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Caterham 3-olé


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#1 Guest_SeaLion_*

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Posted 14 April 2010 - 11:04 PM

Designed for the Project Splitwheel. A low engine (boxer) behind the front axle and electric motors drives at the rear wheels. Child seat in the middle slightly behind the front seats with the child's legs between the front seats. Outside mirror on the driver's side and rear view camera on the other. All glasses are parts of vertical cones (single curved). By placing a camera where the driver's eyes would be and then render a scene, I could check what the driver would see, even in the rear view mirror.

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Modeled and rendered with Bryce 6.1 on a PowerBook G4.

#2 advancedboy

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Posted 15 April 2010 - 08:44 AM

How do you do the lighting and shadowing. Do you use your knowledge to apply each shade, or a programm does the shading and you simply apply the colour? And can you move the light source around the designed car when it is finished and then decide where to put it? thanks!

#3 Guest_SeaLion_*

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Posted 15 April 2010 - 06:28 PM

I have made a minor eviroment around the model, for reflections. I placed a transparent cloud over the car to give ekstra light to the upper side reflection. I can turn the "sun" light source as I like, and I can color the light and the shadows. I can also specify how reflective or transparent each material will be. The render program do the rest, all the lights and reflections are calculated to make the final scene rendering.

The only parts that I didn't model in Bryce was the driver (from Poser), the seats (imported dxf-model from the internet), the wheel tyres and rims (modelled with SolidWorks), the background trees, the registration numberplate and the dashboard instruments graphics (imported as flat pictures from Photoshop).

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#4 Cyberdemon

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Posted 15 April 2010 - 07:33 PM

The design seems a bit primitive and booleaned together - but knowing that you used Bryce I can kind of understand why, it's a pretty limiting package from a design perspective. All your edges are so sharp that it makes the design seem a bit unnatural. The front fenders also seem to struggle a bit to integrate with the body - almost looks like it wants to keep the front wheels to get rid of some of that mass.

For working within the confines of that package though, pretty good.

#5 Guest_SeaLion_*

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 05:21 AM

It sure is booleaned together. Actually that is what I like most with Bryce. The main form is made of sqeezed spheres. The forms and edges then becomes very tense and beautiful from any angle.

I haven't found any other 3D modeller that have the possibility to sqeeze speres the same way. Yet. When I do I will switch because Bryce is full of bugs.

#6 advancedboy

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 06:46 AM

I agree with you Cyberdemon, I was only afraid to say that, feared that folks might attack me ` you only criticize others, while,` ..... There are so many programs, that I even don`t know which one would be the most appropriate for designing cars beyond sketches. I am stuuned that the program would even allow to choose transparency level or reflectivity level, that implies that I can could even design plastic moldings and elements of cars, without worrying how to get the needed texture.

#7 Guest_Colvindesign_*

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 02:25 PM

SeaLion, I saw your work on Project Splitwheel.

I like your design, why not post some of the other work you've done on it previously?

#8 Cyberdemon

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 02:46 PM

It sure is booleaned together. Actually that is what I like most with Bryce. The main form is made of sqeezed spheres. The forms and edges then becomes very tense and beautiful from any angle.

I haven't found any other 3D modeller that have the possibility to sqeeze speres the same way. Yet. When I do I will switch because Bryce is full of bugs.


I would spend some time in a surfacer like Rhino or Alias...both will let you model with primatives but there are a much larger host of other tools to refine the design. It's more then just tension, it's the razor sharpness of your intersections. Theres some point where they seem interesting but the overall form feels a bit primative and unrefined.

I agree with you Cyberdemon, I was only afraid to say that, feared that folks might attack me ` you only criticize others, while,` ..... There are so many programs, that I even don`t know which one would be the most appropriate for designing cars beyond sketches. I am stuuned that the program would even allow to choose transparency level or reflectivity level, that implies that I can could even design plastic moldings and elements of cars, without worrying how to get the needed texture.


Why stunned? 3D design is how the industry works, sketches are just a tool to quickly ideate on those 3D designs. It's how cars are designed whether its the physical parts of a real car, a 3D rendering, a video game model, or a movie special effect, the process is all more or less the same. Almost every car in the world was originally designed in Autodesk Alias Auto Studio, and then those surfaces are imported into an engineering package like Pro Engineer, Unigraphics NX or Catia and converted from isolated surfaces in space to solid engineered parts which can be manufactured.

This is the the typical look of a production car before manufacturing, although typically you can achieve the same form with much simpler details.

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#9 Guest_SeaLion_*

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Posted 19 April 2010 - 06:39 PM

SeaLion, I saw your work on Project Splitwheel.

I like your design, why not post some of the other work you've done on it previously?

:specool: Hmm, I may do that.




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