached to it with distinctive , rounded rims, skinny edges is no way to go. Anyway, good work, keep improving!

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Guest hamidi
Perhaps there is deliberate missing out of detail to protect IP but if not I fail to see how/why this took 9 days to do?

 

How many hours a day did you put into it?

 

At a normal productivity of 6 hours for a normal 8 hour working day thats 54 hours. I would have to say thats too long for the level of detail I'm seeing.

 

The back cover looks like you intend it to be a pressing. Perhaps of stainless steel. That would be a challenge to manufacture like that.

 

The style isn't to my taste but non the less is nice and does have its place on the shelves I think.

 

Dont get me wrong, I'm not trying to insinuate that there isnt 9 days of work involved in designing and developing a tea maker. I'm just trying to figgure out if this equates to £5,000 worth of ID/concept design/CAD, in which case it's taken too long and then an area for you to ppractice and gain som speed in your workflow, or if its and unfinished £10,000 research, design, development, engineering through to manufacture project?

thanks buff for your PROFESSIONAL comments so :

i work in this with average time 2 hours per day so total time is about 18 hours because i have other responsibilities in my personal life

i design the outer shell with its accessories and the Positioning of mechanical parts like water pumps, electric resistance, but the principle is already exsite and it's an IP of this inventor

for the money I have no idea for the progress of this with the work

because I'm just a student i'm not a professional like you buff

but for you I have my thesis at the end of my degree studies

it's a study a scara type robot 3RT

modeling with solidworks 2010

it's comming nearly to this forum room

thank you again buff

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Guest Buff

Thanks for the clarification. 18 hours seems a lot more reasonable and your explination of the extent of the works makes the presented more understandable.

 

Be aware of this if/when you're presenting to prospective employers as your speed/productivity will be of interest as much as your quality

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Nice job, I like to see how this stuff works. what I mean is, when you want to present your work, you have to explain in more details.

 

This is not an art work so you'd better to describe in low level. And it could be a good idea to include some sketches from scratch.

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Guest Strander

This is coming from a Design background and I know your background is CAD.

It looks like a SolidWorks model. I can almost make out the feature tree. Successful designs usually go beyond "canned" rounds. We use SolidWorks but almost always work with surfaces to keep the program from taking control of the design.

Another thing to consider is the way the stainless meets the brown. Right now those connections seem "tacked" on. If the brown planes maybe indented or something it might look a little intensional.

On a positive note, I like your attempt at simplicity and don't mind the retro color scheme.

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Guest Buff
This is coming from a Design background and I know your background is CAD.

It looks like a SolidWorks model. I can almost make out the feature tree. Successful designs usually go beyond "canned" rounds. We use SolidWorks but almost always work with surfaces to keep the program from taking control of the design.

Another thing to consider is the way the stainless meets the brown. Right now those connections seem "tacked" on. If the brown planes maybe indented or something it might look a little intensional.

On a positive note, I like your attempt at simplicity and don't mind the retro color scheme.

 

 

That's a good point actually. best practice for many years tended towards Wavefront (Alias) for the A surfaces and Pro/E for the B surfaces.

 

That said the rather cubist design language of the above project and relativley small size of the rounds in relation to the whole product, I think it's just about acceptable as a work method.

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Guest LitterPicker King!
This is coming from a Design background and I know your background is CAD.

It looks like a SolidWorks model. I can almost make out the feature tree. Successful designs usually go beyond "canned" rounds. We use SolidWorks but almost always work with surfaces to keep the program from taking control of the design.

Another thing to consider is the way the stainless meets the brown. Right now those connections seem "tacked" on. If the brown planes maybe indented or something it might look a little intensional.

On a positive note, I like your attempt at simplicity and don't mind the retro color scheme.

 

 

GREAT STUFF!!

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Guest hamidi

Thank you for your replies

but we all know the solidworks is a surface modeling 3d programme

for the stuff you talk i like rhinoceros with NURBS system.

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