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Guest marco.sala

Wood For Kitchen Tools

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Guest marco.sala

Hi all,

 

I'd like to manifacture some kitchen tools (spoons, chopping board...), although I have experience in working wood I am unsure what type of wood is best for this purposes. Any idea?

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Guest Ceri
Hi all,

 

I'd like to manifacture some kitchen tools (spoons, chopping board...), although I have experience in working wood I am unsure what type of wood is best for this purposes. Any idea?

 

 

You could try Teak if you want something exotic, or laminated bamboo if you want something a bit more contemporary. Basically you will be looking for a hard wood with a small tight grain which is dimensionally stable. Birch, if I remember correctly, is particularly odorless and fined grain but I don't think it has the best dimensional stability.

 

Hevea (rubber wood) is an oily wood that I particularly like as it is a by product of managed rubber estates so it is quite nice to use it rather than burn it.

 

Hope that helps

 

Ceri

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Guest Bowl of Soup

preference should be given to harder woods (maple, oak, bamboo, etc)

 

the finish (coatings, etc) must be acceptable for food use.

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Guest marco.sala
Hi all,

 

I'd like to manifacture some kitchen tools (spoons, chopping board...), although I have experience in working wood I am unsure what type of wood is best for this purposes. Any idea?

 

 

You could try Teak if you want something exotic, or laminated bamboo if you want something a bit more contemporary. Basically you will be looking for a hard wood with a small tight grain which is dimensionally stable. Birch, if I remember correctly, is particularly odorless and fined grain but I don't think it has the best dimensional stability.

 

Hevea (rubber wood) is an oily wood that I particularly like as it is a by product of managed rubber estates so it is quite nice to use it rather than burn it.

 

Hope that helps

 

Ceri

 

Is hevea expensive/difficult to get hold of?

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Guest nicanor

You may or may not know this but just mentioning to those that don't for their future reference. Some wood species are not food-safe (especially exotic woods), so best to research if you're not sure. And when finishing make sure you use a food-safe finish. I like using mineral oil; inexpensive and works and look great (cheaper to buy from pharmacy than a wood supplier).

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Guest marco.sala
You may or may not know this but just mentioning to those that don't for their future reference. Some wood species are not food-safe (especially exotic woods), so best to research if you're not sure. And when finishing make sure you use a food-safe finish. I like using mineral oil; inexpensive and works and look great (cheaper to buy from pharmacy than a wood supplier).

 

Thanks for the advice nicanor.

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