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Guest spadez

Learning How To Draw

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Guest spadez

Hi,

 

Im on my placement year at the moment, heading back to my final year in September at Brunel. So far my drawing skills are terrible. I thought I would make an effort from this point to improve my sketching and marker skills before I get back to university. Its bad that I have just lived with it for this long, but im hoping now isnt too late.

 

Imagine you have a student, who doesn't really understand perspective drawings (I can do them, but they never look quite right, infact they look pretty awful). My whole sketching ability is poor. Ive been using my CAD skills to compensate up to this point.

 

What would be really useful to me is it you could tell me where I should start. What tools should I get myself set up with, what should I try to start drawing to begin with, and are there any sites which which will give me good beginner information?

 

Any help would be much appreciated.

 

James

 

P.s I know there is a thread very similar to this open at the moment, but I think my question is in a slightly different direction.

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You need to break it down into smaller sections.

 

- Start off by learning basic two point perspective, drawing fundamental shapes such as boxes, cylinders, spheres etc. I don't know of any books but there are plenty of online resources ie here, www.idsketching.com, or youtube (eg http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iZ8UBN12rDI...eature=related).

 

- You also need to practice your technique, ie how to draw a clean line (plenty of threads around here) and how to draw ellipses using major, minor axis.

 

- You then need to look into line weight and how it is used in product design sketching to emphasis certain edges.

 

- You need to look into how to simplify a shape down and remove unnecessary details whilst providing enough visual information of a product.

 

- Then you need to look into light and shading. Do this using the fundamental shapes in step one.

 

- If you are looking to render in marker then you need to learn marker technique. idsketching.com is a good place for this.

 

- Further on you can go into using colour correctly, product context, composition and drawing the viewer's eye.

 

- Look at artists' work that you like and take inspiration and influence from it.

 

This is a basis and I reckon you should focus on this with basic shapes as, once learnt, you take the same principles and easily apply them to more complex geometry.

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Guest p waddy

Hi Spadez, I'd recommend having a look through the topic I started in the 'sketches and renderings' section. I started it a while back being very poor at sketching.. Some of the replies by people are very helpful and would be of great use to you too.

 

If your looking for some how to improve stuff, that design sketching book might not be the best choice yet. Go on www.idsketching.com theres loads of useful videos on there and various tips.

 

Also, a book I bought that i found helpful is one called 'Rapid Viz' It's quite old but very helpful if you dont know a lot like myself.

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Guest 3dmodeller

This has been said many times before, the best way to improve is to practice and above or else observe. Before learning about perspective try to become confident with the pencil or pen. I remember an old art teacher of mine making us draw repeatedly and objective of his choosing at a moments notice. The lesson would begin, and he would bring in an object and then announce that he wanted it drawing, we had 5 mins to draw it and in that time we had to get as much detail in. He use to do this to get you to think about the form of the object, and how it interacts with the surrounding environment.

 

Practice on a sheet of a4 (start off small paper wise and then work up), drawing circles, horizontal parallel lines and vertical lines. Practice free hand ellipses. Keep practicing these on a separate sheet until you are confident with them and the pen/pencil. Remember don't erase errors, leave them on the paper as a way of reminding your how to improve. I was always told date and keep every drawing as it will serve as a way of showing how you have improved, and believe me it does work. It will take a while before you see a difference, but keep working at it and it will soon come.

 

Try the following out for additional information, and help.

 

http://www.dueysdrawings.com/drawing_tutorials.html

http://www.drawspace.com

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Guest spadez

Thank you for all the useful information. I definitely have a lot of work ahead of me, but the idea of breaking it down makes it seem much more manageable. Ill try to stay active on here, posting regular updates of my drawing work and moving forward from there.

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