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Guest NelsonDesign

Nelsondaily

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Guest NelsonDesign
again, complete the sketches, your drawing style looks fairly clean and accurate to me, so it looks really odd right now that the sketches look incomplete.

 

proper weight~

 

Mm, it's probably the fact that I didn't put the wheels in, right?

 

By the proper weight part, are you saying I should work on my line weight?

 

Thanks for the feedback man!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Okay, here's tonight's sketch. Photo reference of the new Buick LaCrosse.

 

I actually put in wheels this time! I also focused a bit more on line weight and making it look complete.

Yet I can never get the thing to scan right, it looks so different from the sketch I did! UGH

post-30452-1268284526.jpg

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I actually really like the last post on page 1. Pretty good proportions. Espeically the middle one, thats an extremely tough perspective to draw, so props on that one! For quick sketches like that, try not to overdesign the wheels, because then the wheels might be the first read instead of the car. Like the sketch on page 2. Ideation sketches should be loose, and I think the last one on page 1 feels a bit more loose and fun then the more static and finished one on this page. Also the proportions look better than the one on this page.

 

Keep it up and try to work on line weight like Taro suggested.

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Guest Taro

i think your lastest work is definately better, even though you still seem unsure about line weight, and where exactly to place these line weight so that your sketches would look more dramatic.

 

If you are really having trouble, you really need to go around and look at some nicely done car sketches, and you will probably find common areas where the artists like to place heavy line weight.

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Guest Gringoire

Here's a little something I think you did without being aware of (I've got the image below). You focused on some specific parts of the car (I placed them in a box) and you added line weight a lot more than the rest of the car's body. Ok, so what's with that anyway? Well, you see, the rest of the car is quite wrong on the perspective issue and what's more, it doesn't have proper line weight so it gets even worse. No construction lines and wheels as perspective (not as detail) are off... So you focused one one thing but went wrong in the whole thing. As for those parts where you added some focus and line weight, they're ok. Try to get the whole car done well rather than doing some parts very well but leaving the rest of it in darkness. You should do this in order leave a better idea of your capabilities and in order to get proper feedback on whatever you want to improve at.

 

P.S. on the Pininfarina B0 it's wheels and line weight since you went the most accurate with perspective and construction lines. So watch out next time for these two present issues...

post-27742-1268321477.jpg

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Guest NelsonDesign

Thanks for the feedback everyone!

 

I got quite a few conflicting messages on these last comments, so I'll need some help figuring them out....

 

 

 

 

I actually really like the last post on page 1. Pretty good proportions. Espeically the middle one, thats an extremely tough perspective to draw, so props on that one! For quick sketches like that, try not to overdesign the wheels, because then the wheels might be the first read instead of the car. Like the sketch on page 2. Ideation sketches should be loose, and I think the last one on page 1 feels a bit more loose and fun then the more static and finished one on this page. Also the proportions look better than the one on this page.

 

Keep it up and try to work on line weight like Taro suggested.

 

lol, wheels have been my worst feature starting from when I began drawing. I've gotten e-mails from random strangers telling me I should be drawing better wheels lol. I am not sure whether not putting wheels at all (Pininfarina B0), or making them too complex is better (Buick LaCrosse)? I didn't really think that I was putting too much time into the Buick's wheels, but who knows? What do you suggest? Meet the Pininfarina sketch and Buick sketch in the middle?

 

Thanks a lot!

 

i think your lastest work is definately better, even though you still seem unsure about line weight, and where exactly to place these line weight so that your sketches would look more dramatic.

 

If you are really having trouble, you really need to go around and look at some nicely done car sketches, and you will probably find common areas where the artists like to place heavy line weight.

 

Well can you maybe give me some suggestions?

 

Here's what I've heard, you should put darker lines toward where you what your focal point, around windows, and as the outline. So for example, For the swage line on the Buick, I made it dark around the closest corner and gave it a lighter line as it went away from the corner. I also made the taillamps dark because they were close to the corner, made the outline darker, and made the windows stand out more.

 

Maybe I am just not doing it dark enough? Should I emphasize them even more?

What do you suggest?

 

Thanks Taro!

 

 

Here's a little something I think you did without being aware of (I've got the image below). You focused on some specific parts of the car (I placed them in a box) and you added line weight a lot more than the rest of the car's body. Ok, so what's with that anyway? Well, you see, the rest of the car is quite wrong on the perspective issue and what's more, it doesn't have proper line weight so it gets even worse. No construction lines and wheels as perspective (not as detail) are off... So you focused one one thing but went wrong in the whole thing. As for those parts where you added some focus and line weight, they're ok. Try to get the whole car done well rather than doing some parts very well but leaving the rest of it in darkness. You should do this in order leave a better idea of your capabilities and in order to get proper feedback on whatever you want to improve at.

 

P.S. on the Pininfarina B0 it's wheels and line weight since you went the most accurate with perspective and construction lines. So watch out next time for these two present issues...

 

 

 

Thanks Gringoire for the feedback.

 

I told Taro this. What I've heard is that you should give more line weight to the focal point (The nearest corner), to the windows, and the outline. Also on the top sketch I wanted to just show the front, which was going to be my focal point, so I darkened it. I focused on the whole car equally, but I put more ink on the areas I was supposed to (at least I thought).

 

Here's where I am really confused though, you said...

 

"...the rest of the car is quite wrong on the perspective issue...", but then on the sentence directly after that you said...

 

"...No construction lines and wheels as perspective are off..."

 

I just don't understand what you were saying there. Maybe you can make an overlay if you see my perspective is off?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks a lot everyone! I really appreciate all the help! Sorry for all the questions.

 

P.S. I won't have time for the sketch tonight, I'll get one in tomorrow

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Alright, I suggest that you don`t listen to me at all, as I am useless anyway, and I have no clue in design as such, but anyway if you happen to read this, here are my 5 cents. Let`s talk about colours.

Let`s start with violet colours- with letters A and B attached. Those violet lines show the door width. The door width is usually decided on how prioritised they are compared to each other. In a regular sedan where people usually sit in the front and kids usually at rear, or occasional passengers at rear , the front doors tend to be slightly wider than rear ones. In limousines quite often the rear doors are wider than the front because the owner would sit in the rear , while the chauffeur in front. So be careful here, otherwise we might think that this is an upper -premium Buick, which I guess it is not.

Next,the brown line and the red ones. The brown line is probably the most important line in the car as it is the symmetry line. look closer and you will see that the red line above and underneath are symmetrical to the middle line. This is called a sound language of design( well done Buick!).

The green line. The green line shows the height of the window. The height of the window should be always compared to the total height of the car. Sometimes if the window height is too small, the car looks distorted. Usually the aspect ratio of door height versus window height is not bigger than 3 to 1. 3 to 1 is already in dangerous waters. In older cars the the ratio was half the window and half the door height, today this has changed and window height has dramatically decreased. One production vehicle that is on verge with window/door aspect ratio is lexus LF-A. pretty close shave I would say. Sometimes designers try to save an extremely tall doors by colouring lower mouldings on the car in black colour.

The blue lines show some simple and nice principles of continuity which you will ignore and consider `made up by me` probably. Anyway, well done Buick!.

Now the trickiest part. it is hard to tell, whether your car is going in perspective, or it is slanted upwards. The easiest way to tell it ,would be by measuring perspective on wheel rims, but as they are not very clear on front, so I will discard that.

But, my forensic hunch tells me that the line we can rely on is the middle brown line, which looks to me, Buick designers used as a parallel line to wheel centers.I judge it because the brown line was deducted from where the middle of symmetry from red line would be located. So either , the yellow lower line either should be parallel to the brown line or both line should go slightly in perspective approaching each other somewhat. that is it, nice sketch.

post-28725-1268421157.jpg

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Guest Taro

ok, maybe you pointed it out yourself, it may not be dark enough.

 

'contrast' is usually what pulls you in, and the element that makes a sketch look attractive.

 

for example, http://www.drawthrough.com/images_gallery/...rs_1_268_t2.jpg

 

look at that sketch for a sec.

 

let's not talk about 'thickness' yet, but just the darkness alone. From construction line (lightest) to seperation line (darkest), we probably see a value change from 1-7 or 8, or even 10.

 

On yours, I can only see a change from 1-4 or 5.

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maybe this will help you more, look at this Nisan. The green line is the imagined symmetry axis. See how lines gain symmetry to that, also observe how other lines tend to be parallel to each other.

post-28725-1268426201.jpg

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Guest NelsonDesign
This is the way I see it... I may be a little eccentric however.

 

Well thanks for pointing out all of those mistakes, I can see most of them now. Just so you know though, the front wheel on the front view is turning :P

 

Thanks for the help

 

 

Alright, I suggest that you don`t listen to me at all, as I am useless anyway, and I have no clue in design as such, but anyway if you happen to read this, here are my 5 cents. Let`s talk about colours.

Let`s start with violet colours- with letters A and B attached. Those violet lines show the door width. The door width is usually decided on how prioritised they are compared to each other. In a regular sedan where people usually sit in the front and kids usually at rear, or occasional passengers at rear , the front doors tend to be slightly wider than rear ones. In limousines quite often the rear doors are wider than the front because the owner would sit in the rear , while the chauffeur in front. So be careful here, otherwise we might think that this is an upper -premium Buick, which I guess it is not.

Next,the brown line and the red ones. The brown line is probably the most important line in the car as it is the symmetry line. look closer and you will see that the red line above and underneath are symmetrical to the middle line. This is called a sound language of design( well done Buick!).

The green line. The green line shows the height of the window. The height of the window should be always compared to the total height of the car. Sometimes if the window height is too small, the car looks distorted. Usually the aspect ratio of door height versus window height is not bigger than 3 to 1. 3 to 1 is already in dangerous waters. In older cars the the ratio was half the window and half the door height, today this has changed and window height has dramatically decreased. One production vehicle that is on verge with window/door aspect ratio is lexus LF-A. pretty close shave I would say. Sometimes designers try to save an extremely tall doors by colouring lower mouldings on the car in black colour.

The blue lines show some simple and nice principles of continuity which you will ignore and consider `made up by me` probably. Anyway, well done Buick!.

Now the trickiest part. it is hard to tell, whether your car is going in perspective, or it is slanted upwards. The easiest way to tell it ,would be by measuring perspective on wheel rims, but as they are not very clear on front, so I will discard that.

But, my forensic hunch tells me that the line we can rely on is the middle brown line, which looks to me, Buick designers used as a parallel line to wheel centers.I judge it because the brown line was deducted from where the middle of symmetry from red line would be located. So either , the yellow lower line either should be parallel to the brown line or both line should go slightly in perspective approaching each other somewhat. that is it, nice sketch.

 

Thanks for the help. I can't really comment on much of this, but that symmetry line is pretty interesting.

 

Thanks!

 

 

ok, maybe you pointed it out yourself, it may not be dark enough.

 

'contrast' is usually what pulls you in, and the element that makes a sketch look attractive.

 

for example, http://www.drawthrough.com/images_gallery/...rs_1_268_t2.jpg

 

look at that sketch for a sec.

 

let's not talk about 'thickness' yet, but just the darkness alone. From construction line (lightest) to seperation line (darkest), we probably see a value change from 1-7 or 8, or even 10.

 

On yours, I can only see a change from 1-4 or 5.

 

Thanks a lot Taro.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now just so you guys know, I didn't really get a chance to try and improve on what you guys said, and tonight's sketches are not the greatest. But I had fun doing them

post-30452-1268457752.jpg

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Guest NelsonDesign

Thanks for your feedback Gringoire!

 

I am really happy with tonight's sketches, but my scanner is acting up, so hopefully it will be working tomorrow.

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Guest MBW17
Thanks for your feedback Gringoire!

 

I am really happy with tonight's sketches, but my scanner is acting up, so hopefully it will be working tomorrow.

 

 

you got a camera?

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Guest NelsonDesign
Thanks for your feedback Gringoire!

 

I am really happy with tonight's sketches, but my scanner is acting up, so hopefully it will be working tomorrow.

 

 

you got a camera?

 

Yeah, but it would be a serious pain to hook up

 

 

 

Okay guys, really happy about it, but my scanner is still acting weird, so I won't have any today. I will try and sort out the problem (again)

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Guest NelsonDesign

Like I said, pretty happy with these ones. More sketches for the Brazil contest on Speedanddesign.net. I'm planning on incorporating a jet theme into it, because Brazil is one of the biggest countries for Aircraft manufacturing (specifically Embraer)

 

Hope you like them

post-30452-1268704766.jpg

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