Jump to content
Product Design Forums

Treasurebox
Sign in to follow this  
Guest PEDROBRAS

3d Printing

Recommended Posts

Guest PEDROBRAS

Hi, does anyone know which material is used to "build" the prototype? is it some kind of plastic dust or some plastic film? or what?

 

Have any of yow already seen one of these being used? what about it's precision?

 

any info would be extremely useful,

 

 

thanks a lot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi, does anyone know which material is used to "build" the prototype? is it some kind of plastic dust or some plastic film? or what?

 

Have any of yow already seen one of these being used? what about it's precision?

 

any info would be extremely useful,

 

 

thanks a lot.

 

Google Rapid prototyping. There are many different types of prototyping machines. They use everything from melted plastic resin, melted wax, rubber, or powder bonded by glue.

 

We use them every day, and depending on the machine and material they are typically rather accurate, though they work on a means of going layer by layer, so you get a "Stair step" or pancake effect where the edges in 1 direction are more coarse then the others. On modern machines the accuracy tolerance is down to the thousandth of an inch, or ~.025mm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Three Dimensional Printing can substantially reduce the time to market for new products, enhance product quality by improving the coupling between design and manufacturing, and lower product cost by reducing development and tooling costs. Plastic films have outstanding properties as heat stability; transparency and durability allow successful vacuum metallizing, and offer tremendous potential for developing new products.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, does anyone know which material is used to "build" the prototype? is it some kind of plastic dust or some plastic film? or what?

 

Have any of yow already seen one of these being used? what about it's precision?

 

any info would be extremely useful,

 

 

thanks a lot.

 

There are a couple of different materials used, depending on the 3d - printing machine. The cheapest usually is to use polyamide or a kind of composite. Besides this, you will also need a support material sometimes, depending on the model that you want to print.

 

This could be either the same material in powder form, in which several layers are bound (stepwise, like described by Cyberdemon) and then solidified, so the surrounding powder supports the model and can then be removed afterwards. Globally, the machine would work like this:

screenshot20110411at291.png

 

Another option is having a liquid, which the same material can be used as a support. A 'beehive' like structure is then used, which van be removed after production.

 

Finally, there is another option in which two different materials are used to build it directly on the platform. One can be removed easily by putting it in contact with a kind of chemical. This one is used at our faculty., with a precision of a 5 microns. I am currently using this one for a small model of a car I modeled in Rhino.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The prototyping machine reads in data from a CAD drawing and lays down successive layers of liquid, powder, or sheet material, and in this way builds up

 

the model from a series of cross sections. These layers, which correspond to the virtual cross section from the CAD model, are joined together or fused

 

automatically to create the final shape.

 

A large number of competing technologies are available in the marketplace like Stereolithography (SLA),Fused deposition modeling (FDM),

 

Laminated object manufacturing (LOM), Selective laser sintering (SLS).As all are additive technologies, their main differences are found

 

in the way layers are built to create parts. I took the experiment of LOM several years ago when I was in the universty. It looks cool.

 

Actually this technology is outdate now, as well as the SLA, FDM, SLS, but they are used for a much wider range of applications.

 

Our company provide prototyping product,too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.