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Guest j2k413

Trying To Sketch A Car

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Guest j2k413

hi

 

i am an engineer trying to make some car sketches. need some constructive criticism so that i may work on it.

 

thnx

post-7815-1271747311.jpg

post-7815-1271747334.jpg

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For early sketches it's a good start.

 

With any design sketches, the keys to a great sketch are good perspective (does it look how an object should actually look, or at least does it appear to?), good line quality (do the lines communicate detail about the design like edges, part lines, or surface details?), and a center of visual interest (how do you focus the viewers eye to the most important part of your design).

 

When you're drawing it looks like you're using a conventional pencil, and the results are the smudgy gray lines you get because the lead is too soft. My personal suggestion is to stick with a simple ballpoint pen early on since you can't erase - this means you will make mistakes and learn to go over them by creating bolder lines which helps you develop line weight.

 

To better understand if your perspective is working right, try looking at your image in a mirror (or hold your paper up to a window and look at it from the opposite direction) when you flip the image over mistakes in perspective become much move obvious because your brain isn't used to seeing it that way.

 

Also to improve your line weight, practice making your lines using your full arm to draw, not just your wrist. Work on making single strokes instead of short, choppy movements. Keep your wrist still and use your elbow and shoulder to draw - also practice drawing BIG - like on 11x17" paper rather then small. Big drawings shrunk down always look better than small drawings blown up.

 

In your drawings above the perspective looks OK but the proportions on the bottom drawing look a bit off, car feels a bit too short/wide and stubby. And the pencil shading is unnecessary and smudgy. If you want to use pencil consider getting a pad of smooth paper and some Prismacolor Verithin pencils in a color like Indigo blue. You will see a lot of ID sketches in this medium because it lets you build up your image not in pure black, but a wider range of tones and the pigment isn't as soft as a regular pencil so it stays sharper and won't smudge.

 

Hope that gives you some feedback to start.

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Guest j2k413
For early sketches it's a good start.

 

With any design sketches, the keys to a great sketch are good perspective (does it look how an object should actually look, or at least does it appear to?), good line quality (do the lines communicate detail about the design like edges, part lines, or surface details?), and a center of visual interest (how do you focus the viewers eye to the most important part of your design).

 

When you're drawing it looks like you're using a conventional pencil, and the results are the smudgy gray lines you get because the lead is too soft. My personal suggestion is to stick with a simple ballpoint pen early on since you can't erase - this means you will make mistakes and learn to go over them by creating bolder lines which helps you develop line weight.

 

To better understand if your perspective is working right, try looking at your image in a mirror (or hold your paper up to a window and look at it from the opposite direction) when you flip the image over mistakes in perspective become much move obvious because your brain isn't used to seeing it that way.

 

Also to improve your line weight, practice making your lines using your full arm to draw, not just your wrist. Work on making single strokes instead of short, choppy movements. Keep your wrist still and use your elbow and shoulder to draw - also practice drawing BIG - like on 11x17" paper rather then small. Big drawings shrunk down always look better than small drawings blown up.

 

In your drawings above the perspective looks OK but the proportions on the bottom drawing look a bit off, car feels a bit too short/wide and stubby. And the pencil shading is unnecessary and smudgy. If you want to use pencil consider getting a pad of smooth paper and some Prismacolor Verithin pencils in a color like Indigo blue. You will see a lot of ID sketches in this medium because it lets you build up your image not in pure black, but a wider range of tones and the pigment isn't as soft as a regular pencil so it stays sharper and won't smudge.

 

Hope that gives you some feedback to start.

 

 

thank you. i have always drawn on the smaller A4 size papers and may be that is a reason why the flow of my hand is restricted. i will definitely try to shift to the A3 sizes and will post something new in a few days time.

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