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Guest fubila

..my latest car designs..

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Guest fubila

hi friends, this is my second rendering with photoshop.I wait your comments. thanks.

post-23-1116088574.jpg

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Guest Jakska

Nice renders. The car looks strange though, no? The windshield is far too narrow, same goes with the roof, it looks as though it has been trapped under a car crusher...

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Guest fubila

and the anotherone... this car designed by Fubila, colored by Oğuz Sipahioğlu...

(designed for Toyota Turkey Design Competition but we didnt sent it.) wait comments.

post-23-1115245994.jpg

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Guest Xander

I like the toyota verry much(!), the effects are also much better than the ones on te mercs.

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Guest jgabry

EEEK man...

 

are you not a fan of the drivers vision?

 

one should be able to see out of the windows, eh?

 

just my two cents, but you should MAYBE think about making the vehicle just a hair taller. otherwise there is a transportation design instructor out there ready to go nuts with a red pen all over that nice rendering of yours.

 

...

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Guest jgabry

shoot, i don't want to nit pick, however...

 

in car drawing, sketching, design, there is a term called "jounce". "jounce" is the space between the tire and the vehicle itself. in real life it exists (trust me tires do not rub againt quarter pannels) unfortunately in your (and most) car drawings, sketches, designs it does not. try adding it. beleive it or not it will make your renderings look BETTER, add some detail, or design to the tires too. a michelin man, text and some definition ...you might be amazed.

 

i am only telling you all of this because i (and most others) have made the same mistakes. the worst feelin in the world is spending a lot of time on a rendering that you think is bad ass, then havin an instructor mark it up in front of the class with a nasty red marker.

 

the thought gives me the heebeegeebees.

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Guest shing
in car drawing, sketching, design, there is a term called "jounce". "jounce" is the space between the tire and the vehicle itself. in real life it exists (trust me tires do not rub againt quarter pannels) unfortunately in your (and most) car drawings, sketches, designs it does not. try adding it. beleive it or not it will make your renderings look BETTER, add some detail, or design to the tires too. a michelin man, text and some definition ...you might be amazed.

hmm.... that's what im thinking when my 1st view on this car(although im just little student in secondary sch :D ).

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Guest sachin

http://www.deviantart.com/deviation/7058328/

 

I feel this tutorial will help out a lot. Hussein is very adept with path selection and pretty @#$@#$ good at the hot sketch.

 

The rendering still looks flat and I can't exactly tell what the surfaces are doing. But when you render a car keep two things in mind.

 

First, the principle of the box. When you render a box there are three surfaces so that means there are three values: bright, middle, and dark. The bright surface is on the top, and depending on where the light is going will determine where the other two values go. Most people usually opt for the face of the car to be darkest.

 

Second, the principle of the shiny sphere or cylinder. On a rounded surface, the shadow occurs from the peak of the surface and goes downward with reflected light bouncing from the ground. On the top, the atmosphere would reflect into the surface.

 

So before you render cars, understand how cylinders and boxes pick up shadow and light. At school we rendered a lot of spheres, cylinders, and boxes to understand how these principles work.

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